An Arabic-English Lexicon

An Arabic-English Lexicon

Author: Edward W. Lane

Publisher: Cosimo Incorporated

ISBN: 1616408979

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 3064

View: 774

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date.

A Dictionary of Iraqi Arabic

A Dictionary of Iraqi Arabic

Author: Beverly E. Clarity

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 0878401369

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 509

View: 583

Annotation Originally offered in two separate volumes, this staple of Georgetown University Press's world-renowned Arabic language program now handily provides both the English to Arabic and Arabic to English texts in one volume.

Arabic-English Dictionary

Arabic-English Dictionary

Author: Hans Wehr

Publisher: Snowballpublishing.com

ISBN: 1777257336

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 1130

View: 608

"This Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic (fourth edition) has been enlarged and amended with 13,000 new entries. It is the only authorized paperback edition of the famous Hans Wehr Arabic-English Dictionary, edited by J. Milton Cowan. This new edition has thousands of new entries include numerous additions and corrections to the material and presents the results in a single handsome volume. The author provides a useful introduction in which he discusses, clearly and precisely, the present state of the Arabic language. He points out the situations in which written and spoken varieties of Arabic are used, and remarks on the forces that influenced the development of the lexicon of Modern Arabic. He discusses both the purist movement with its normative tradition, and what might be called the laissez-faire actual usage of writers and journalists under the influence of Western modes of expression, of their everyday colloquial, or both. He then moves on to the problem of local terminology, especially for public institutions, offices, administrative matters, titles, and foods. Although such terms are included for most of the Arab countries, the list is not complete, as indeed the author recognizes (viii); readers of Arabic material characterized by a distinct regional coloring are advised to refer to dialect dictionaries and glossaries."

Arabic-English Lexicon

Arabic-English Lexicon

Author: Frederic P. Miller

Publisher: Alphascript Publishing

ISBN: 613071341X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 74

View: 883

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The Arabic-English Lexicon is a 19th-century Arabic dictionary compiled by the British Orientalist Edward William Lane. Writing in 1998, a critic says, Every serious classical Arabic scholar, for the last hundred years and more, has been indebted to Lane's work [the Lexicon]. In 1842, Lane, who had already won fame as an Arabist for his Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians and his version of the One Thousand and One Nights, received a sponsorship from Lord Prudhoe, later Duke of Northumberland, to compile an Arabic-English dictionary. Lane set to work at once, making his third voyage to Cairo to collect materials in the same year. Since the Muslim scholars there were reluctant to loan manuscripts to Lane, the acquisition of materials was commissioned to Ibrahim Al-Dasuqi (1811-1883), a graduate of Azhar and a teacher in Boulaq. In order to collect and collate the materials, Lane stayed in Cairo for seven years, working arduously with little rest and recreation. The acquisition of materials, which took 13 years, was left in the hands of Al-Dasuqi when Lane returned to England in 1849.