Birmingham in the Great War: Mobilisation and Recruitment

Birmingham in the Great War: Mobilisation and Recruitment

Author: Terry Carter

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473865839

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 647

How the experience of war impacted on the town, from the initial enthusiasm for sorting out the German Kaiser in time for Christmas 1914, to the gradual realization of the enormity of human sacrifice the families of Birmingham were committed to as the war stretched out over the next four years. A record of the growing disillusion of the people, their tragedies and hardships and a determination to see it through. Birmingham’s part in the Great War is well documented from the production of Rifles and Lewis Guns at the B.S.A. to the mind boggling 25 million rifle cartridges produced weekly at Kynochs. Airplanes, tanks, armored cars, military trucks, shell fuses, shell cases, Mills bombs and hundreds of other intricate parts needed to make military hardware. “The country, the empire and the world owe to the skill, the ingenuity, the industry and the resource of Birmingham a deep debt of gratitude,” to quote Prime Minister Lloyd George and former Minister of Munitions. But that is only part of the story. Around 150,000 Birmingham men enlisted and sadly approximately 14,000 did not return. No story of Birmingham’s war effort can be told without mentioning the wives, moms, sisters and girlfriends who toiled away night and day working in munitions. Four years of local war time newspapers have been trawled through unearthing personal experiences of Brummagem folk in the Great War.

The Silversmith's Daughter

The Silversmith's Daughter

Author: Annie Murray

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781509841561

Category: Fiction

Page: 390

View: 825

Courage, passion, ambition and tragedy under the storm clouds of war from the top ten bestselling author. It is 1915 and Daisy Tallis, headstrong, impassioned and a talented young silversmith, is desperate to make her parents proud. The family business is at the very heart of Birmingham’s jewellery quarter community. Daisy, having studied at the city’s celebrated School of Jewellery and Silversmithing, is now skilled enough to be a teacher. It is at the school that she meets her father’s notorious rival, James Carson. Although he’s a married man, Daisy finds herself dangerously drawn to his flattery. As war tightens its grip on the country, the jewellery quarter is thrown into turmoil as the men are forced to decide who will enlist. When tragedy strikes, can Daisy and her mother find what it takes to hold both the business and the family together? ‘Full of drama, love and compassion’ Take a Break ‘A tale of passion and empathy that will keep you hooked’ Woman’s Own

Alfred Herbert Ltd and the British Machine Tool Industry, 1887-1983

Alfred Herbert Ltd and the British Machine Tool Industry, 1887-1983

Author: Roger Lloyd-Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351959575

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 361

At the beginning of the twentieth century Britain was amongst the world leaders in the production of machine tools, yet by the 1980s the industry was in terminal decline. Focusing on the example of Britain's largest machine tool maker, Alfred Herbert Ltd of Coventry, this study charts the wider fortunes of this vital part of the manufacturing sector. Taking a chronological approach, the book explores how during the late nineteenth century the industry developed a reputation for excellence throughout the world, before the challenges of two world wars necessitated drastic changes and reorganisations. Despite meeting these challenges and emerging with confidence into the post-war market place, the British machine tool industry never regained its pre-eminent position, and increasingly lost ground to foreign competition. By using the example of Alfred Herbert Ltd to illuminate the broader economic and business history of the British machine tool industry, this study not only provides a valuable insight into British manufacturing, but also contributes to the ongoing debates surrounding Britain's alleged decline as a manufacturing nation.

British Theatre and the Great War, 1914 - 1919

British Theatre and the Great War, 1914 - 1919

Author: Andrew Maunder

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137402004

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 303

View: 325

British Theatre and the Great War examines how theatre in its various forms adapted itself to the new conditions of 1914-1918. Contributors discuss the roles played by the theatre industry. They draw on a range of source materials to show the different kinds of theatrical provision and performance cultures in operation not only in London but across parts of Britain and also in Australia and at the Front. As well as recovering lost works and highlighting new areas for investigation (regional theatre, prison camp theatre, troop entertainment, the threat from film, suburban theatre) the book offers revisionist analysis of how the conflict and its challenges were represented on stage at the time and the controversies it provoked. The volume offers new models for exploring the topic in an accessible, jargon-free way, and it shows how theatrical entertainment of the time can be seen as the `missing link’ in the study of First World War writing.

Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Author: Thierry Terret

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135760885

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 312

View: 338

The Great War has been largely ignored by historians of sport. However sport was an integral part of cultural conditioning into both physiological and psychological military efficiency in the decades leading up to it. It is time to acknowledge that the Great War also had an influence on sport in post-war European culture. Both are neglected topics. Sport, Militarism and the Great War deals with four significant aspects of the relationship between sport and war before, during and immediately after the 1914-1918 conflict. First, it explores the creation and consolidation of the cult of martial heroism and chivalric self-sacrifice in the pre-war era. Second, it examines the consequences of the mingling of soldiers from various nations on later sport. Third, it considers the role of the Great War in the transformation of the leisure of the masses. Finally, it examines the links between war, sport and male socialisation. The Great War contributed to a redefinition of European masculinity in the post-war period. The part sport played in this redefinition receives attention. Sport, Militarism and the Great War is in two parts: the Continental (Part I) and the "Anglo-Saxon" (Part II). No study has adopted this bilateral approach to date. Thus, in conception and execution, it is original. With its originality of content and the approaching centenary of the advent of the Great War in 2014, it is anticipated that the book will capture a wide audience. This book was originally published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport.

The Academic World in the Era of the Great War

The Academic World in the Era of the Great War

Author: Marie-Eve Chagnon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349952663

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 590

This book examines the ways in which scholarly expertise was mobilized during the First World War, and the consequences of this for the inter-connected academic world that had developed in the late nineteenth century. Adopting a strong international approach, the contributors to this volume examine the impact of the War on individuals, institutions, and disciplines, cumulatively demonstrating the strong afterlife of conflict for scholarly practices and academic communities across Europe and North America, in the decades following the cessation of the Great War.

The Last Great War

The Last Great War

Author: Adrian Gregory

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107650862

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 694

What was it that the British people believed they were fighting for in 1914–18? This compelling history of the British home front during the First World War offers an entirely new account of how British society understood and endured the war. Drawing on official archives, memoirs, diaries and letters, Adrian Gregory sheds new light on the public reaction to the war, examining the role of propaganda and rumour in fostering patriotism and hatred of the enemy. He shows the importance of the ethic of volunteerism and the rhetoric of sacrifice in debates over where the burdens of war should fall as well as the influence of religious ideas on wartime culture. As the war drew to a climax and tensions about the distribution of sacrifices threatened to tear society apart, he shows how victory and the processes of commemoration helped create a fiction of a society united in grief.

Philanthropy and Voluntary Action in the First World War

Philanthropy and Voluntary Action in the First World War

Author: Peter Grant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134500314

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 185

This book challenges scholarship which presents charity and voluntary activity during World War I as marking a downturn from the high point of the late Victorian period. Charitable donations rose to an all-time peak, and the scope and nature of charitable work shifted decisively. Far more working class activists, especially women, became involved, although there were significant differences between the suburban south and industrial north of England and Scotland. The book also corrects the idea that charitably-minded civilians’ efforts alienated the men at the front, in contrast to the degree of negativity that surrounds much previous work on voluntary action in this period. Far from there being an unbridgeable gap in understanding or empathy between soldiers and civilians, the links were strong, and charitable contributions were enormously important in maintaining troop morale. This bond significantly contributed to the development and maintenance of social capital in Britain, which, in turn, strongly supported the war effort. This work draws on previously unused primary sources, notably those regarding the developing role of the UK’s Director General of Voluntary Organizations and the regulatory legislation of the period.

Aspects of Birmingham

Aspects of Birmingham

Author: Brian Hall

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781871647679

Category: Birmingham (England)

Page: 401

View: 408

There are now over 25 books published as part of the Aspects Series, each one taking readers on a voyage of nostalgic discovery through their town, city or area. Here Birmingham, once 'The Workshop of the Empire' is revealed in twelve studies of the city and its people. Here we find 'Birmingham Municipal Bank', the only successful council operated bank and 'Lesser Known Characters' about the city. We see the work of the 'Birmingham Mission' and 'Birmingham Children's Emigration Homes'. During the troubled 1930's, Birmingham held a 'Great Pageant' and as war clouds gathered over Europe, the city's young men fought in 'The Spanish Civil War'. All this and so much more is available in this, the first Aspects of Birmingham.