Early Modern Autobiography

Early Modern Autobiography

Author: Ronald Bedford

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472069284

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 843

Early Modern Autobiography considers the many ways in which autobiographical selves emerged from the late medieval period through the seventeenth century, with the aim of understanding the interaction between those individuals' lives and their worlds, the ways in which they could be recorded, and the contexts in which they are read. In addressing this historical arc, the volume develops new readings of significant autobiographical works, while also suggesting the importance of texts and contexts that have rarely been analyzed in detail, enabling the contributors to reflect on, and challenge, some prevailing ideas about what it means to write autobiographically and about the development of notions of self-representation.

Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature

Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature

Author: Sharon Seelig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521856957

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 542

Early modern autobiographies and diaries provide a unique insight into women's lives and how they remembered, interpreted and represented their experiences. Sharon Seelig analyzes the writings of six seventeenth-century women: diaries by Margaret Hoby and Anne Clifford, more extended narratives by Lucy Hutchinson, Ann Fanshawe, and Anne Halkett, and the extraordinarily varied and self-dramatizing publications of Margaret Cavendish. Combining an original account of the development of autobiography with analysis of the texts, Seelig explores the relation between the writers' choices of genre and form and the stories they chose to tell.

Autobiography in Early Modern Spain

Autobiography in Early Modern Spain

Author: Nicholas Spadaccini

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816620098

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 728

Autobiography in Early Modern Spain was first published in 1991. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Autobiography in Early Modern Spain Nicholas Spadaccini and Jenaro Talens, Editors Introduction. The Construction of the Self: Notes on Autobiography in Early Modern Spain Nicholas Spadaccini and Jenaro Talens Chapter 1. Narration and Argumentation in Autobiographical Discourse Antonio Gomez-Moriana Chapter 2. A Clown at Court: Francesillo de Zuniga's Cronica burlesca George Mariscal Chapter 3. A Methodological Prolegomenon to a Post-Modernist Reading of Santa Teresa's Autobiography Patrick Dust Chapter 4. Golden Age Autobiography: The Soldiers Margarita Levisi Chapter 5. The Picaresque as Autobiography: Story and History Edward Friedman Chapter 6. The Historical Function of Picaresque Autobiographies: Toward a History of Social Offenders Anthony N. Zahareas Chapter 7. Fortune's Monster and the Monarchy in Las relaciones de Antonio Perez Helen H. Reed Chapter 8. The Woman at the Border: Some Thoughts on Cervantes and Autobiography Ruth El Saffar Chapter 9. Poetry as Autobiography: Theory and Poetic Practice in Cervantes Jenaro Talens Appendix Curriculum vitae Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Memory, History, and Autobiography in Early Modern Towns in East and West

Memory, History, and Autobiography in Early Modern Towns in East and West

Author: Vanessa Harding

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443881975

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 701

Between the sixteenth and the nineteenth centuries, in both Western Europe and East Asia, towns and cities helped to shape the individual consciousness, against the background of a more traditional society in which collective values remained strong. Towns were centres of stimulus, challenge, and opportunity for residents and visitors, and the identity of the town itself, its character and history, became a strong theme in the formation of the individual. Writing and the circulation of texts played an important part in this process. Towns created artefacts, rituals, and memories that embodied their history and identity, but individuals positioned themselves and their families in the town histories as they wrote them. The seven essays in this volume range in focus from Renaissance Venice to nineteenth-century Edo (Tokyo), and from capital cities (Seoul, London) to provincial towns in France, England, and Japan. They explore the interaction of self, family, and social group and the construction of collective memory, examining autobiographies, letters and “exchange diaries”, family narratives, and urban histories and collections. Together, they challenge the long-prevailing historiography that contrasts the emergence of the individual in European societies with the persistently traditionalist and collective character of East Asian societies in the Early Modern period.

Autobiographical Writing by Early Modern Hispanic Women

Autobiographical Writing by Early Modern Hispanic Women

Author: Professor Elizabeth Teresa Howe

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781472435798

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 360

View: 991

Women’s life writing in general has too often been ignored, dismissed, or relegated to a separate category in those few studies of the genre that include it. The present work addresses these issues and offers a countervailing argument that focuses on the contributions of women writers to the study of autobiography in Spanish during the early modern period, both in Spain and in Mexico.

Early Modern English Lives

Early Modern English Lives

Author: Ronald Bedford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138275883

Category:

Page:

View: 620

How did early modern English people write about themselves, and how do we listen to their voices four centuries later? The authors of Early Modern English Lives: Autobiography and Self-Representation 1500-1660 argue that identity is depicted through complex, subtle, and often contradictory social interactions and literary forms. Diaries, letters, daily spiritual reckonings, household journals, travel journals, accounts of warfare, incidental meditations on the nature of time, death and self-reflection, as well as life stories themselves: these are just some of the texts that allow us to address the social and historical conditions that influenced early modern self-writing. The texts explored in Early Modern English Lives do not automatically speak to our familiar patterns of introspection and self-inquiry. Often formal, highly metaphorical and emotionally restrained, they are very different in both tone and purpose from the autobiographies that crowd bookshelves today. Does the lack of emotional description suggest that complex emotions themselves, in all the depth and variety that we now understand (and expect of) them, are a relatively modern phenomenon? This is one of the questions addressed by Early Modern English Lives. The authors bring to our attention the kinds of rhetorical and generic features of early modern self-representation that can help us to appreciate people living four hundred years ago as the complicated, composite figures they were: people whose expression of identity involved an elaborate interplay of roles and discourses, and for whom the notion of privacy itself was a wholly different phenomenon.

Handbook of Autobiography / Autofiction

Handbook of Autobiography / Autofiction

Author: Martina Wagner-Egelhaaf

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110279818

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 2220

View: 285

Autobiographical writings have been a major cultural genre from antiquity to the present time. General questions of the literary as, e.g., the relation between literature and reality, truth and fiction, the dependency of author, narrator, and figure, or issues of individual and cultural styles etc., can be studied preeminently in the autobiographical genre. Yet, the tradition of life-writing has, in the course of literary history, developed manifold types and forms. Especially in the globalized age, where the media and other technological / cultural factors contribute to a rapid transformation of lifestyles, autobiographical writing has maintained, even enhanced, its popularity and importance. By conceiving autobiography in a wide sense that includes memoirs, diaries, self-portraits and autofiction as well as media transformations of the genre, this three-volume handbook offers a comprehensive survey of theoretical approaches, systematic aspects, and historical developments in an international and interdisciplinary perspective. While autobiography is usually considered to be a European tradition, special emphasis is placed on the modes of self-representation in non-Western cultures and on inter- and transcultural perspectives of the genre. The individual contributions are closely interconnected by a system of cross-references. The handbook addresses scholars of cultural and literary studies, students as well as non-academic readers.

A History of Irish Autobiography

A History of Irish Autobiography

Author: Liam Harte

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108548458

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 436

View: 166

A History of Irish Autobiography is the first ever critical survey of autobiographical self-representation in Ireland from its recoverable beginnings to the twenty-first century. The book draws on a wealth of original scholarship by leading experts to provide an authoritative examination of autobiographical writing in the English and Irish languages. Beginning with a comprehensive overview of autobiography theory and criticism in Ireland, the History guides the reader through seventeen centuries of Irish achievement in autobiography, a category that incorporates diverse literary forms, from religious tracts and travelogues to letters, diaries, and online journals. This ambitious book is rich in insight. Chapters are structured around key subgenres, themes, texts, and practitioners, each featuring a guide to recommended further reading. The volume's extensive coverage is complemented by a detailed chronology of Irish autobiography from the fifth century to the contemporary era, the first of its kind to be published.

The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi

The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi

Author: Leone Modena

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691213934

Category: History

Page:

View: 186

Leon (Judah Aryeh) Modena was a major intellectual figure of the early modern Italian Jewish community--a complex and intriguing personality who was famous among contemporary European Christians as well as Jews. Modena (1571-1648) produced an autobiography that documents in poignant detail the turbulent life of his family in the Jewish ghetto of Venice. The text of this work is well known to Jewish scholars but has never before been translated from the original Hebrew, except in brief excerpts. This complete translation, based on Modena's autograph manuscript, makes available in English a wealth of historical material about Jewish family life of the period, religion in daily life, the plague of 1630-1631, crime and punishment, the influence of kabbalistic mysticism, and a host of other subjects. The translator, Mark R. Cohen, and four other distinguished scholars add commentary that places the work in historical and literary context. Modena describes his fascination with the astrology and alchemy that were important parts of the Jewish and general culture of the seventeenth century. He also portrays his struggle against poverty and against compulsive gambling, which, cleverly punning on a biblical verse, he called the "sin of Judah." In addition, the book contains accounts of Modena's sorrow over his three sons: the death of the eldest from the poisonous fumes of his own alchemical laboratory, the brutal murder of the youngest, and the exile of the remaining son. The introductory essay by Mark R. Cohen and Theodore K. Rabb highlights the significance of the work for early modern Jewish and general European history. Howard E. Adelman presents an up-to-date biographical sketch of the author and points the way toward a new assessment of his place in Jewish history. Natalie Z. Davis places Modena's work in the context of European autobiography, both Christian and Jewish, and especially explores the implications of the Jewish status as outsider for the privileged exploration of the self. A set of historical notes, compiled by Howard Adelman and Benjamin C. I. Ravid, elucidates the text.