A Female Poetics of Empire

A Female Poetics of Empire

Author: Julia Kuehn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134663064

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 438

Many well-known male writers produced fictions about colonial spaces and discussed the advantages of realism over romance, and vice versa, in the ‘art of fiction’ debate of the 1880s; but how did female writers contribute to colonial fiction? This volume links fictional, non-fictional and pictorial representations of a colonial otherness with the late nineteenth-century artistic concerns about representational conventions and possibilities. The author explores these texts and images through the postcolonial framework of ‘exoticism’, arguing that the epistemological dilemma of a ‘self’ encountering an ‘other’ results in the interrelated predicament to find poetic modalities – mimetic, realistic and documentary on the one hand; romantic, fantastic and picturesque on the other – that befit an ‘exotic’ representation. Thus women writers did not only participate in the making of colonial fictions but also in the late nineteenth-century artistic debate about the nature of fiction. This book maps the epistemological concerns of exoticism and of difference – self and other, home and away, familiarity and strangeness – onto the representational modes of realism and romance. The author focuses exclusively on female novelists, travel writers and painters of the turn-of-the-century exotic, and especially on neglected authors of academically under-researched genres such as the bestselling novel and the travelogue.

Dickens' Novels as Poetry

Dickens' Novels as Poetry

Author: Jeremy Tambling

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317612889

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 556

Focusing on the language, style, and poetry of Dickens’ novels, this study breaks new ground in reading Dickens’ novels as a unique form of poetry. Dickens’ writing disallows the statement of single unambiguous truths and shows unconscious processes burrowing within language, disrupting received ideas and modes of living. Arguing that Dickens, within nineteenth-century modernity, sees language as always double, Tambling draws on a wide range of Victorian texts and current critical theory to explore Dickens’ interest in literature and popular song, and what happens in jokes, in caricature, in word-play and punning, and in naming. Working from Dickens’ earliest writings to the latest, deftly combining theory with close analysis of texts, the book examines Dickens’ key novels, such as Pickwick Papers, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and Son, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. It considers Dickens as constructing an urban poetry, alert to language coming from sources beyond the individual, and relating that to the dream-life of characters, who both can and cannot awake to fuller, different consciousness. Drawing on Walter Benjamin, Lacan, and Derrida, Tambling shows how Dickens writes a new and comic poetry of the city, and that the language constitutes an unconscious and secret autobiography. This volume takes Dickens scholarship in exciting new directions and will be of interest to all readers of nineteenth-century literary and cultural studies, and more widely, to all readers of literature.

Continental Tourism, Travel Writing, and the Consumption of Culture, 1814–1900

Continental Tourism, Travel Writing, and the Consumption of Culture, 1814–1900

Author: Benjamin Colbert

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030361464

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 531

This book explores the boundaries of British continental travel and tourism in the nineteenth century, stretching from Norway to Bulgaria, from visitors’ albums to missionary efforts, from juvenilia to joint authorship. The essay topics invoke new aesthetics of travel as consumption, travel as satire, and of the developing culture of tourism. Chronologically arranged, the book charts the growth and permutations of this new consumerist ideology of travel driven by the desires of both men and women: the insatiable appetite for new accounts of old routes as well as appropriation of the new; interart reproductions of description and illustration; and wider cultural manifestations of tourism within popular entertainment and domestic settings. Continental tourism provides multiple perspectives with wide-ranging coverage of cultural phenomena increasingly incorporated into and affected by the nineteenth-century continental tour. The essays suggest the coextension of travel alongside experiential boundaries and reveal the emergence of a consumerist attitude toward travel that persists in the present day.

New Directions in Travel Writing Studies

New Directions in Travel Writing Studies

Author: Paul Smethurst

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137457257

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 325

View: 661

This collection focuses attention on theoretical approaches to travel writing, with the aim to advance the discourse. Internationally renowned, as well as emerging, scholars establish a critical milieu for travel writing studies, as well as offer a set of exemplars in the application of theory to travel writing.

Women's Writing of the First World War

Women's Writing of the First World War

Author: Emma Liggins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429939495

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 126

View: 771

The First World War was a transformative experience for women, facilitating their entry into new spaces and alternative spheres of activity, both on the home front and on the edges of danger zones in Europe and beyond. The centenary of the conflict is an appropriate moment to reassess what we choose to remember about women’s roles and responsibilities in this period and how women recorded their experiences. It is timely to (re)consider the narratives of women’s involvement not only as nurses, VADs and mourning mothers, but as pacifist campaigners, poets, war correspondents and contributors to developing genres of war writing. This interdisciplinary volume examines women’s representations of wartime experience across a wide range of genres, including modernist fiction, ghost stories, utopia, poetry, life-writing and journalism. Contributors provide fresh perspectives on women’s written responses to the conflict, exploring women’s war work, constructions of femininity and the maternal in wartime, and the relationship between feminism, suffrage and pacifism. The volume reinforces the importance of the retrieval of women’s wartime experience, urging us to rethink what we choose to commemorate and widening the presence of women in the expanding canon of war writing. This book was originally published as a special issue of Women’s Writing.

Mixed Race Britain in The Twentieth Century

Mixed Race Britain in The Twentieth Century

Author: Chamion Caballero

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137339287

Category: Social Science

Page: 552

View: 831

This book explores the overlooked history of racial mixing in Britain during the course of the twentieth century, a period in which there was considerable and influential public debate on the meanings and implications of intimately crossing racial boundaries. Based on research that formed the foundations of the British television series Mixed Britannia, the authors draw on a range of firsthand accounts and archival material to compare ‘official’ accounts of racial mixing and mixedness with those told by mixed race people, couples and families themselves. Mixed Race Britain in The Twentieth Century shows that alongside the more familiarly recognised experiences of social bigotry and racial prejudice there can also be glimpsed constant threads of tolerance, acceptance, inclusion and ‘ordinariness’. It presents a more complex and multifaceted history of mixed race Britain than is typically assumed, one that adds to the growing picture of the longstanding diversity and difference that is, and always has been, an ordinary and everyday feature of British life.

Reinventing Marie Corelli for the Twenty-First Century

Reinventing Marie Corelli for the Twenty-First Century

Author: Brenda Ayres

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9781783089444

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 561

Novelist Marie Corelli was extremely popular at the turn of the century, so much so that J. M. Stuart-Young complained about the ‘Corelli Cult’. Corelli broke all sales records during the 30 years of her publishing. Her books have enjoyed a resurgence of interest over the past two decades for various reasons but ostensibly due to their challenge to gender constrictions. Corelli’s perception of gender and her gender demeanor were complicated and mercurial. Speculation that she was transgendered, a deduction drawn from her writing and from her having lived in an intimate relationship with Bertha Vyver for 64 years, makes her a person of interest today. Additionally, her 30 novels, short stories and essays are all in print and they reflect a myriad of themes and experiences as relevant today, if not more so, than during the late Victorian period. So far, other than a special issue of ‘Women’s Writing’ in 2006, no collection of essays on Corelli has been published. ‘Reinventing Marie Corelli for the Twenty-First Century’ is the first to remedy that, prompted by her current popularity, a desire to introduce her to a new generation and to instigate critical inquiry that will offer an appreciation for her themes, style and historical place in the literary canon.

Queer Victorian Families

Queer Victorian Families

Author: Duc Dau

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317647058

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 310

The Victorians elevated the home and heteronormative family life to an almost secular religion. Yet alongside the middle-class domestic ideal were other families, many of which existed in the literature of the time. Queer Victorian Families: Curious Relations in Literature is chiefly concerned with these atypical or "queer" families. This collection serves as a corrective against limited definitions of family and is a timely addition to Victorian studies. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collection opens up new possibilities for uncovering submerged, marginalized, and alternative stories in Victorian literature. Broad in scope, subjects range from Count Fosco and his animal "children" in Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White, to male kinship within and across Alfred Tennyson’s In Memoriam and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, and the nexus between disability and loving relationships in the fiction of Dinah Mulock Craik and Charlotte M. Yonge. Queer Victorian Families is a wide-ranging and theoretically adventurous exposé of the curious relations in the literary family tree.

Walt Whitman and British Socialism

Walt Whitman and British Socialism

Author: Kirsten Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317634812

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 355

This is the first sustained examination of Walt Whitman’s influence on British socialism. Harris combines a contextual historical study of Whitman’s reception with focused close readings of a variety of poems, books, articles, letters and speeches. She calls attention to Whitman’s own demand for the reader to ‘himself or herself construct indeed the poem, argument, history, metaphysical essay’, linking Whitman’s general comments about active reading to specific cases of his fin de siècle British socialist readership. These include the editorial aims behind the Whitman selections published by William Michael Rossetti, Ernest Rhys, and W. T. Stead and the ways that Whitman was interpreted and appropriated in a wide range of grassroots texts produced by individuals or groups who responded to Whitman and his poetry publicly in socialist circles. Harris makes full use of material from the C. F. Sixsmith and J. W. Wallace and the Bolton Whitman Fellowship collections at John Rylands, the Edward Carpenter collection in the Sheffield Archives, and the Archives of Swan Sonnenschein & Co. at the University of Reading. Much of this archive material – little of which is currently available in digital form – is discussed here in full for the first time. Accordingly, this study will appeal to those with interest in the archival history of nineteenth-century literary culture, as well as the connections to be made between literary and political culture of this era more generally.

Economies of Desire at the Victorian Fin de Siècle

Economies of Desire at the Victorian Fin de Siècle

Author: Jane Ford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317576594

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 846

This volume marks the first sustained study to interrogate how and why issues of sexuality, desire, and economic processes intersect in the literature and culture of the Victorian fin de siècle. At the end of the nineteenth-century, the move towards new models of economic thought marked the transition from a marketplace centred around the fulfilment of ‘needs’ to one ministering to anything that might, potentially, be desired. This collection considers how the literature of the period meditates on the interaction between economy and desire, doing so with particular reference to the themes of fetishism, homoeroticism, the literary marketplace, social hierarchy, and consumer culture. Drawing on theoretical and conceptual approaches including queer theory, feminist theory, and gift theory, contributors offer original analyses of work by canonical and lesser-known writers, including Oscar Wilde, A.E. Housman, Baron Corvo, Vernon Lee, Michael Field, and Lucas Malet. The collection builds on recent critical developments in fin-de-siècle literature (including major interventions in the areas of Decadence, sexuality, and gender studies) and asks, for instance, how did late nineteenth-century writing schematise the libidinal and somatic dimensions of economic exchange? How might we define the relationship between eroticism and the formal economies of literary production/performance? And what relation exists between advertising/consumer culture and (dissident) sexuality in fin-de-siecle literary discourses? This book marks an important contribution to 19th-Century and Victorian literary studies, and enhances the field of fin-de-siècle studies more generally.

Pets and Domesticity in Victorian Literature and Culture

Pets and Domesticity in Victorian Literature and Culture

Author: Monica Flegel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317564867

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 383

Addressing the significance of the pet in the Victorian period, this book examines the role played by the domestic pet in delineating relations for each member of the "natural" family home. Flegel explores the pet in relation to the couple at the head of the house, to the children who make up the family’s dependents, and to the common familial "outcasts" who populate Victorian literature and culture: the orphan, the spinster, the bachelor, and the same-sex couple. Drawing upon both animal studies and queer theory, this study stresses the importance of the domestic pet in elucidating normative sexuality and (re)productivity within the familial home, and reveals how the family pet operates as a means of identifying aberrant, failed, or perverse familial and gender performances. The family pet, that is, was an important signifier in Victorian familial ideology of the individual family unit’s ability to support or threaten the health and morality of the nation in the Victorian period. Texts by authors such as Clara Balfour, Juliana Horatia Ewing, E. Burrows, Bessie Rayner Parkes, Anne Brontë, George Eliot, Frederick Marryat, and Charles Dickens speak to the centrality of the domestic pet to negotiations of gender, power, and sexuality within the home that both reify and challenge the imaginary structure known as the natural family in the Victorian period. This book highlights the possibilities for a familial elsewhere outside of normative and restrictive models of heterosexuality, reproduction, and the natural family, and will be of interest to those studying Victorian literature and culture, animal studies, queer studies, and beyond.

Dirt in Victorian Literature and Culture

Dirt in Victorian Literature and Culture

Author: Sabine Schülting

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317392613

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 466

Addressing the Victorian obsession with the sordid materiality of modern life, this book studies dirt in nineteenth-century English literature and the Victorian cultural imagination. Dirt litters Victorian writing – industrial novels, literature about the city, slum fiction, bluebooks, and the reports of sanitary reformers. It seems to be "matter out of place," challenging traditional concepts of art and disregarding the concern with hygiene, deodorization, and purification at the center of the "civilizing process." Drawing upon Material Cultural Studies for an analysis of the complex relationships between dirt and textuality, the study adds a new perspective to scholarship on both the Victorian sanitation movement and Victorian fiction. The chapters focus on Victorian commodity culture as a backdrop to narratives about refuse and rubbish; on the impact of waste and ordure on life stories; on the production and circulation of affective responses to filth in realist novels and slum travelogues; and on the function of dirt for both colonial discourse and its deconstruction in postcolonial writing. They address questions as to how texts about dirt create the effect of materiality, how dirt constructs or deconstructs meaning, and how the project of writing dirt attempts to contain its excessive materiality. Schülting discusses representations of dirt in a variety of texts by Charles Dickens, E. M. Forster, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Gissing, James Greenwood, Henry James, Charles Kingsley, Henry Mayhew, George Moore, Arthur Morrison, and others. In addition, she offers a sustained analysis of the impact of dirt on writing strategies and genre conventions, and pays particular attention to those moments when dirt is recycled and becomes the source of literary creation.