American Literature and the Culture Wars

American Literature and the Culture Wars

Author: Gregory S. Jay

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501731273

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 360

Gregory S. Jay boldly challenges the future of American literary studies. Why pursue the study and teaching of a distinctly American literature? What is the appropriate purpose and scope of such pursuits? Is the notion of a traditional canon of great books out of date? Where does American literature leave off and Mexican or Caribbean or Canadian or postcolonial literature begin? Are today's campus conflicts fueled more by economics or ideology? Jay addresses these questions and others relating to American literary studies to explain why this once arcane academic discipline found itself so often in the news during the culture wars of the 1990s. While asking some skeptical questions about new directions and practices, Jay argues forcefully in favor of opening the borders of American literary and cultural analysis. He relates the struggle for representation in literary theory to a larger cultural clash over the meaning and justice of representation, then shows how this struggle might expand both the contents and the teaching of American literature. In an account of the vexed legacy of the Declaration of Independence, he provides a historical context for the current quarrels over literature and politics. Prominent among these debates are those over multiculturalism, which Jay takes up in an essay on the impasses of identity politics. In closing, he considers how the field of comparative American cultural studies might be constructed.

Culture Wars

Culture Wars

Author: Roger Chapman

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 9780765622501

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 768

View: 105

A collection of letters from a cross-section of Japanese citizens to a leading Japanese newspaper, relating their experiences and thoughts of the Pacific War.

American Literature in Transition, 1980–1990

American Literature in Transition, 1980–1990

Author: D. Quentin Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108246514

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 281

History has not been kind to the 1980s. The decade is often associated with absurd fashion choices, neo-Conservatism in the Reagan/Bush years, the AIDS crisis, Wall Street ethics, and uninspired television, film, and music. Yet the literature of the 1980s is undeniably rich and lasting. American Literature in Transition, 1980–1990 seeks to frame some of the decade's greatest achievements such as Toni Morrison's monumental novel Beloved and to consider some of the trends that began in the 1980s and developed thereafter, including the origins of the graphic novel, prison literature, and the opening of multiculturalism vis-à-vis the 'canon wars'. This volume argues not only for the importance of 1980s American literature, but also for its centrality in understanding trends and trajectories in all contemporary literature against the broader background of culture. This volume serves as both an introduction and a deep consideration of the literary culture of our most maligned decade.

Culture Wars in British Literature

Culture Wars in British Literature

Author: Tracy J. Prince

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786462940

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 878

The past century's culture wars that Britain has been consumed by, but that few North Americans seem aware of, have resulted in revised notions of Britishness and British literature. Yet literary anthologies remain anchored to an archaic Anglo-English interpretation of British literature. Conflicts have been played out over specific national vs. British identity (some residents prefer to describe themselves as being from Scotland, England, Wales, or Northern Ireland instead of Britain), in debates over immigration, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and in arguments over British literature. These debates are strikingly detailed in such chapters as: "The Difficulty Defining 'Black British'," "British Jewish Writers" and "Xenophobia and the Booker Prize." Connections are also drawn between civil rights movements in the U.S. and UK. This generalist cultural study is a lively read and a fascinating glimpse into Britain's changing identity as reflected in 20th and 21st century British literature.

Loose Canons

Loose Canons

Author: Henry Louis Gates

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195083507

Category: Computers

Page: 199

View: 402

Multiculturalism has been the subject of cover stories in Time and Newsweek and other newspapers and magazines around America. A leading literary and cultural critic, Gates says that the society we have made simply won't survive without the values of tolerance, and cultural tolerance comes to nothing without cultural understanding.

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

Author: Joseph Darda

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780520381445

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 551

Reuniting white America after Vietnam. "If war among the whites brought peace and liberty to the blacks," Frederick Douglass asked in 1875, peering into the nation's future, "what will peace among the whites bring?" The answer then and now, after the Civil War and civil rights, is a white reunion disguised as a veterans' reunion. How White Men Won the Culture Wars shows how a broad contingent of white men--conservative and liberal, hawk and dove, vet and non-vet--transformed the Vietnam War into a staging ground for a post-civil rights white racial reconciliation. Conservatives could celebrate white vets as deracinated embodiments of the nation. Liberals could treat them as minoritized heroes whose voices must be heard. Erasing Americans of color, Southeast Asians, and women from the war, white men argued that they had suffered and deserved more. The war became a vehicle for claiming entitlements and grievances after civil rights and feminism, in an age of color blindness and multiculturalism. From the POW/MIA and veterans' mental health movements to Rambo and "Born in the U.S.A.," white men remade their racial identities in the image of the Vietnam vet. No one wins in a culture war--except, Joseph Darda argues, white men dressed in army green.

European Culture Wars and the Italian Case

European Culture Wars and the Italian Case

Author: Luca Ozzano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317365471

Category: Political Science

Page: 252

View: 139

This book aims to understand the European political debate about contentious issues, framed in terms of religious values by religious and/or secular actors in 21st century. It specifically focuses on the Italian case, which, due to its peculiar history and contemporary political landscape, is a paradigmatic case for the study of the relationships between religion and politics. In recent years, a number of controversies related to religious issues have characterised the European public debate at both the EU and the national level. The ‘affaire du foulard’ in France, the referendum on abortion in Portugal, the recognition of same-sex marriages in many Western European States, the debate over bioethics and the regulation of euthanasia are only a few examples of contentious issues involving religion. This book aims to shed light on the interrelation between these different debates, as well as their broader meaning, through the analysis of the paradigmatic case of Italy. Italy summarizes and sometimes exasperates wider European trends, both because of the peculiar role traditionally played by the Vatican in Italian politics and for the rise, since the 1990s, of new political entrepreneurs eager to exploit ethical and civilizational issues. This work will be of great interest to scholars and students of a number of fields within the disciplines of political science, sociology and law, and will be useful for courses on religion and politics, political parties, social movements and civil society.

Culture Wars and Enduring American Dilemmas

Culture Wars and Enduring American Dilemmas

Author: Irene Taviss Thomson

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472022069

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 373

"Irene Taviss Thomson gives us a nuanced portrait of American social politics that helps explain both why we are drawn to the idea of a 'culture war' and why that misrepresents what is actually going on." ---Rhys H. Williams, Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology, Loyola University Chicago "An important work showing---beneath surface conflict---a deep consensus on a number of ideals by social elites." ---John H. Evans, Department of Sociology, University of California, San Diego The idea of a culture war, or wars, has existed in America since the 1960s---an underlying ideological schism in our country that is responsible for the polarizing debates on everything from the separation of church and state, to abortion, to gay marriage, to affirmative action. Irene Taviss Thomson explores this notion by analyzing hundreds of articles addressing hot-button issues over two decades from four magazines: National Review, Time, The New Republic, and The Nation, as well as a wide array of other writings and statements from a substantial number of public intellectuals. What Thomson finds might surprise you: based on her research, there is no single cultural divide or cultural source that can account for the positions that have been adopted. While issues such as religion, homosexuality, sexual conduct, and abortion have figured prominently in public discussion, in fact there is no single thread that unifies responses to each of these cultural dilemmas for any of the writers. Irene Taviss Thomson is Professor Emeritus of Sociology, having taught in the Department of Social Sciences and History at Fairleigh Dickinson University for more than 30 years. Previously, she taught in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University.

The Routledge Introduction to American War Literature

The Routledge Introduction to American War Literature

Author: Jennifer Haytock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317422624

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 128

War and violence have arguably been some of the strongest influences on literature, but the relation is complex: more than just a subject for story-telling, war tends to reshape literature and culture. Modern war literature necessarily engages with national ideologies, and this volume looks at the specificity of how American literature deals with the emotional, intellectual, social, political, and economic contradictions that evolve into and out of war. Raising questions about how American ideals of independence and gender affect representations of war while also considering how specifically American experiences of race and class interweave with representations of combat, this book is a rich and coherent introduction to these texts and critical debates.

The Big Smallness

The Big Smallness

Author: Michelle Ann Abate

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317362425

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 797

This book is the first full-length critical study to explore the rapidly growing cadre of amateur-authored, independently-published, and niche-market picture books that have been released during the opening decades of the twenty-first century. Emerging from a powerful combination of the ease and affordability of desktop publishing software; the promotional, marketing, and distribution possibilities allowed by the Internet; and the tremendous national divisiveness over contentious socio-political issues, these texts embody a shift in how narratives for young people are being creatively conceived, materially constructed, and socially consumed in the United States. Abate explores how titles such as My Parents Open Carry (about gun laws), It’s Just a Plant (about marijuana policy), and My Beautiful Mommy (about the plastic surgery industry) occupy important battle stations in ongoing partisan conflicts, while they are simultaneously changing the landscape of American children’s literature. The book demonstrates how texts like Little Zizi and Me Tarzan, You Jane mark the advent of not simply a new commercial strategy in texts for young readers; they embody a paradigm shift in the way that narratives are being conceived, constructed, and consumed. Niche market picture books can be seen as a telling barometer about public perceptions concerning children and the social construction of childhood, as well as the function of narratives for young readers in the twenty-first century. At the same time, these texts reveal compelling new insights about the complex interaction among American print culture, children’s reading practices, and consumer capitalism. Amateur-authored, self-published, and specialty-subject titles reveal the way in which children, childhood, and children’s literature are both highly political and heavily politicized in the United States. The book will be of interest to scholars and students in the fields of American Studies, children’s literature, childhood studies, popular culture, political science, microeconomics, psychology, advertising, book history, education, and gender studies.

Culture War?

Culture War?

Author: Morris P. Fiorina

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman

ISBN: 0205779883

Category: Political Science

Page: 275

View: 153

This text combines polling data with detailed narrative to debunk commonly-believed myths about American politics--particularly the claim that Americans are deeply divided in their fundamental political views.

Pop Culture Wars

Pop Culture Wars

Author: William D. Romanowski

Publisher: Intervarsity Press

ISBN: IND:30000056187481

Category: Religion

Page: 379

View: 819

William D. Romanowski brings a comprehensive, systematic, historically revealing and personally challenging Christian perspective to the contemporary debate over culture.