Community-based Archaeology

Community-based Archaeology

Author: Sonya Atalay

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520273351

Category: Social Science

Page: 327

View: 352

"Community Based Participatory Research in archaeology finally comes of age with Atalay's long-anticipated volume. She promotes a collaborative approach to knowledge gathering, interpretation, and use that benefits descendant communities and archaeological practitioners, contributing to a more relevant, rewarding, and responsible archaeology. This is essential reading for anyone who asks why we do archaeology, for whom, and how best can it be done." - George Nicholas, author of Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists "Sonya Atalay shows archaeologists how the process of Community Based Participatory Research can move our efforts at collaboration with local communities beyond theory and good intentions to a sustainable practice. This is a game-changing book that every archaeologist must read." - Randall H. McGuire, author of Archaeology as Political Action

Community-Based Archaeology

Community-Based Archaeology

Author: Sonya Atalay

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520273368

Category: Social Science

Page: 326

View: 349

“Community Based Participatory Research in archaeology finally comes of age with Atalay’s long-anticipated volume. She promotes a collaborative approach to knowledge gathering, interpretation, and use that benefits descendant communities and archaeological practitioners, contributing to a more relevant, rewarding, and responsible archaeology. This is essential reading for anyone who asks why we do archaeology, for whom, and how best can it be done.” – George Nicholas, author of Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists “Sonya Atalay shows archaeologists how the process of Community Based Participatory Research can move our efforts at collaboration with local communities beyond theory and good intentions to a sustainable practice. This is a game-changing book that every archaeologist must read.” – Randall H. McGuire, author of Archaeology as Political Action

BEING AND BECOMING INDIGENOUS ARCHAEOLOGISTS

BEING AND BECOMING INDIGENOUS ARCHAEOLOGISTS

Author: George Nicholas

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1598744984

Category: Social Science

Page: 350

View: 535

What does being an archaeologist mean to Indigenous persons? How and why do some become archaeologists? What has led them down a path to what some in their communities have labeled a colonialist venture? What were are the challenges they have faced, and the motivations that have allowed them to succeed? How have they managed to balance traditional values and worldview with Western modes of inquiry? And how are their contributions broadening the scope of archaeology? Indigenous archaeologists have the often awkward role of trying to serves as spokespeople both for their home community and for the scientific community of archaeologists. This volume tells the stories—in their own words-- of 37 indigenous archaeologists from six continents, how they became archaeologists, and how their dual role affects their relationships with their community and their professional colleagues. Sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress

Archaeologies of the Heart

Archaeologies of the Heart

Author: Kisha Supernant

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030363505

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 757

Archaeological practice is currently shifting in response to feminist, indigenous, activist, community-based, and anarchic critiques of how archaeology is practiced and how science is used to interpret the past lives of people. Inspired by the calls for a different way of doing archaeology, this volume presents a case here for a heart-centered archaeological practice. Heart-centered practice emerged in care-based disciplines, such as nursing and various forms of therapy, as a way to recognize the importance of caring for those on whom we work, and as an avenue to explore how our interactions with others impacts our own emotions and heart. Archaeologists are disciplined to separate mind and heart, a division which harkens back to the origins of western thought. The dualism between the mental and the physical is fundamental to the concept that humans can objectively study the world without being immersed in it. Scientific approaches to understanding the world assume there is an objective world to be studied and that humans must remove themselves from that world in order to find the truth. An archaeology of the heart rejects this dualism; rather, we see mind, body, heart, and spirit as inextricable. An archaeology of the heart provides a new space for thinking through an integrated, responsible, and grounded archaeology, where there is care for the living and the dead, acknowledges the need to build responsible relationships with communities, and with the archaeological record, and emphasize the role of rigor in how work and research is conducted. The contributions bring together archaeological practitioners from across the globe in different contexts to explore how heart-centered practice can impact archaeological theory, methodology, and research throughout the discipline.

Archaeology and Community Service Learning

Archaeology and Community Service Learning

Author: Michael S. Nassaney

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015080862041

Category: Social Science

Page: 239

View: 444

"Highlights the important role of archaeology and community service learning in transforming higher education into a progressive force that challenges contemporary social inequality through empowering students to work collaboratively in uncovering the silenced histories of oppressed and exploited groups."--Howard Rosing, DePaul University "Nassaney and Levine examine how CSL can contribute to what they see as the 'necessary reform' of archaeological pedagogy in the United States."--Maureen Malloy, Society for American Archaeology In recent years, a number of archaeologists have begun making concerted attempts to reach out and engage the public in their work. This collection examines how the field can successfully incorporate community service learning (CSL) into its pedagogies to broaden and enhance learning opportunities for students, promote civic engagement, and embrace community partnerships. Editors Michael Nassaney and Mary Ann Levine have been actively integrating the techniques of CSL into their research for years, and view it as a natural outgrowth of developments in the field since the 1970s. Although archaeology has long emphasized a practical, field-based approach in training new scholars, CSL moves beyond "volunteering" and experiential learning. In discussing specific examples from work in historical archaeology, the contributors highlight the achievements and challenges faced by archaeologists and their students, in the classroom and the field, while collaborating with a variety of community partners.

Collaborating at the Trowel's Edge

Collaborating at the Trowel's Edge

Author: Stephen W. Silliman

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816527229

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 999

A fundamental issue for twenty-first century archaeologists is the need to better direct their efforts toward supporting rather than harming indigenous peoples. Collaborative indigenous archaeology has already begun to stress the importance of cooperative, community-based research; this book now offers an up-to-date assessment of how Native American and non-native archaeologists have jointly undertaken research that is not only politically aware and historically minded but fundamentally better as well. Eighteen contributors—many with tribal ties—cover the current state of collaborative indigenous archaeology in North America to show where the discipline is headed. Continent-wide cases, from the Northeast to the Southwest, demonstrate the situated nature of local practice alongside the global significance of further decolonizing archaeology. And by probing issues of indigenous participation with an eye toward method, theory, and pedagogy, many show how the archaeological field school can be retailored to address politics, ethics, and critical practice alongside traditional teaching and research methods. These chapters reflect the strong link between politics and research, showing what can be achieved when indigenous values, perspectives, and knowledge are placed at the center of the research process. They not only draw on experiences at specific field schools but also examine advances in indigenous cultural resource management and in training Native American and non-native students. Theoretically informed and practically grounded, Collaborating at the Trowel’s Edge is a virtual guide for rethinking field schools and is an essential volume for anyone involved in North American archaeology—professionals, students, tribal scholars, or avocationalists—as well as those working with indigenous peoples in other parts of the world. It both reflects the rapidly changing landscape of archaeology and charts new directions to ensure the ongoing vitality of the discipline.

An Archaeology of Doings

An Archaeology of Doings

Author: Severin M. Fowles

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 1934691569

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 477

In this probing study, Severin Fowles undertakes a sustained critique of religion as an analytical category in archaeological research. Building from a careful dissection of the relationship between secularism, premodernity, and archaeology, Fowles explores what is at stake in our reconstructions of an enchanted past. In doing so, he offers a detailed examination of the case of Ancestral Pueblo society in the American Southwest, widely regarded as a native tradition that was consumed with religious ritual.

Making Heritage Together

Making Heritage Together

Author: Aris Anagnostopoulos

Publisher:

ISBN: 1032194766

Category: Archaeology and state

Page: 0

View: 455

"Making Heritage Together presents a case study of public archaeology by focusing on the collaborative creation of knowledge about the past with a rural community in central Crete. It is based on a long-term archaeological ethnography project that engaged this village community in collectively researching, preserving and managing their cultural heritage. This volume presents the theoretical and local contexts for the project, explains the methodology and the project outcomes, and reviews in detail some of the public archaeology actions with the community as examples of collaborative, research-based heritage management. What the authors emphasize in this book is the value of local context in designing and implementing public archaeology projects, and the necessity of establishing methods to understand, collaborate and interact with culturally specific groups and publics. They argue for the implementation of archaeological ethnographic research as a method of creating instances and spaces for collaborative knowledge production. The volume contributes to a greater understanding of how rural communities can be successfully engaged in the management of their own heritage. It will be relevant to archaeologists and other heritage professionals who aim to maximise the inclusivity and impact of small projects with minimal resources and achieve sustainable processes of collaboration with local stakeholders"--

Community-Based Heritage in Africa

Community-Based Heritage in Africa

Author: Peter R. Schmidt

Publisher:

ISBN: 1611329523

Category: Community archaeology

Page: 288

View: 909

This volume provides a powerful alternative to the Western paradigms that have governed archaeological inquiry and heritage studies in Africa. Community-based Heritage Researchin Africaboldly shifts focus away from top-down community engagements, usually instigated by elite academic and heritage institutions, to examine locally initiated projects. Schmidt explores how and why local research initiatives, which are often motivated by rapid culture change caused by globalization, arose among the Haya people of western Tanzania. In particular, the trauma of HIV/AIDS resulted in the loss of elders who had performed oral traditions and rituals at sacred places, the two most recognized forms of heritage among the Haya as well as distinct alternatives to the authorized heritage discourse favored around the globe. Examining three local initiatives, Schmidt draws on his experience as an anthropologist invited to collaborate and co-produce with the Haya to provide a poignant rendering of the successes, conflicts, and failures that punctuated their participatory community research efforts. This frank appraisal privileges local voices and focuses attention on the unique and important contributions that such projects can make to the preservation of regional history. Through this blend of personalized narrative and analytical examination, the book provides fresh insights into African archaeology and heritage studies.