The East Coast Main Line 1939-1959 (Volume 2)

The East Coast Main Line 1939-1959 (Volume 2)

Author: Peter Tuffrey

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 256

View: 118

• The first detailed study of this huge mainline through its operational history • Features extended commentaries from the authors, rich in detail • Superbly illustrated with black and white photographs, many never seen before In this second and final volume, the whole of the East Coast Main Line between King’s Cross and Edinburgh Waverley stations is examined closely, with a particular emphasis on the ways and structures: the line, stations, connections, yards, and other physical features. Interposed are accounts of the traffic at the principal stations – including connecting and branch line services – with observations on changes over the period 1939 to 1959. Some emphasis is placed on freight traffic on account of its importance and, perhaps, its relative unfamiliarity to the reader. The lines, stations and many other elements are described as they were in August 1939, but as some plans on which they are based are dated before the late 1930s, there may be marginal differences from the precise layout in 1939.

History of the East Coast Main Line

History of the East Coast Main Line

Author: Robin Jones

Publisher: The Crowood Press

ISBN: 9781785002878

Category: Transportation

Page: 300

View: 331

Since the mid-nineteenth century the East Coast Main Line has been one of the major routes from London to northern England and to Scotland. It has seen some of the greatest achievements in the railways, most notably the 'Flying Scotsman' becoming, in 1934, the first locomotive in the world to exceed 100mph and the 'Mallard' in 1938 claiming the as-yet-unbroken world speed record for steam locomotives of 126mph. The East Coast Main Line not only made history by facilitating an ever-faster link between two capital cities, it also provided an international stage for Britain's engineering marvels, inspiring many generations of schoolboys and adults alike. That was to continue after the end of the steam era on British Railways, with diesel and then electric traction setting a series of new records over the route. This new book looks at how the London-Edinburgh line became the world's fastest steam railway and how its proud and unique heritage is appreciated and celebrated today more than ever before. Superbly illustrated with over 300 colour and black & white photographs.

King's Cross Second Man

King's Cross Second Man

Author: Norman Hill

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473878259

Category: Transportation

Page: 168

View: 347

Late in 1964 the author made a career change from the Midland Region railway clerical grades, to the Eastern Region Motive Power Department at King's Cross, initially as a locomotive cleaner. This was the realization of an ambition held for some ten years and by the end of December 1964, he became eligible for second man duties. On 28 December 1964, he was second man on a return trip to Peterborough, and determined to keep a record of the run; locomotive employed, the driver he accompanied, the rostered diagram and the actual circumstances of the diagram. Norman duly recorded this shift, along with all shifts worked during his employment as second man.Norman realized that such a record would be of great interest to both railway enthusiasts and employees, past and present. Especially those who worked on the southern section of the East Coast Main Line or those with a special interest in the railways of the 1960s a formative period of railway modernization when 150 years of steam-powered railway locomotion gave way to more modern means of motive power. This book will use Norman's records of 1964-68 as a basis for an account in which he will show the slow and difficult transition of Britains railway from its traditional steam-powered world into the modern world of diesel and electric traction.Norman's work as second man took him to places and railway installations in North London that no longer exist, and which have taken their place in railway history, and sometimes even within the broader fabric of the history of London, and of England itself. Through the medium of Norman's records of 1960's railway working, he looks back and rediscovers these forgotten places and so contrasts nineteenth-century railways and industrial history with operating practices on todays modern British railways.

Britain from the Rails

Britain from the Rails

Author: Benedict Le Vay

Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides

ISBN: 184162277X

Category: Travel

Page: 368

View: 484

There's a magical romance about trains that no other form of transport can capture. Meeting under an iconic station clock at a grand terminus. Gathering speed through city, town and country, swooping across viaducts, rattling across huge junctions and whistling through tunnels. At long last you are in a small Sussex beachside halt, or a Welsh valley country station, beside a quiet Norfolk waterway, or winding through a remote forest high above a Scottish loch. Dreamily you think, 'Do those same twin ribbons of steel really lead all the way back to the greatest city in Europe? Can this really be the very same seat?'Britain from the Rails travels to a world far from the endless queues and prodding security of ugly airport terminals. It abandons the cars to their motorway jams and soaring petrol prices, and revels instead in the gems of Britain's historic railway system.

Railway Renaissance

Railway Renaissance

Author: Gareth David

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473862029

Category: Transportation

Page: 336

View: 462

When a 35 mile stretch of the former Waverley route from Edinburgh to Carlisle reopened on 6 September 2015, it became the most significant reopening of any UK railway since the infamous Beeching Report ,'The reshaping of British Railways', was published in March 1963.In his report, Dr Riochard Beeching recommended sweeping closures of lines across the UK to improve the financial performance of British railways, which led to wholesale closures over the following decade and a reduction in the UK rail network from 18,000 miles in 1963, to some 11,000 miles a decade later.But since that low point was reached in the early 1970s a revolution has been taking place. Passenger traffic on the railways is now at its highest level since the 1940s and from Alloa to Aberdare, as well as from Mansfield to Maesteg, closed lines have reopened and the tide of Beeching closures has been gradually rolled back. Scores of stations have been reopened and on many of the newly revived lines, passenger traffic is far exceeding the forecasts used to support their reopening.In this comprehensive survey of new and reopened railways and stations across England, Scotland and Wales, Gareth David asks what it tells us about Dr Beeching's report, looking at how lines that were earmarked for closure in that report, but escaped the axe, have fared and reviews the host of further routes, which are either set to be reopened or are the focus of reopening campaigns.

The Great Central Railway

The Great Central Railway

Author: John Palmer

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526777928

Category: Transportation

Page: 346

View: 101

For generations of railway enthusiasts and more lately for social historians, the life and times of the former Great Central Railway and in particular its extension towards London in the 1890s and closure seventy years later, have generated considerable interest and controversy. Although many books have been written about the Railway, the majority in recent times have concentrated upon providing a photographic record and a nostalgic look in retrospect to what was generally perceived as happier times for the route. None of the books have presented the outcome from thorough research into the business aspects of the Railway and its successive private (LNER) and public (BR) ownerships through war and peace, and times of industrial, social and political change, that influenced and shaped the demand for a railway service. While retaining a strong railway theme throughout, the book identifies the role played by successive governments, the electricity and coal industries and the effect of social change that, together resulted in a case for closure. The content of the book replaces much supposition with fact and places on record what really happened. The final part of the book acknowledges the fine work over half a century of volunteers dedicated to saving a section of the line in Leicestershire.

British Railways in Transition

British Railways in Transition

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781526703187

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 328

This is a book about the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction on British Railways, covering a period from 1960–1970. The author Jim Blake, took a huge number of pictures during this period, covering all aspects of the railway and its operations, both in the London area, where he lived and also around the country. This book looks at the railway scene in decline, trying to come to terms with the post Beeching, post steam era, before a change of political will, that has seen much rail investment in recent times. The volume, not only looks at locomotives and trains, but also the overall railway scene of that decade of great change the 1960s.

Alfred Hitchcock’s London: A Reference Guide to Locations

Alfred Hitchcock’s London: A Reference Guide to Locations

Author: Gary Giblin

Publisher: Midnight Marquee & BearManor Media

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 135

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Tonight you are going to visit one of the world's most famous cities. Here you will see historic palaces, elegant hotels, and magnificent restaurants. If you're lucky, you may even see a corpse floating down the Thames. For tonight we shall visit:ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S LONDON Now you can follow in the footsteps of the most famous film director of all time, from the corridors of Scotland Yard and the stalls of the Royal Albert Hall to the top of Tower Bridge and the dome of St Paul's Cathedral. There was a hardly a corner of London that Hitchcock didn't visit and they're all here--over 200 of them--from the site of his birth in 1899 to the cathedral where he was memorialized in 1980.

London's Railways, 1967–1977

London's Railways, 1967–1977

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Wharncliffe

ISBN: 9781473849280

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 717

This pictorial book covers London's railways from 1967 to 1977, showing the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction.This volume has a very readable narrative, telling tales of the authors adventures during his many trips around the London railway network.The volume encapsulates a period of time in Britain, during which a great deal of change was taking place, not only with railways and transport, but also socially and economically.Jim Blake, describes all of these changes, while also looking at the capitals transport scene of the period.