Pinocchio Goes Postmodern

Pinocchio Goes Postmodern

Author: Richard Wunderlich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135023188

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 371

In the first full-length study in English of Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio, the authors show how the checkered history of the puppet illuminates social change from the pre World War One era to the present. The authors argue that most Americans know a trivialized, diluted version of the tale, one such source is Disney's perennial classic. The authors also discover that when adults are introduced to the 'real' story, they often deem it as unsuitable for children. Placing the puppet in a variety of contexts, the authors chart the progression of this childhood tale that has frequently undergone dramatic revisions to suit America's idea of children's literature.

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Author: Katia Pizzi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136620508

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 423

This study assesses the significance of Pinocchio in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in addition to his status as the creature of a nineteenth century traversed by a cultural enthusiasm for dummies, puppets, and marionettes. This collection identifies him as a figure characterized by a 'fluid identity,' informed with transition, difference, joie de vivre, otherness, displacement, and metamorphosis, making Pinocchio a truly modern, indeed postmodern and posthuman, cultural icon. Pinocchio, Puppets and Modernity explores this crucial and as yet little visited field, reassessing Pinocchio's genealogy and progeny, as well as illuminating both the wider context and more specific cultural manifestations of the mechanical-human interface in the domains of theatre, the fine arts, literature, radio, and even virtual reality coherently with the digital metamorphosis of our times. The wide-ranging scope of this exploration encompasses Italian, French, and English literature, dummies and marionettes in modernist and contemporary theatre, the fairytale tradition, and traditional and contemporary painting, as well as the older and newer media of radio, television, cinema, and the Internet. The diverse, comparative, and multimedia focus of this original discussion testifies to the enduring transcultural legacy of Pinocchio. Eminently sellable as a traditional cultural icon, Pinocchio is equally impactful and relevant for a globalized, multicultural, and virtual society, from Collodi to Disney and beyond. Katia Pizzi is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. She has published volumes on cultural identities, including A City in Search of an Author (2001) and The Cultural Identities of European Cities (2010), and on children's literature and illustration.

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

Author: Jack Zipes

Publisher: Oxford Companions

ISBN: 9780199689828

Category: Fairy tales

Page: 720

View: 184

This Oxford companion provides an authoritative reference source for fairy tales, exploring the tales themselves, both ancient and modern, the writers who wrote and reworked them and related topics such as film, art, opera and even advertising.

An Artist Empowered: Define and Establish Your Value as an Artist—Now

An Artist Empowered: Define and Establish Your Value as an Artist—Now

Author: Eden Maxwell

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780615150956

Category: Self-Help

Page: 494

View: 778

"Eden Maxwell is a brilliant and passionate artist who has explored, challenged, and mastered every facet of the creative process . . . from the trenches to the mountaintops, it's all here: a powerful and pragmatic textbook for artists of every age and stage of development; a virtual how-to for creators embarking on the spiritual voyage of a lifetime." -Mary Anne Bartley, Artist-in-Residence: Villanova University, WHYY, PBS.

Children's Literature and the Posthuman

Children's Literature and the Posthuman

Author: Zoe Jaques

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136674914

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 982

An investigation of identity formation in children's literature, this book brings together children’s literature and recent critical concerns with posthuman identity to argue that children’s fiction offers sophisticated interventions into debates about what it means to be human, and in particular about humanity’s relationship to animals and the natural world. In complicating questions of human identity, ecology, gender, and technology, Jaques engages with a multifaceted posthumanism to understand how philosophy can emerge from children's fantasy, disclosing how such fantasy can build upon earlier traditions to represent complex issues of humanness to younger audiences. Interrogating the place of the human through the non-human (whether animal or mechanical) leads this book to have interpretations that radically depart from the critical tradition, which, in its concerns with the socialization and representation of the child, has ignored larger epistemologies of humanness. The book considers canonical texts of children's literature alongside recent bestsellers and films, locating texts such as Gulliver’s Travels (1726), Pinocchio (1883) and the Alice books (1865, 1871) as important works in the evolution of posthuman ideas. This study provides radical new readings of children’s literature and demonstrates that the genre offers sophisticated interventions into the nature, boundaries and dominion of humanity.

Killing the Moonlight

Killing the Moonlight

Author: Jennifer Scappettone

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231537742

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 472

View: 159

As a city that seems to float between Europe and Asia, removed by a lagoon from the tempos of terra firma, Venice has long seduced the Western imagination. Since the 1797 fall of the Venetian Republic, fantasies about the sinking city have engendered an elaborate series of romantic clichés, provoking conflicting responses: some modern artists and intellectuals embrace the resistance to modernity manifest in Venice's labyrinthine premodern form and temporality, whereas others aspire to modernize by "killing the moonlight" of Venice, in the Futurists' notorious phrase. Spanning the history of literature, art, and architecture—from John Ruskin, Henry James, and Ezra Pound to Manfredo Tafuri, Italo Calvino, Jeanette Winterson, and Robert Coover—Killing the Moonlight tracks the pressures that modernity has placed on the legacy of romantic Venice, and the distinctive strains of aesthetic invention that resulted from the clash. In Venetian incarnations of modernism, the anachronistic urban fabric and vestigial sentiment that both the nation-state of Italy and the historical avant-garde would cast off become incompletely assimilated parts of the new. Killing the Moonlight brings Venice into the geography of modernity as a living city rather than a metaphor for death, and presents the archipelago as a crucible for those seeking to define and transgress the conceptual limits of modernism. In strategic detours from the capitals of modernity, the book redrafts the confines of modernist culture in both geographical and historical terms.

Consuming Agency in Fairy Tales, Childlore, and Folkliterature

Consuming Agency in Fairy Tales, Childlore, and Folkliterature

Author: Susan Honeyman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136603945

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 526

In this book Honeyman looks at manifestations of youth agency (and representations of agency produced for youth) as depicted in fairy tales, childlore and folk literature, investigating the dynamic of ideological manipulation and independent resistance as it can be read or expressed in bodies, first through social puppetry and then through coercive temptation (our consumption replacing the more obvious strings that bind us). Reading tales like Popeye, Hansel & Gretel, and Pinocchio, Honeyman concentrates on the agency of young subjects through material relations, especially where food signifies the invisible strings used to control them in popular discourse and practice, modeling efforts to come out from under the hegemonic handler and take control, at least of their own body spaces, and ultimately finding that most examples indicate less power than the ideal holds.

On Civic Republicanism

On Civic Republicanism

Author: Geoffrey Kellow

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442625471

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 784

Continuing the analysis of contemporary issues through the lens of ancient theories beyond the themes of Enduring Empire and the award-winning On Oligarchy, On Civic Republicanism explores the enduring relevance of the ancient concepts of republicanism and civic virtue to modern questions about political engagement and identity. Examining both ancient and early modern conceptions of civic republicanism, the contributors respond to the work of thinkers ranging from Plato and Aristotle to Machiavelli, Montesquieu, and Wollstonecraft. A testament to the continuing influence of the concept and the ongoing scholarly debate which surrounds it, On Civic Republicanism addresses fundamental questions regarding democratic participation, liberal democracy, and the public good. Its essays speak to the many ways in which the idea of the republic still challenges us today.

Walt Disney, from Reader to Storyteller

Walt Disney, from Reader to Storyteller

Author: Kathy Merlock Jackson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786472321

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 394

Although Walt Disney is best known as a filmmaker, perhaps his greatest skill and influence was as a reader. While many would have regarded Felix Salten's Bambi and Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio as too somber for family-oriented animated films, he saw possibilities in them. He appealed to his audience by selecting familiar stories, but transformed them to suit audience sensibilities. Many of the tales he chose to adapt to film went on to become the most read books in America, eventually becoming literary classics. Although much published research has addressed his adaptation process--often criticizing his films for being too saccharine or not true to their literary sources--little has been written on him as a reader: what he read, what he liked, his reading experiences, and the books that influenced him. This collection of essays addresses Disney as a reader and shows how his responses to literature fueled his success. Essays discuss the books he read, the ones he adapted to film, and the ways in which he demonstrated his narrative ability. Exploring his literary connections in reference to his animated and live-action films, nature documentaries, theme park creations, and overall creative vision, the contributors provide insight into Walt Disney's relationships with authors, his animation staff, and his audience.

Storybook Worlds Made Real

Storybook Worlds Made Real

Author: Mark I. West

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476674186

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 109

Memorable children's narratives immerse readers in imaginary worlds that bring them into the story. Some of these places have been constructed in the real world--like Pinocchio's Tuscany or Anne of Green Gables' Prince Edward Island--where visitors relive their favorite childhood tales. Theme parks like Walt Disney World and Harry Potter World use technology to engineer enchanting environments that reconnect visitors with beloved fictional settings and characters in new ways. This collection of new essays explores the imagined places we loved as kids, with a focus on the meaning of setting and its power to shape the way we view the world.

Folktales and Fairy Tales: Traditions and Texts from around the World, 2nd Edition [4 volumes]

Folktales and Fairy Tales: Traditions and Texts from around the World, 2nd Edition [4 volumes]

Author: Anne E. Duggan Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781610692540

Category: Social Science

Page: 1590

View: 449

Encyclopedic in its coverage, this one-of-a-kind reference is ideal for students, scholars, and others who need reliable, up-to-date information on folk and fairy tales, past and present. • Provides encyclopedic coverage of folktales and fairy tales from around the globe • Covers not only the history of the fairy tale, but also topics of contemporary importance such as the fairy tale in manga, television, pop music, and music videos • Brings together the study of geography, culture, history, and anthropology • Revises and expands an award-winning work to now include a full volume of selected tales and texts

Under the Bed, Creeping

Under the Bed, Creeping

Author: Michael Howarth

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476615981

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 241

From Puritan tracts and chapbooks to fairy tales and Victorian poems, from zombies and werewolves to ghosts and vampires, the gothic has become an important part of children’s literature. This book explores how Gothicism is crucial in helping children progress through different stages of growth and development. It examines five famous texts—Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market, Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio, Neil Gaiman’s Coraline, three versions of Little Red Riding Hood, and J.M. Barrie’s play and then novel Peter and Wendy—incorporating renowned psychologist Erik Erikson’s landmark theories on psychosocial stages of development. By linking a particular stage to each of the aforementioned texts, it becomes clearer how anxiety and terror are just as important as happiness and wonder in fostering maturity, achieving a sense of independence and fulfilling one’s self-identity. Gothic elements give shape to children’s fears, which is precisely how children are able to defeat them, and through their interactions with the ghosts and goblins that inhabit fantasy worlds, children come to better understand their own world, as well as their own lives.