Alexander Von Humboldt and the United States

Alexander Von Humboldt and the United States

Author: Eleanor Jones Harvey

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691200804

Category: Art

Page: 445

View: 966

The enduring influence of naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt on American art, culture, and politics Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) was one of the most influential scientists and thinkers of his age. A Prussian-born geographer, naturalist, explorer, and illustrator, he was a prolific writer whose books graced the shelves of American artists, scientists, philosophers, and politicians. Humboldt visited the United States for six weeks in 1804, engaging in a lively exchange of ideas with such figures as Thomas Jefferson and the painter Charles Willson Peale. It was perhaps the most consequential visit by a European traveler in the young nation's history, one that helped to shape an emerging American identity grounded in the natural world. In this beautifully illustrated book, Eleanor Jones Harvey examines how Humboldt left a lasting impression on American visual arts, sciences, literature, and politics. She shows how he inspired a network of like-minded individuals who would go on to embrace the spirit of exploration, decry slavery, advocate for the welfare of Native Americans, and extol America's wilderness as a signature component of the nation's sense of self. Harvey traces how Humboldt's ideas influenced the transcendentalists and the landscape painters of the Hudson River School, and laid the foundations for the Smithsonian Institution, the Sierra Club, and the National Park Service. Alexander von Humboldt and the United States looks at paintings, sculptures, maps, and artifacts, and features works by leading American artists such as Albert Bierstadt, George Catlin, Frederic Church, and Samuel F. B. Morse. Published in association with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC Exhibition Schedule Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC September 18, 2020–January 3, 2021

The Passage to Cosmos

The Passage to Cosmos

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226871844

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 467

Explorer, scientist, writer, and humanist, Alexander von Humboldt was the most famous intellectual of the age that began with Napoleon and ended with Darwin. With Cosmos, the book that crowned his career, Humboldt offered to the world his vision of humans and nature as integrated halves of a single whole. In it, Humboldt espoused the idea that, while the universe of nature exists apart from human purpose, its beauty and order, the very idea of the whole it composes, are human achievements: cosmos comes into being in the dance of world and mind, subject and object, science and poetry. Humboldt’s science laid the foundations for ecology and inspired the theories of his most important scientific disciple, Charles Darwin. In the United States, his ideas shaped the work of Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, and Whitman. They helped spark the American environmental movement through followers like John Muir and George Perkins Marsh. And they even bolstered efforts to free the slaves and honor the rights of Indians. Laura Dassow Walls here traces Humboldt’s ideas for Cosmos to his 1799 journey to the Americas, where he first experienced the diversity of nature and of the world’s peoples—and envisioned a new cosmopolitanism that would link ideas, disciplines, and nations into a global web of knowledge and cultures. In reclaiming Humboldt’s transcultural and transdisciplinary project, Walls situates America in a lively and contested field of ideas, actions, and interests, and reaches beyond to a new worldview that integrates the natural and social sciences, the arts, and the humanities. To the end of his life, Humboldt called himself “half an American,” but ironically his legacy has largely faded in the United States. The Passage to Cosmos will reintroduce this seminal thinker to a new audience and return America to its rightful place in the story of his life, work, and enduring legacy.

The Adventures of Alexander Von Humboldt

The Adventures of Alexander Von Humboldt

Author: Andrea Wulf

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 9781524747381

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 272

View: 727

A KIRKUS REVIEWS BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR From the New York Times bestselling author of The Invention of Nature, comes a breathtakingly illustrated and brilliantly evocative recounting of Alexander Von Humboldt's five year expedition in South America. Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, but his most revolutionary idea was a radical vision of nature as a complex and interconnected global force that does not exist for the use of humankind alone. His theories and ideas were profoundly influenced by a five-year exploration of South America. Now Andrea Wulf partners with artist Lillian Melcher to bring this daring expedition to life, complete with excerpts from Humboldt's own diaries, atlases, and publications. She gives us an intimate portrait of the man who predicted human-induced climate change, fashioned poetic narrative out of scientific observation, and influenced iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Darwin, and John Muir. This gorgeous account of the expedition not only shows how Humboldt honed his groundbreaking understanding of the natural world but also illuminates the man and his passions.

Life of Alexander Von Humboldt

Life of Alexander Von Humboldt

Author: Julius Lowenberg

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 9781605209227

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 438

View: 232

Charles Darwin called him "the greatest traveling scientist who ever lived." Thomas Jefferson considered him "the most important scientist whom I have met." He was German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), and when he died, the entire Western world mourned the loss of one of the most notable scientists and popularizers of science of his day. His five-volume masterwork, Kosmos, sought to unify humanity's understanding of the natural world in the mid 19th century, and brought a modern understanding of science to lay audiences for the first time. This was the first comprehensive biography of the man and his work, written to celebrate the centenary of his birth by German authors ALFRED DOVE (1844-1916), JULIUS L WENBERG (1800-1893), and ROBERT AV -LALLEMANT (1812-1884)-the latter himself an explorer-and first published in English 1873. Though its subject was a private man about whom some things shall never be known-he burned much of his personal correspondence-these two volumes draw on firsthand memories, von Humboldt's writings, and other primary sources to create a dazzlingly engrossing portrait of the man who built the foundations of modern science. Volume I covers von Humboldt's youth and young adulthood-from the significance of his name to his schooling and university years to his first employment in the mining industry-through his first travels in Russia and the New World, including his expedition to the Orinoco, his visit to Cuba, and his explorations in Mexico.

Alexander Von Humboldt

Alexander Von Humboldt

Author: Nicolaas A. Rupke

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226731490

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 318

View: 456

Alexander von Humboldt is one of the most celebrated figures of late-modern science, famous for his work in physical geography, botanical geography and climatology. This volume traces Humboldt's biographical identities through Germany's collective past to shed light on the historical instability of our scientific heroes.

The Invention of Nature

The Invention of Nature

Author: Andrea Wulf

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780385350679

Category: Nature

Page: 496

View: 872

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • The acclaimed author of Founding Gardeners reveals the forgotten life of Alexander von Humboldt, the visionary German naturalist whose ideas changed the way we see the natural world—and in the process created modern environmentalism. "Vivid and exciting.... Wulf’s pulsating account brings this dazzling figure back into a dazzling, much-deserved focus.” —The Boston Globe Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was the most famous scientist of his age, a visionary German naturalist and polymath whose discoveries forever changed the way we understand the natural world. Among his most revolutionary ideas was a radical conception of nature as a complex and interconnected global force that does not exist for the use of humankind alone. In North America, Humboldt’s name still graces towns, counties, parks, bays, lakes, mountains, and a river. And yet the man has been all but forgotten. In this illuminating biography, Andrea Wulf brings Humboldt’s extraordinary life back into focus: his prediction of human-induced climate change; his daring expeditions to the highest peaks of South America and to the anthrax-infected steppes of Siberia; his relationships with iconic figures, including Simón Bolívar and Thomas Jefferson; and the lasting influence of his writings on Darwin, Wordsworth, Goethe, Muir, Thoreau, and many others. Brilliantly researched and stunningly written, The Invention of Nature reveals the myriad ways in which Humboldt’s ideas form the foundation of modern environmentalism—and reminds us why they are as prescient and vital as ever.

The Incredible yet True Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt

The Incredible yet True Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt

Author: Volker Mehnert

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 9781615196319

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 114

View: 330

Before Darwin . . . before Lewis and Clark . . . there was Alexander von Humboldt. Explorer. Naturalist. All-around genius. Lost hero of science. In his time, Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) was world-famous. Why? He led one of the first major scientific expeditions into the South American rain forest and another into the wilds of Siberia. Carrying fragile instruments, he navigated perilous rapids and climbed the volcano of Tenerife. He observed animals, plants, and cultures that no one in Europe had ever dreamed of, and his books about them inspired a whole generation of scientists—including Charles Darwin. But before he did any of that, he was a little boy who was curious about everything (especially bugs)! The Incredible yet True Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt will whisk you away to another time and place. Meet the young man who, defying his mother’s wishes, became a daring explorer-scientist—and follow along as he makes his amazing discoveries. Lavish illustrations bring Humboldt’s untamed world to life. See nature through the eyes of a great early scientist. Wonder awaits!

Humboldt's Cosmos

Humboldt's Cosmos

Author: Gerard Helferich

Publisher: Gotham

ISBN: 1592400523

Category: Science

Page: 358

View: 313

A detailed portrait of German naturalist and adventurer Alexander Humboldt describes his seminal five-year and six-thousand-mile scientific exploration of South America, chronicling his expedition through the Amazon and over the Andes, his extraordinary catalog of sixty thousand plants, his study of the ancient cultures of the region, and his influence on science. 30,000 first printing.

Views of Nature

Views of Nature

Author: Alexander von Humboldt

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022642247X

Category: Science

Page: 321

View: 904

While the influence of Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) looms large over the natural sciences, his legacy reaches far beyond the field notebooks of naturalists. Humboldt’s 1799–1804 research expedition to Central and South America with botanist Aimé Bonpland not only set the course for the great scientific surveys of the nineteenth century, but also served as the raw material for his many volumes—works of both scientific rigor and aesthetic beauty that inspired such essayists and artists as Emerson, Goethe, Thoreau, Poe, and Frederic Edwin Church. Views of Nature, or Ansichten der Natur, was Humboldt’s best-known and most influential work—and his personal favorite. While the essays that comprise it are themselves remarkable as innovative, early pieces of nature writing—they were cited by Thoreau as a model for his own work—the book’s extensive endnotes incorporate some of Humboldt’s most beautiful prose and mature thinking on vegetation structure, its origins in climate patterns, and its implications for the arts. Written for both a literary and a scientific audience, Views of Nature was translated into English (twice), Spanish, and French in the nineteenth century, and it was read widely in Europe and the Americas. But in contrast to many of Humboldt’s more technical works, Views of Nature has been unavailable in English for more than one hundred years. Largely neglected in the United States during the twentieth century, Humboldt’s contributions to the humanities and the sciences are now undergoing a revival to which this new translation will be a critical contribution.