Amurath to Amurath

Amurath to Amurath

Author: Gertrude Bell

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN: 9781629172859

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 394

Gertrude Bell was an extraordinary woman who did what most women or men, even today, would dream of doing. Her travels opened doors to the Western world about the life and culture of the Middle East. This book traces her journey through Mesopotamia. It feels as fresh and energetic today, over 100 years later, as it did when it was first published in 1911. It also includes the short biography, “Queen of the Desert” by Fergus Mason.

Amurath to Amurath

Amurath to Amurath

Author: Gertrude Lowthian Bell

Publisher:

ISBN: 1695416546

Category:

Page: 360

View: 882

Traveller, archaeologist, mountaineer and diplomat, Gertrude Bell (1868-1926) poured her extraordinary talents into a series of adventures through Europe and the Middle East. Addressing her experiences in Persia and Syria respectively, Safar Nameh (1894) and The Desert and the Sown (1907) are both reissued in this series. The present work, first published in 1911 and among Bell's most acclaimed, describes her recent expedition to Mesopotamia. She recounts her outward journey to the Abbasid palace of Ukhaidir and her return via Baghdad and Asia Minor. Notably discussing changes in the region after the rise of the Young Turks, including their easing of restrictions throughout the declining Ottoman Empire, Bell also saw this book as 'the attempt to record the daily life, the speech of those who had inherited the empty ground where empires had risen and expired'. Replete with photographs, it vividly opens up Middle Eastern history and archaeology.

Amurath to Amurath

Amurath to Amurath

Author: Gertrude Lowthian 1868-1926 Bell

Publisher: Sagwan Press

ISBN: 134017054X

Category:

Page: 502

View: 835

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Amurath to Amurath

Amurath to Amurath

Author: Gertrude Bell

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1546918116

Category:

Page: 338

View: 769

Amurath to Amurath is the recollections of archaeologist Gertrude Bell's travels throughout the middle east during the early 20th century. Amurath to Amurath is the recollections of archaeologist Gertrude Bell's travels throughout the middle east during the early 20th century. Dozens of the original illustrations are included. It describes her experiences during her journey that took her along the Euphrates river from Aleppo to Hit, then to Karbala and Baghdad. Dozens of the original illustrations are included.

Amurath to Amurath

Amurath to Amurath

Author: Gertrude Bell

Publisher:

ISBN: 1706711840

Category:

Page: 372

View: 282

Traveller, archaeologist, mountaineer and diplomat, Gertrude Bell (1868-1926) poured her extraordinary talents into a series of adventures through Europe and the Middle East. Addressing her experiences in Persia and Syria respectively, Safar Nameh (1894) and The Desert and the Sown (1907) are both reissued in this series. The present work, first published in 1911 and among Bell's most acclaimed, describes her recent expedition to Mesopotamia. She recounts her outward journey to the Abbasid palace of Ukhaidir and her return via Baghdad and Asia Minor. Notably discussing changes in the region after the rise of the Young Turks, including their easing of restrictions throughout the declining Ottoman Empire, Bell also saw this book as 'the attempt to record the daily life, the speech of those who had inherited the empty ground where empires had risen and expired'. Replete with photographs, it vividly opens up Middle Eastern history and archaeology.Gertrude Margaret Lowthian Bell, CBE (14 July 1868 - 12 July 1926) was an English writer, traveller, political officer, administrator, and archaeologist who explored, mapped, and became highly influential to British imperial policy-making due to her knowledge and contacts, built up through extensive travels in Greater Syria, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, and Arabia. Along with T. E. Lawrence, Bell helped support the Hashemite dynasties in what is today Jordan as well as in Iraq.

A Female Poetics of Empire

A Female Poetics of Empire

Author: Julia Kuehn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134663064

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 974

Many well-known male writers produced fictions about colonial spaces and discussed the advantages of realism over romance, and vice versa, in the ‘art of fiction’ debate of the 1880s; but how did female writers contribute to colonial fiction? This volume links fictional, non-fictional and pictorial representations of a colonial otherness with the late nineteenth-century artistic concerns about representational conventions and possibilities. The author explores these texts and images through the postcolonial framework of ‘exoticism’, arguing that the epistemological dilemma of a ‘self’ encountering an ‘other’ results in the interrelated predicament to find poetic modalities – mimetic, realistic and documentary on the one hand; romantic, fantastic and picturesque on the other – that befit an ‘exotic’ representation. Thus women writers did not only participate in the making of colonial fictions but also in the late nineteenth-century artistic debate about the nature of fiction. This book maps the epistemological concerns of exoticism and of difference – self and other, home and away, familiarity and strangeness – onto the representational modes of realism and romance. The author focuses exclusively on female novelists, travel writers and painters of the turn-of-the-century exotic, and especially on neglected authors of academically under-researched genres such as the bestselling novel and the travelogue.