Histories of Southeastern Archaeology

Histories of Southeastern Archaeology

Author: Shannon Tushingham

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817311391

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 452

These twenty papers are taken from the 56th International Southeastern Archaeological Conference held in 1999 in honour of Charles H McNutt. They comprise memoirs and personal histories of the progress of southeastern archaeology with insider's views on fieldwork techniques, research strategies, location, funding, legislation, and theoretical aspects of their work.

A Brief History of Archaeology

A Brief History of Archaeology

Author: Nadia Durrani

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317220213

Category: Social Science

Page: 302

View: 258

This short account of the discipline of archaeology tells of spectacular discoveries and the colorful lives of the archaeologists who made them, as well as of changing theories and current debates in the field. Spanning over two thousand years of history, the book details early digs as well as covering the development of archaeology as a multidisciplinary science, the modernization of meticulous excavation methods during the twentieth century, and the important discoveries that led to new ideas about the evolution of human societies. A Brief History of Archaeology is a vivid narrative that will engage readers who are new to the discipline, drawing on the authors’ extensive experience in the field and classroom. Early research at Stonehenge in Britain, burial mound excavations, and the exploration of Herculaneum and Pompeii culminate in the nineteenth century debates over human antiquity and the theory of evolution. The book then moves on to the discovery of the world’s pre-industrial civilizations in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Central America, the excavations at Troy and Mycenae, the Royal Burials at Ur, Iraq, and the dramatic finding of the pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1922. The book concludes by considering recent sensational discoveries, such as the Lords of Sipán in Peru, and exploring the debates over processual and postprocessual theory which have intrigued archaeologists in the early 21st century. The second edition updates this respected introduction to one of the sciences’ most fascinating disciplines.

Empires

Empires

Author: John H D'Arms Collegiate Professor of Classical Archaeology and Classics and Arthur F Thurnau Professor Susan E Alcock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521770203

Category: History

Page: 554

View: 209

Scholars in anthropology, archaeology, history and classics discuss empires from Central and South America, Europe, the East and China.

Encyclopedia of the History of Classical Archaeology

Encyclopedia of the History of Classical Archaeology

Author: Nancy Thomson de Grummond

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134268610

Category: History

Page: 1330

View: 142

With 1,125 entries and 170 contributors, this is the first encyclopedia on the history of classical archaeology. It focuses on Greek and Roman material, but also covers the prehistoric and semi-historical cultures of the Bronze Age Aegean, the Etruscans, and manifestations of Greek and Roman culture in Europe and Asia Minor. The Encyclopedia of the History of Classical Archaeology includes entries on individuals whose activities influenced the knowledge of sites and monuments in their own time; articles on famous monuments and sites as seen, changed, and interpreted through time; and entries on major works of art excavated from the Renaissance to the present day as well as works known in the Middle Ages. As the definitive source on a comparatively new discipline - the history of archaeology - these finely illustrated volumes will be useful to students and scholars in archaeology, the classics, history, topography, and art and architectural history.

An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

Author: Lars Fogelin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199948222

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 399

An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism is a comprehensive survey of Indian Buddhism from its origins in the 6th century BCE, through its ascendance in the 1st millennium CE, and its eventual decline in mainland South Asia by the mid-2nd millennium CE. Weaving together studies of archaeological remains, architecture, iconography, inscriptions, and Buddhist historical sources, this book uncovers the quotidian concerns and practices of Buddhist monks and nuns (the sangha), and their lay adherents--concerns and practices often obscured in studies of Buddhism premised largely, if not exclusively, on Buddhist texts. At the heart of Indian Buddhism lies a persistent social contradiction between the desire for individual asceticism versus the need to maintain a coherent community of Buddhists. Before the early 1st millennium CE, the sangha relied heavily on the patronage of kings, guilds, and ordinary Buddhists to support themselves. During this period, the sangha emphasized the communal elements of Buddhism as they sought to establish themselves as the leaders of a coherent religious order. By the mid-1st millennium CE, Buddhist monasteries had become powerful political and economic institutions with extensive landholdings and wealth. This new economic self-sufficiency allowed the sangha to limit their day-to-day interaction with the laity and begin to more fully satisfy their ascetic desires for the first time. This withdrawal from regular interaction with the laity led to the collapse of Buddhism in India in the early-to-mid 2nd millennium CE. In contrast to the ever-changing religious practices of the Buddhist sangha, the Buddhist laity were more conservative--maintaining their religious practices for almost two millennia, even as they nominally shifted their allegiances to rival religious orders. This book also serves as an exemplar for the archaeological study of long-term religious change through the perspectives of practice theory, materiality, and semiotics.

Archaeology and Ancient History

Archaeology and Ancient History

Author: Eberhard W. Sauer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134416196

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 272

Challenging both traditional and fashionable theories, this collection of pieces from an international range of contributors explores the separation of the human past into history, archaeology and their related sub-disciplines. Each case study challenges the validity of this separation and asks how we can move to a more holistic approach in the study of the relationship between history and archaeology. While the focus is on the ancient world, particularly Greece and Rome, rhe lessons learnded in this book make it an essential addition to all studies of history and archaeology.

Archaeology and the Social History of Ships

Archaeology and the Social History of Ships

Author: Richard A. Gould

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139498166

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 645

Maritime archaeology deals with shipwrecks and is carried out by divers rather than diggers. It embraces maritime history and analyses changes in shipbuilding, navigation and seamanship and offers fresh perspectives on the cultures and societies that produced the ships and sailors. Drawing on detailed past and recent case studies, Richard A. Gould provides an up-to-date review of the field that includes dramatic new findings arising from improved undersea technologies. This second edition of Archaeology and the Social History of Ships has been updated throughout to reflect new findings and new interpretations of old sites. The new edition explores advances in undersea technology in archaeology, especially remotely operated vehicles. The book reviews many of the major recent shipwreck findings, including the Vasa in Stockholm, the Viking wrecks at Roskilde Fjord and the Titanic.

Archaeology and History in Roman, Medieval and Post-medieval Greece

Archaeology and History in Roman, Medieval and Post-medieval Greece

Author: William Caraher

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754664422

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 601

Bringing together studies of archaeological method and analysis with detailed work of historical interpretation, the papers here demonstrate how analysis informed by multiple disciplines sheds new light on such important topics as the end of Antiquity, the so-called Byzantine Dark Ages, the contours of the emerging Byzantine civilization, and the complex character of identity in post-medieval Greece. More broadly, this volume shows how the study of the material culture of post-classical Greece has made significant contributions to both the larger archaeological and historical discourse.