British Aircraft Carriers

British Aircraft Carriers

Author: David Hobbs

Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

ISBN: 9781848321380

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 785

This book is a meticulously detailed history of British aircraft-carrying ships from the earliest experimental vessels to the Queen Elizabeth class, currently under construction and the largest ships ever built for the Royal Navy. Individual chapters cover the design and construction of each class, with full technical details, and there are extensive summaries of every ship's career. Apart from the obvious large-deck carriers, the book also includes seaplane carriers, escort carriers and MAC ships, the maintenance ships built on carrier hulls, unbuilt projects, and the modern LPH. It concludes with a look at the future of naval aviation, while numerous appendices summarise related subjects like naval aircraft, recognition markings and the circumstances surrounding the loss of every British carrier. As befits such an important reference work, it is heavily illustrated with a magnificent gallery of photos and plans, including the first publication of original plans in full colour, one on a magnificent gatefold.??Written by the leading historian of British carrier aviation, himself a retired Fleet Air Arm pilot, it displays the authority of a lifetime's research combined with a practical understanding of the issues surrounding the design and operation of aircraft carriers. As such British Aircraft Carriers is certain to become the standard work on the subject.

British Aircraft Carriers 1939–45

British Aircraft Carriers 1939–45

Author: Angus Konstam

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781849080804

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 993

With war against Germany looming, Britain pushed forward its carrier program in the late 1930s. In 1938, the Royal Navy launched the HMS Ark Royal, its first-ever purpose-built aircraft carrier. This was quickly followed by others, including the highly-successful Illustrious class. Smaller and tougher than their American cousins, the British carriers were designed to fight in the tight confines of the North Sea and the Mediterranean. Over the next six years, these carriers battled the Axis powers in every theatre, attacking Italian naval bases, hunting the Bismark, and even joining the fight in the Pacific. This book tells the story of the small, but resilient, carriers and the crucial role they played in the British war effort.

The British Carrier Strike Fleet after 1945

The British Carrier Strike Fleet after 1945

Author: David Hobbs

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781848324121

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 777

“A comprehensive study of the bittersweet post WWII history of British naval aviation . . . will become a standard reference for its subject.”—Firetrench In 1945 the most powerful fleet in the Royal Navy’s history was centered on nine aircraft carriers. This book charts the post-war fortunes of this potent strike force; its decline in the face of diminishing resources, its final fall at the hands of uncomprehending politicians, and its recent resurrection in the form of the Queen Elizabeth class carriers, the largest ships ever built for the Royal Navy. After 1945 “experts” prophesied that nuclear weapons would make conventional forces obsolete, but British carrier-borne aircraft were almost continuously employed in numerous conflicts as far apart as Korea, Egypt, the Persian Gulf, the South Atlantic, East Africa and the Far East, often giving successive British Governments options when no others were available. In the process the Royal Navy invented many of the techniques and devices crucial to modern carrier operations angled decks, steam catapults and deck-landing aids while also pioneering novel forms of warfare like helicopter-borne assault, and tactics for countering such modern plagues as insurgency and terrorism. This book combines narratives of these poorly understood operations with a clear analysis of the strategic and political background, benefiting from the author's personal experience of both carrier flying and the workings of Whitehall. It is an important but largely untold story, of renewed significance as Britain once again embraces carrier aviation. “Makes a timely and welcome appearance . . . will make compelling reading for those with serious concern for our naval affairs.”—St. Andrews in Focus

British Aircraft Carriers

British Aircraft Carriers

Author: David Hobbs

Publisher: US Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1591140749

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 489

This book is a meticulously detailed history of British aircraft-carrying ships from the earliest experimental vessels to the Queen Elizabeth class, currently under construction and the largest ships ever built for the Royal Navy. Individual chapters cover the design and construction of each class, with full technical details, and there are extensive summaries of every ship's career. Apart from the obvious large-deck carriers, the book also includes seaplane carriers, escort carriers and MAC ships, the maintenance ships built on carrier hulls, unbuilt projects, and the modern LPH. It concludes with a look at the future of naval aviation, while numerous appendices summarize related subjects like naval aircraft, recognition markings and the circumstances surrounding the loss of every British carrier. As befits such an important reference work, it is heavily illustrated with a magnificent gallery of photos and plans, some reproduced in color. Written by the leading historian of British carrier aviation, himself a retired Fleet Air Arm pilot, it displays the authority of a lifetime's research combined with a practical understanding of the issues surrounding the design and operation of aircraft carriers. British Aircraft Carriers is certain to become the standard work on the subject.

The British Aircraft Carrier HMS Ark Royal

The British Aircraft Carrier HMS Ark Royal

Author: Witold Koszela

Publisher: Top Drawings

ISBN: 8365437090

Category: History

Page:

View: 840

The British aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal was one of the most famous and recognizable Royal Navy vessels of the Second World War. Built as the first large and modern aircraft carrier she was a true pride of Albion's fleet, equal to the mightiest warship of her time - the battlecruiser HMS Hood. Moreover, her design and construction introduced entirely new standards in construction of aircraft carriers for the Royal Navy, giving her a specific place in shipbuilding history.

British Carrier Aviation

British Carrier Aviation

Author: Norman Friedman

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN: UOM:39015014459799

Category: Aircraft carriers

Page: 384

View: 898

A complete record of the history of British carrier and their aircraft. An abundance of photos and drawings make this work an interesting and valuable reference tool. The text by Friedman, a well known naval expert, is exciting reading. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Ju 87 Stuka vs Royal Navy Carriers

Ju 87 Stuka vs Royal Navy Carriers

Author: Robert Forsyth

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472840844

Category: History

Page: 80

View: 234

Ju 87 dive-bombers, originally developed for pin-pointing bombing missions against land targets and Allied naval vessels were deployed by both the Luftwaffe and the Regia Aeronautica against the Allied forces. Included in such a target were perhaps the greatest prize of all for a Stuka pilot: a British aircraft carrier. This superbly illustrated book looks at the duel between the Ju 87 Stuka and the aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy. Despite their gun protection ('pompoms')and their squadrons of fighters, these immense and mighty vessels proved irresistible targets to determined and experienced Stuka aces as they endeavoured to stop British naval intervention in the campaigns in Norway, Malta and Crete. By 1941, the Ju 87 had become known by the British as a fearsome aircraft following its operations in France, specifically at Dunkirk, as well as in the Balkans. For the Luftwaffe, it was an aircraft in which they still had great confidence despite its mauling in the Battle of Britain during the summer of 1940. This book examines the key attributes and shortcomings of both aircraft and carrier by analysing various compelling episodes including the dramatic attacks on Ark Royal by Stukageschwader (St.G) 1 off Norway in April 1940, the strikes by the Luftwaffe's St.G 1, St.G 2 and the Regia Aeronautica's 237° Squadriglia against Illustrious in Malta harbour. Aside from outstanding photography and artwork, this volume also include numerous personal accounts from Stuka crews, the pilots of carrier-borne fighters opposing them and the sailors embarked in the various carriers that came under attack.

Innovation in Carrier Aviation

Innovation in Carrier Aviation

Author: U. S. Military

Publisher:

ISBN: 1521241589

Category:

Page: 180

View: 292

This exceptional book examines the watershed period in carrier development that occurred immediately following World War II, when design advances were made that would be crucial to the centrality in national-security policy making that carriers and naval aviation have today. In those years several major technological breakthroughs-notably the jet engine and nuclear weapons-raised large questions about the future and led to an array of innovations in the design and operational utilization of aircraft carriers. Central to this story is the collaboration between the aviation communities in the navies of the United States and Great Britain during these years, building on the intimate relationship they had developed during the war itself. Strikingly, the most important of these innovations, notably the angled flight deck and steam catapult, originated with the British, not the Americans. This study thereby also provides interesting lessons for the U.S. Navy today with respect to its commitment to maritime security cooperation in the context of its new "maritime strategy." It is a welcome and important addition to the historiography of the Navy in the seminal years of the Cold War. CHAPTER ONE - BuAer before World War II * CHAPTER TWO - BuAer in World War II * CHAPTER THREE - The Potential of the Big Bomber * CHAPTER FOUR - Royal Navy Wartime Experience and Analysis * CHAPTER FIVE - Adopting Jet Engines * CHAPTER SIX - British and American Prospects after the War * CHAPTER SEVEN - The Flexdeck * CHAPTER EIGHT - Catapults: Choosing an Option under Pressure * CHAPTER NINE - Analysis The study on which this monograph is based was commissioned by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Net Assessment) in the fall of 2006 as part of that office's longstanding support for studies of military innovation. In some sense, the OSD(NA) project was a follow-on to an earlier study by the present coauthors, published in 1999 as American & British Aircraft Carrier Development, 1919-1941 by the Naval Institute Press. In the mid-1980s, Andrew Marshall, the director of the Office of Net Assessment in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, encouraged a number of investigators to examine cases of innovation in the U.S. armed forces and in the armed forces of other countries. His encouragement, coupled with the financial support of his office, led to a number of studies, among which was the book American & British Aircraft Carrier Development, 1919-1941 (Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1999), written by the authors of the study that you are about to read. The success of American & British Aircraft Carrier Development, 1919-1941 led Mr. Marshall to ask whether we might examine the development of the modern aircraft carrier after World War II. We already knew that the three essential innovations-the steam catapult, the angled flight deck, and the optical landing aid - had been developed first in Great Britain for and by the Royal Navy. Then all three innovations had been picked up by the U.S. Navy. But why, Mr. Marshall wanted to know, had the Royal Navy developed these innovations first? He asked us to come together and answer that question, as well as the related question of how these innovations were "transferred" so quickly to the U.S. Navy. Mr. Marshall's interest was in the process of innovation and in how innovations spread. We have tried to find answers to his questions.

Land Based Air Power or Aircraft Carriers?

Land Based Air Power or Aircraft Carriers?

Author: Gjert Lage Dyndal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317108405

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 817

During the 1960s - in the midst of its retreat from empire - the British government had to grapple with complex political and military problems in order to find a strategic defence policy that was both credible and affordable. Addressing what was perhaps the most contentious issue within those debates, this book charts the arguments that raged between supporters of a land based air power strategy, and those who favoured aircraft carriers. Drawing upon a wealth of previously classified documents, the book reveals how the Admiralty and Air Ministry became interlocked in a bitter political struggle over which of their military strategies could best meet Britain's future foreign policy challenges. Whilst the broad story of this inter-service rivalry is well known - the Air Force's proposal for a series of island based airfields, and the Navy championing of a small number of expensive but mobile aircraft carriers - the complexity and previous lack of archival sources means that it has, until now, only ever been partially researched and understood. Former studies have largely focused on the cancellation of the CVA-01 carrier programme, and offered little depth as regards the Royal Air Force perspectives. Given that this was a two-Service rivalry, which greatly influenced many aspects of British foreign and defence policy decisions of the period, this book presents an important and balanced overview of the complex issues involved. Through this historical study of the British debate about maritime air power and strategic alternatives in the 1960s, the detailed arguments used for and against both alternatives demonstrate clear relevance to both historical and contemporary conceptual debates on carrier forces and land-based air power. Both from military strategy and inter-service relationship perspectives, contemporary Britain and many other nations with maritime forces may learn much from this historical case.

Fleet Air Arm Carrier War

Fleet Air Arm Carrier War

Author: Kev Darling

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473814325

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 761

This is the story of British naval flying from aircraft carriers, from its conception in World War One to the present day. It includes the types of aircraft and the men who flew them, the carriers and the evolution of their designs, the theatres of war in which they served and their notable achievements and tragedies. It traces navy flying from the early days of the biplane, through the rapid developments during World War Two to the post-war introduction of jet-powered flight. The British inventions of the angled flight deck and later vertical landing jets revolutionised sea warfare and allowed the carrier to play a vital part in many recent land wars when naval aircraft flew in support of Allied land forces.Although the British carriers have always been smaller than their American counterparts, the Royal Navy and its aircraft have always been in the van of the development of ships and aircraft. This is the proud history of British Naval flying and ships such as HMS Eagle, HMS Hermes, HMS Glorious, HMS Ark Royal and many more.