The Great War and the Language of Modernism

The Great War and the Language of Modernism

Author: Vincent Sherry

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195178180

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 395

View: 969

Vincent Sherry reopens long unanswered questions regarding the influence of the 1914 war on the verbal experiments of modernist poetry and fiction. He recovers the political discourses of the British campaign, offering new readings of Woolf, Eliot and Pound.

Great War Modernism

Great War Modernism

Author: Nanette Norris

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781611478044

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 828

New Modernist Studies, while reviving and revitalizing modernist studies through lively, scholarly debate about historicity, aesthetics, politics, and genres, is struggling with important questions concerning the delineation that makes discussion fruitful and possible. This volume aims to explore and clarify the position of the so-called ‘core’ of literary modernism in its seminal engagement with the Great War. In studying the years of the Great War, we find ourselves once more studying ‘the giants,’ about whom there is so much more to say, as well as adding hitherto marginalized writers – and a few visual artists – to the canon. The contention here is that these war years were seminal to the development of a distinguishable literary practice which is called ‘modernism,’ but perhaps could be further delineated as ‘Great War modernism,’ a practice whose aesthetic merits can be addressed through formal analysis. This collection of essays offers new insight into canonical British/American/European modernism of the Great War period using the critical tools of contemporary, expansionist modernist studies. By focusing on war, and on the experience of the soldier and of those dealing with issues of war and survival, these studies link the unique forms of expression found in modernism with the fragmented, violent, and traumatic experience of the time.

The Great War and the Language of Modernism

The Great War and the Language of Modernism

Author: Vincent Sherry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019802620X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 416

View: 495

With the expressions "Lost Generation" and "The Men of 1914," the major authors of modernism designated the overwhelming effect the First World War exerted on their era. Literary critics have long employed the same phrases in an attempt to place a radically experimental, specifically modernist writing in its formative, historical setting. What real basis did that Great War provide for the verbal inventiveness of modernist poetry and fiction? Does the literature we bring under this heading respond directly to that provocation, and, if so, what historical memories or revelations can be heard to stir in these words? Vincent Sherry reopens these long unanswered questions by focusing attention on the public culture of the English war. He reads the discourses through which the Liberal party constructed its cause, its Great Campaign. A breakdown in the established language of liberal modernity--the idioms of public reason and civic rationality--marked the sizable crisis this event represents in the mainstream traditions of post-Reformation Europe. If modernist writing characteristically attempts to challenge the standard values of Enlightenment rationalism, this study recovers the historical cultural setting of its most substantial and daring opportunity. And this moment was the occasion for great artistic innovations in the work of Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound. Combining the records of political journalism and popular intellectual culture with abundant visual illustration, Vincent Sherry provides the framework for new interpretations of the major texts of Woolf, Eliot, and Pound. With its relocation of the verbal imagination of modernism in the context of the English war, The Great War and the Language of Modernism restores the historical content and depth of this literature, revealing its most daunting import.

Modernism, History and the First World War

Modernism, History and the First World War

Author: Trudi Tate

Publisher: Humanities-Ebooks

ISBN: 9781847602404

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 640

Drawing upon medical journals, newspapers, propaganda, military histories, and other writings of the day, Modernism, History and the First World War reads such writers as Woolf, HD, Ford, Faulkner, Kipling, and Lawrence alongside fiction and memoirs of soldiers and nurses who served in the war. This ground breaking blend of cultural history and close readings shows how modernism after 1914 emerges as a strange but important form of war writing, and was profoundly engaged with its own troubled history.

The Great War, The Waste Land and the Modernist Long Poem

The Great War, The Waste Land and the Modernist Long Poem

Author: Oliver Tearle

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350027039

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 312

The Great War, The Waste Land and the Modernist Long Poem explores how cultural responses to the trauma of the First World War found expression in the form of the modernist long poem. Beginning with T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Oliver Tearle reads that most famous example of the genre in comparison with lesser known long poems, such as Hope Mirrlees's Paris: A Poem, Richard Aldington's A Fool I' the Forest and Nancy Cunard's Parallax. As well as presenting a new history of this neglected genre, the book examines the ways in which the modernist long poem represented the seminal literary form for grappling with the crises of European modernity in the wake of World War I.

War Trauma and English Modernism

War Trauma and English Modernism

Author: C. Krockel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230307759

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 241

View: 406

This is the first book to consistently read English Modernist literature as testimony to trauma of the First and Second World Wars. Focusing upon T.S. Eliot and D.H. Lawrence, it examines the impact of war upon their lives and their strategies to resist it through literary innovation.

Modernism, War, and Violence

Modernism, War, and Violence

Author: Marina MacKay

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472590084

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 846

The modernist period was an era of world war and violent revolution. Covering a wide range of authors from Joseph Conrad and Thomas Hardy at the beginning of the period to Elizabeth Bowen and Samuel Beckett at the end, this book situates modernism's extraordinary literary achievements in their contexts of historical violence, while surveying the ways in which the relationships between modernism and conflict have been understood by readers and critics over the past fifty years. Ranging from the colonial conflicts of the late 19th century to the world wars and the civil wars in between, and concluding with the institutionalization of modernism in the Cold War, Modernism, War, and Violence provides a starting point for readers who are new to these topics and offers a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the field for a more advanced audience.

Fragmenting modernism

Fragmenting modernism

Author: Sara Haslam

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781847795403

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 960

This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. Fragmenting modernism' is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the 'English Review', and author of 'The Good Soldier', he shaped the development of literary modernism. But as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown, and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively, and plot summaries of his major books ('The Good Soldier' and 'Parade's End') are provided, as is a brief biography. 'Fragmenting Modernism' will be useful for anyone studying the literature of the early twentieth century, impressionism or modernism in general terms, as well as for those who seek to investigate in detail one of the great polymorphous figures of the time.

The International Migration of German Great War Veterans

The International Migration of German Great War Veterans

Author: Erika Kuhlman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137501608

Category: History

Page: 116

View: 936

This book uses story-telling to recreate the history of German veteran migration after the First World War. German veterans of the Great War were among Europe’s most volatile population when they returned to a defeated nation in 1918, after great expectations of victory and personal heroism. Some ex-servicemen chose to flee the nation for which they had fought, and begin their lives afresh in the nation against which they had fought: the United States.

Modernism and Mourning

Modernism and Mourning

Author: Patricia Rae

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 0838756174

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 310

View: 884

The essays in Modernism and Mourning examine the work of mourning in modernist literature, or more precisely, its propensity for resisting this work. Drawing from recent developments in the theory and cultural history of mourning, its contributors explore the various ways in which modernist writers repudiate Freud's famous injunction to mourners to work through their grief, endorsing instead a resistant, or melancholic mourning that shapes both their themes and their radical experiments with form. The emerging picture of the pervasive influence of melancholic mourning in modernist literature casts new light on longstanding critical arguments, especially those about the politics of modernism. It also makes clear the pertinence of this literature to the present day, in which the catastrophic losses of 9/11, of retaliatory war, of racially motivated genocide, of the AIDS epidemic, have made the work of mourning a subject of widespread interest and debate. Patricia Rae is Head of the Department of English at Queen's University.