Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts

Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts

Author: Emily J. Orlando

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817315375

Category: Art

Page: 250

View: 997

An insightful look at representations of women’s bodies and female authority. This work explores Edith Wharton's career-long concern with a 19th-century visual culture that limited female artistic agency and expression. Wharton repeatedly invoked the visual arts--especially painting—as a medium for revealing the ways that women's bodies have been represented (as passive, sexualized, infantalized, sickly, dead). Well-versed in the Italian masters, Wharton made special use of the art of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, particularly its penchant for producing not portraits of individual women but instead icons onto whose bodies male desire is superimposed. Emily Orlando contends that while Wharton's early work presents women enshrined by men through art, the middle and later fiction shifts the seat of power to women. From Lily Bart in The House of Mirth to Undine Spragg in The Custom of the Country and Ellen Olenska in The Age of Innocence, women evolve from victims to vital agents, securing for themselves a more empowering and satisfying relationship to art and to their own identities. Orlando also studies the lesser-known short stories and novels, revealing Wharton’s re-workings of texts by Browning, Poe, Balzac, George Eliot, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and, most significantly, Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts is the first extended study to examine the presence in Wharton's fiction of the Pre-Raphaelite poetry and painting of Rossetti and his muses, notably Elizabeth Siddall and Jane Morris. Wharton emerges as one of American literature's most gifted inter-textual realists, providing a vivid lens through which to view issues of power, resistance, and social change as they surface in American literature and culture.

Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Author: Janet Beer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349260157

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 223

View: 515

A wide range of short fiction by Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman is the focus for this study, examining both genre and theme. Chopin's short stories, Wharton's novellas, Chopin's frankly erotic writing and the homilies in which Gilman warns of the dangers of the sexually transmitted disease are compared. There are also essays on ethnicity in the work of Chopin, Wharton's New England stories, Gilman's innovative use of genre and 'The Yellow Wallpaper' on film. All three writers are still popular in US classrooms in particular. This paperback edition includes a new Preface to the material, providing a useful update on recent scholarship.

Edith Wharton's Lenox

Edith Wharton's Lenox

Author: Cornelia Brooke Gilder

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467135177

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 923

In 1900, Edith Wharton burst into the settled summer colony of Lenox. An aspiring novelist in her thirties, she was already a ferocious aesthete and intellect. She and her husband, Teddy, planned a defiantly classical villa, and she became a bestselling author with The House of Mirth in 1905. As a hostess, designer, gardener and writer, Wharton set high standards that delighted many, including Ambassador Joseph Choate and sculptor Daniel Chester French. But her perceptive and sometimes indiscreet pen also alienated potent figures like Emily Vanderbilt Sloane and Georgiana Welles Sargent. Author Cornelia Brooke Gilder gives an insider's glimpse of the community's reaction to this disruptive star during her tumultuous Lenox decade.

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's "Ethan Frome"

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781410345387

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 25

View: 990

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's "Ethan Frome," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

Selected Poems of Edith Wharton

Selected Poems of Edith Wharton

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781501182846

Category: Poetry

Page: 352

View: 483

Edith Wharton, the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with her novel The Age of Innocence, was also a brilliant poet. This revealing collection of 134 poems brings together a fascinating array of her verse—including fifty poems that have never before been published. The celebrated American novelist and short story writer Edith Wharton, author of The House of Mirth, Ethan Frome, and the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Age of Innocence, was also a dedicated, passionate poet. A lover of words, she read, studied, and composed poetry all of her life, publishing her first collection of poems at the age of sixteen. In her memoir, A Backward Glance, Wharton declared herself dazzled by poetry; she called it her “chiefest passion and greatest joy.” The 134 selected poems in this volume include fifty published for the first time. Wharton’s poetry is arranged thematically, offering context as the poems explore new facets of her literary ability and character. These works illuminate a richer, sometimes darker side of Wharton. Her subjects range from the public and political—her first published poem was about a boy who hanged himself in jail—to intimate lyric poems expressing heartbreak, loss, and mortality. She wrote frequently about works of art and historical figures and places, and some of her most striking work explores the origins of creativity itself. These selected poems showcase Wharton’s vivid imagination and her personal experience. Relatively overlooked until now, her poetry and its importance in her life provide an enlightening lens through which to view one of the finest writers of the twentieth century.

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781410319999

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 15

View: 596

A Study Guide for Edith Wharton's "The Age of Innocence," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and the Place of Culture

Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and the Place of Culture

Author: Julie Olin-Ammentorp

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496216885

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 396

View: 977

Edith Wharton and Willa Cather wrote many of the most enduring American novels from the first half of the twentieth century, including Wharton's The House of Mirth, Ethan Frome, and The Age of Innocence, and Cather's O Pioneers!, My Ántonia, and Death Comes for the Archbishop. Yet despite their perennial popularity and their status as major American novelists, Wharton (1862-1937) and Cather (1873-1947) have rarely been studied together. Indeed, critics and scholars seem to have conspired to keep them at a distance: Wharton is seen as "our literary aristocrat," an author who chronicles the lives of the East Coast, Europe-bound elite, while Cather is considered a prairie populist who describes the lives of rugged western pioneers. These depictions, though partially valid, nonetheless rely on oversimplifications and neglect the striking and important ways the works of these two authors intersect. The first comparative study of Edith Wharton and Willa Cather in thirty years, this book combines biographical, historical, and literary analyses with a focus on place and aesthetics to reveal Wharton's and Cather's parallel experiences of dislocation, their relationship to each other as writers, and the profound similarities in their theories of fiction. Julie Olin-Ammentorp provides a new assessment of the affinities between Wharton and Cather by exploring the importance of literary and geographic place in their lives and works, including the role of New York City, the American West, France, and travel. In doing so she reveals the two authors' shared concern about the culture of place and the place of culture in the United States.

CliffsNotes on Wharton's The House of Mirth

CliffsNotes on Wharton's The House of Mirth

Author: Bruce E Walker

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780544182073

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 80

View: 164

The original CliffsNotes study guides offer expert commentary on major themes, plots, characters, literary devices, and historical background. The latest generation of titles in this series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format. CliffsNotes on The House of Mirth takes you into the waning years of the Gilded Age and the moral bankruptcy of New York City's elite class. Edith Wharton's story of a woman—whose beauty causes men to desire to possess her and women to be jealous of her—reflects the complicated struggle of the individual against the social strictures of a powerful, and triumphant, moneyed class. This concise supplement to the satirically critical The House of Mirth, helps you understand the overall structure of the novel, actions and motivations of the characters, and the social and cultural perspectives of the author. Features that help you study include Chapter-by-chapter summaries and commentaries A character map that outline key characteristics and relationships Insightful character analyses A critical essay about the opulence and emptiness of the Gilded Age A review section that tests your knowledge Classic literature or modern-day treasure—you'll understand it all with expert information and insight from CliffsNotes study guides.

Edith Wharton and the Art of Fiction

Edith Wharton and the Art of Fiction

Author: Penelope Vita-Finzi

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN: UCAL:B5302713

Category: Authors, American

Page: 188

View: 434

Edith Wharton was a travel and architectural writer as well as a novelist. Her belief in the classical principles of order and harmony is revealed in her non-fiction works and this led her to a conviction of the need for a coherent theory of fiction. However, her attempt to formulate such a theory was undermined by her romantic idea of inspiration and imagination, and this tension between classical and romantic principles is clearly revealed by comparisons between her works of non-fiction and fiction.