Approaches to Teaching Collodi's Pinocchio and Its Adaptations

Approaches to Teaching Collodi's Pinocchio and Its Adaptations

Author: Michael Sherberg

Publisher: Modern Language Assn of Amer

ISBN: STANFORD:36105114456994

Category: Education

Page: 179

View: 785

This volume, like others in the MLA's Approaches to Teaching World Literature series, is divided into two parts. Part 1, "Materials," gives the instructor bibliographic information on the text and contexts of the book, the critical literature, and audiovisual and electronic resources. Part 2, "Approaches," contains nineteen essays on teaching Pinocchio and its adaptations, which cover such topics as Collodi's life, society in post-Unification Italy, the gothic element, the Frankenstein theme, myths and archetypes, the influence of Ariosto and other writers, children's literature and censorship, the animal fable, and how the famous Disney movie is both a help and a hindrance in the classroom.

The Adventures of Pinocchio - A story for adults

The Adventures of Pinocchio - A story for adults

Author: Nicolae Sfetcu

Publisher: MultiMedia Publishing

ISBN: 9786060336709

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 635

One of the most widely read books in the world, considered a metaphor for the human condition, and suitable for a variety of interpretations, The Adventures of Pinocchio has had a major impact on world culture. The book responds to a prerogative that belongs only to masterpieces: that of being out of time. The book focuses on the psychological investigation of his central character Pinocchio, while trying to discover a humanity lost in the vacuum of technology and science. The myth of Pinocchio is used to condemn the culture of violence and consumerism. Collodi successfully uses metaphorical interactions, bipolarities, and ambiguous miracles. Pinocchio's identity is often played to the limit, imagined by himself and everyone he meets along the way. Pinocchio is the name of life that is simultaneously inorganic, human and animal. The Adventures of Pinocchio explore how experiences gained in heterotopic space give the individual the ability to change panoramic vision, and how these experiences can ultimately show us how we can recover or restore our existence as individual subjects. CONTENTS: Abstract Carlo Collodi The Adventures of Pinocchio Pinocchio The Myth The Psychology The Duality The Heterotopy The Identity Artificial Intelligence The Humanism The Becoming The Demiurge The Education Bibliography DOI: DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.20541.38887

The Adventures of Pinocchio - A Children's Book for Adults (Adnotated)

The Adventures of Pinocchio - A Children's Book for Adults (Adnotated)

Author: Carlo Collodi

Publisher: MultiMedia Publishing

ISBN: 9786060336693

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page:

View: 893

The Adventures of Pinocchio, by Carlo Collodi (1826–1890) Translated into English by Mary Alice Murray (1892) Published by T. Fisher Unwin, 1892 Illustrated by Enrico Mazzanti (1850–1910) Images and text used from Wikisource (Public Domain) A Children's Book for Adults, by Nicolae Sfetcu Translated by Nicolae Sfetcu from "Aventurile lui Pinocchio - O poveste pentru oameni mari" by Nicolae Sfetcu, Telework (10 decembrie 2021), DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.22089.67688, MultiMedia Publishing (ed.), ISBN: 978-606-033-666-2 The Adventures of Pinocchio recounts the adventures of an animated puppet named Pinocchio, who moves independently. He underwent transformations during the novel, and is often described as wearing a pointed hat, a jacket, and a pair of knee-length colored pants (called "caprietti"). Pinocchio's nose is his best-known feature. He grows taller when he tells a lie. The Adventures of Pinocchio focus on the psychological investigation of his central character, as he tries to discover a humanity lost in the vacuum of technology and science. The book can also be approached through the prism of the philosophy of mind, of the essential questions in this field. These questions are about personality and suffering. The common thread of Pinocchio's story is his desire to become a human being. In search of his identity, Pinocchio goes on an initiation journey. The problem of identity leads to the duality of mind / body, to what constitutes one's essence. To what extent do we remain the same when we change our appearance? Hence the story of an awareness of one's inner need. The puppet's desire to become human is one of the different literary manifestations of the animated / inanimate archetype, being loaded with different connotations and substrates of meaning. An archetypal story due to all its mythical, fairytale and religious references. Desire is the driving force that triggers the final metamorphosis, transforming inanimate matter into a living being. The puppet is, in this context, a metaphor for human formation and fulfillment as a citizen. One of the most widely read books in the world, considered a metaphor for the human condition, and suitable for a variety of interpretations, the novel has had a great impact on world culture. The book responds to a prerogative that belongs only to masterpieces: that of being out of time. CONTENTS: The Adventures of Pinocchio - I How it came to pass that Master Cherry the carpenter found a piece of wood that laughed and cried like a child. - II Master Cherry makes a present of the piece of wood to his friend Geppetto, who takes it to make for himself a wonderful puppet, that shall know how to dance, and to fence, and to leap like an acrobat. - III Geppetto having returned home begins at once to make a puppet, to which he gives the name of Pinocchio. The first tricks played by the puppet. - IV The story of Pinocchio and the Talking-cricket, from which we see that naughty boys cannot endure to be corrected by those who know more than they do. - V Pinocchio is hungry and searches for an egg to make himself an omelet; but just at the most interesting moment the omelet flies out of the window. - VI Pinocchio falls asleep with his feet on the brazier, and wakes in the morning to find them burnt off. - VII Geppetto returns home, makes the puppet new feet, and gives him the breakfast that the poor man had brought for himself. - VIII Geppetto makes Pinocchio new feet, and sells his own coat to buy him a Spelling-book. - IX Pinocchio sells his Spelling-book that he may go and see a puppet-show. - X The puppets recognise their brother Pinocchio, and receive him with delight; but at that moment their master Fire-eater makes his appearance and Pinocchio is in danger of coming to a bad end. - XI Fire-eater sneezes and pardons Pinocchio, who then saves the life of his friend Harlequin. - XII The showman Fire-eater makes Pinocchio a present of five gold pieces to take home to his father Geppetto: but Pinocchio instead allows himself to be taken in by the Fox and the Cat, and goes with them. - XIII The inn of The Red Craw-fish. - XIV Pinocchio, because he would not heed the good counsels of the Talking-cricket, falls amongst assassins. - XV The assassins pursue Pinocchio; and having overtaken him hang him to a branch of the Big Oak. - XVI The beautiful Child with blue hair has the puppet taken down: has him put to bed and calls in three doctors to know if he is alive or dead. - XVII Pinocchio eats the sugar, but will not take his medicine: when, however, he sees the grave-diggers, who have arrived to carry him away, he takes it. He then tells a lie, and as a punishment his nose grows longer. - XVIII Pinocchio meets again the Fox and the Cat, and goes with them to bury his money in the Field of miracles. - XIX Pinocchio is robbed of his money, and as a punishment he is sent to prison for four months. - XX Liberated from prison, he starts to return to the Fairy's house; but on the road he meets with a horrible serpent, and afterwards he is caught in a trap. - XXI Pinocchio is taken by a peasant, who obliges him to fill the place of his watch-dog in the poultry-yard. - XXII Pinocchio discovers the robbers, and as a reward for his fidelity is set at liberty. - XXIII Pinocchio mourns the death of the beautiful Child with the blue hair. He then meets with a pigeon who flies with him to the seashore, and there he throws himself into the water to go to the assistance of his father Geppetto. - XXIV Pinocchio arrives at the island of the 'Industrious Bees,' and finds the Fairy again. - XXV Pinocchio promises the Fairy to be good and studious, for he is quite sick of being a puppet and wishes to become an exemplary boy. - XXVI Pinocchio accompanies his schoolfellows to the sea-shore to see the terrible Dog-fish. - XXVII Great fight between Pinocchio and his companions. One of them is wounded, and Pinocchio is arrested by the gendarmes. - XXVIII Pinocchio is in danger of being fried in a frying-pan like a fish. - XXIX He returns to the Fairy's house. She promises him that the following day he shall cease to be a puppet and shall become a boy. Grand breakfast of coffee and milk to celebrate this great event. - XXX Pinocchio, instead of becoming a boy, starts secretly with his friend Candlewick for the 'Land of Boobies.' - XXXI After five months' residence in the land of Cocagne, Pinocchio, to his great astonishment, grows a beautiful pair of donkey's ears, and he becomes a little donkey, tail and all. - XXXII Pinocchio gets donkey's ears; and then he becomes a real little donkey and begins to bray. - XXXIII Pinocchio, having become a genuine little donkey, is taken to be sold, and is bought by the director of a company of buffoons to be taught to dance, and to jump through hoops: but one evening he lames himself, and then he is bought by a man who purposes to make a drum of his skin. - XXXIV Pinocchio having been thrown into the sea is eaten by the fish and becomes a puppet as he was before. Whilst he is swimming away to save his life he is swallowed by the terrible Dog-fish. - XXXV Pinocchio finds in the body of the Dog-fish . . . whom does he find? Read this chapter and you will know. - XXXVI Pinocchio at last ceases to be a puppet and becomes a boy. A Children's Book for Adults - Carlo Collodi - The Adventures of Pinocchio - Pinocchio - The Myth - The Psychology - The Duality - The Heterotopy - The Identity - Artificial Intelligence - The Humanism - The Becoming - The Demiurge - The Education - Bibliography Publishing House - MultiMedia Publishing

The Fabulous Journeys of Alice and Pinocchio

The Fabulous Journeys of Alice and Pinocchio

Author: Laura Tosi

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476631943

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 237

View: 872

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871) and Carlo Collodi’s Le Avventure di Pinocchio (1883) are among the most influential classics of children’s literature. Firmly rooted in their respective British and Italian national cultures, the Alice and Pinocchio stories connected to a worldwide audience almost like folktales and fairy tales and have become fixtures of postmodernism. Although they come from radically different political and social backgrounds, the texts share surprising similarities. This comparative reading explores their imagery and history, and discusses them in the broader context of British and Italian children’s stories.

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Author: Katia Pizzi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136620508

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 729

This study assesses the significance of Pinocchio in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in addition to his status as the creature of a nineteenth century traversed by a cultural enthusiasm for dummies, puppets, and marionettes. This collection identifies him as a figure characterized by a 'fluid identity,' informed with transition, difference, joie de vivre, otherness, displacement, and metamorphosis, making Pinocchio a truly modern, indeed postmodern and posthuman, cultural icon. Pinocchio, Puppets and Modernity explores this crucial and as yet little visited field, reassessing Pinocchio's genealogy and progeny, as well as illuminating both the wider context and more specific cultural manifestations of the mechanical-human interface in the domains of theatre, the fine arts, literature, radio, and even virtual reality coherently with the digital metamorphosis of our times. The wide-ranging scope of this exploration encompasses Italian, French, and English literature, dummies and marionettes in modernist and contemporary theatre, the fairytale tradition, and traditional and contemporary painting, as well as the older and newer media of radio, television, cinema, and the Internet. The diverse, comparative, and multimedia focus of this original discussion testifies to the enduring transcultural legacy of Pinocchio. Eminently sellable as a traditional cultural icon, Pinocchio is equally impactful and relevant for a globalized, multicultural, and virtual society, from Collodi to Disney and beyond. Katia Pizzi is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. She has published volumes on cultural identities, including A City in Search of an Author (2001) and The Cultural Identities of European Cities (2010), and on children's literature and illustration.

Gothic Peregrinations

Gothic Peregrinations

Author: Agnieszka ?owczanin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429859700

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 669

For over two hundred years, the Gothic has remained fixed in the European and American imaginations, steadily securing its position as a global cultural mode in recent decades. The globalization of Gothic studies has resulted in the proliferation of new critical concepts and a growing academic interest in the genre. Yet, despite its longevity, unprecedented expansion, and accusations of prescriptiveness, the Gothic remains elusive and without a straightforward definition. Gothic Peregrinations: The Unexplored and Re-explored Territories looks at Gothic productions largely marginalized in the studies of the genre, including the European absorption of and response to the Gothic. This collection of essays identifies landmarks and ley lines in the insufficiently probed territories of Gothic scholarship and sets out to explore its unmapped regions. This volume not only examines Gothic peregrinations from a geographical perspective but also investigates how the genre has been at odds with strict demarcation of generic boundaries. Analyzing texts which come from outside the Gothic canon, yet prove to be deeply indebted to it, like bereavement memoirs, stories produced by and about factory girls of Massachusetts, and the Mattel Monster High franchise, this volume illuminates the previously unexplored fields in Gothic studies. The chapters in this volume reveal the truly transnational expansion of the Gothic and the importance of exchange – exchange now seen not only as crucial to the genre’s gestation, or vital to the processes of globalization, but also to legitimizing Gothic studies in the global world.

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Anton Chekhov

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Anton Chekhov

Author: Michael C. Finke

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN: 9781603292696

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 248

View: 339

Chekhov's works are unflinching in the face of human frailty. With their emphasis on the dignity and value of individuals during unique moments, they help us better understand how to exist with others when we are fundamentally alone. Written in Russia at the end of the nineteenth century, when the country began to move fitfully toward industrialization and grappled with the influence of Western liberalism even as it remained an autocracy, Chekhov's plays and stories continue to influence contemporary writers. The essays in this volume provide classroom strategies for teaching Chekhov's stories and plays, discuss how his medical training and practice related to his literary work, and compare Chekhov with writers both Russian and American. The volume also aims to help instructors with the daunting array of new editions in English, as well as with the ever-growing list of titles in visual media: filmed theater productions of his plays, adaptations of the plays and stories scripted for film, and amateur performances freely available online.

Metamorphosing Dante

Metamorphosing Dante

Author: Fabio Camilletti

Publisher: Series Cultural Inquiry

ISBN: 9783851326178

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 414

View: 111

After almost seven centuries, Dante endures and even seems to haunt the present. Metamorphosing Dante explores what so many authors, artists and thinkers from varied backgrounds have found in Dante’s oeuvre, and the ways in which they have engaged with it through rewritings, dialogues, and transpositions. By establishing trans-disciplinary routes, the volume shows that, along with a corpus of multiple linguistic and narrative structures, characters, and stories, Dante has provided a field of tensions in which to mirror and investigate one’s own time. Authors explored include Samuel Beckett, Walter Benjamin, André Gide, Derek Jarman, LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka, James Joyce, Wolfgang Koeppen, Jacques Lacan, Thomas Mann, James Merrill, Eugenio Montale, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Cesare Pavese, Giorgio Pressburger, Robert Rauschenberg, Vittorio Sereni, Virginia Woolf.

Modernism and the Avant-garde Body in Spain and Italy

Modernism and the Avant-garde Body in Spain and Italy

Author: Nicolás Fernández-Medina

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317434078

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 104

This interdisciplinary volume interrogates bodily thinking in avant-garde texts from Spain and Italy during the early twentieth century and their relevance to larger modernist preoccupations with corporeality. It examines the innovative ways Spanish and Italian avant-gardists explored the body as a locus for various aesthetic and sociopolitical considerations and practices. In reimagining the nexus points where the embodied self and world intersect, the texts surveyed in this book not only shed light on issues such as authority, desire, fetishism, gender, patriarchy, politics, religion, sexuality, subjectivity, violence, and war during a period of unprecedented change, but also explore the complexities of aesthetic and epistemic rupture (and continuity) within Spanish and Italian modernisms. Building on contemporary scholarship in Modernist Studies and avant-garde criticism, this volume brings to light numerous cross-cultural touch points between Spain and Italy, and challenges the center/periphery frameworks of European cultural modernism. In linking disciplines, genres, —isms, and geographical spheres, the book provides new lenses through which to explore the narratives of modernist corporeality. Each contribution centers around the question of the body as it was actively being debated through the medium of poetic, literary, and artistic exchange, exploring the body in its materiality and form, in its sociopolitical representation, relation to Self, cultural formation, spatiality, desires, objectification, commercialization, and aesthetic functions. This comparative approach to Spanish and Italian avant-gardism offers readers an expanded view of the intersections of body and text, broadening the conversation in the larger fields of cultural modernism, European Avant-garde Studies, and Comparative Literature.

Italian Children’s Literature and National Identity

Italian Children’s Literature and National Identity

Author: Maria Truglio

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351987554

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 870

This book bridges the fields of Children’s Literature and Italian Studies by examining how turn-of-the-century children’s books forged a unified national identity for the new Italian State. Through contextualized close readings of a wide range of texts, Truglio shows how the 19th-century concept of recapitulation, which held that ontogeny (the individual’s development) repeats phylogeny (the evolution of the species), underlies the strategies of this corpus. Italian fairy tales, novels, poems, and short stories imply that the personal development of the child corresponds to and hence naturalizes the modernizing development of the nation. In the context of Italy’s uneven and ambivalent modernization, these narrative trajectories are enabled by a developmental melancholia. Using a psychoanalytic lens, and in dialogue with recent Anglophone Children’s Literature criticism, this study proposes that national identity was constructed via a process of renouncing and incorporating paternal and maternal figures, rendered as compulsory steps into maturity and modernity. With chapters on the heroic figure of Garibaldi, the Orientalized depiction of the South, and the role of girls in formation narratives, this book discloses how melancholic itineraries produced gendered national subjects. This study engages both well-known Italian texts, such as Collodi’s The Adventures of Pinocchio and De Amicis’ Heart, and books that have fallen into obscurity by authors such as Baccini, Treves, Gianelli, and Nuccio. Its approach and corpus shed light on questions being examined by Italianists, Children’s Literature scholars, and social and cultural historians with an interest in national identity formation.

Approaches to Teaching the Works of John Dryden

Approaches to Teaching the Works of John Dryden

Author: Jayne Lewis

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN: 9781603291675

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 365

Which John Dryden should be brought into the twenty-first-century college classroom? The rehabilitator of the ancients? The first of the moderns? The ambivalent laureate? The sidelined convert to Rome? The literary theorist? The translator? The playwright? The poet? This volume in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature addresses the tensions, contradictions, and versatility of a writer who, in the words of Samuel Johnson, "found [English poetry] brick, and left it marble," who was, in the words of Walter Scott, "one of the greatest of our masters." Part 1, "Materials," offers a guide to the teaching editions of Dryden's work and a discussion of the background resources, from biographies and literary criticism to social, cultural, political, and art histories. In part 2, "Approaches," essays describe different pedagogical entries into Dryden and his time. These approaches cover subjects as various as genre, adaptation, literary rivalry, musical setting, and political and religious poetry in classroom situations that range from the traditional survey to learning through performance.