A History Of The British Army – Vol. XI – (1815-1838)

A History Of The British Army – Vol. XI – (1815-1838)

Author: Hon. Sir John William Fortescue

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781782891383

Category: History

Page: 413

View: 970

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life’s work “The History of the British Army”, issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so and with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study. According to Professor Emeritus of Military History at King’s College, Brian Bond, the work was “the product of indefatigable research in original documents, a determination to present a clear, accurate, and readable narrative of military operations, and a close personal knowledge of the battlefields, which enabled him to elucidate his account with excellent maps. Most important, however, was his motivation: namely, a lifelong affection for the old, long-service, pre-Cardwell army, the spirit of the regiments of which it largely consisted, and the value of its traditions to the nation. An important part of his task was to distil and inculcate these soldierly virtues which, in his conservative view, contrasted sharply with the unedifying character of politicians who habitually meddled in military matters.” ODNB. This eleventh volume covers the period from 1815-1838, as the tumult of the Napoleonic Wars finally came to a close, two major themes emerged within and without the British Army, that of reform and Imperial expansion.Written as always with superb detail and authority, Sir John details the expansion the new age of the British Empire and its extension into Nepal and their alliance with the Ghurka people, an alliance that survives to this day, and also into parts of India previously untouched and Africa via the Pindari and Ashanti campaigns. A MUST READ for any military enthusiast.

The Origins of the British Army

The Origins of the British Army

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1982076704

Category:

Page: 102

View: 234

*Includes pictures *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading World domination is a vision most kings, queens, and emperors can only dream of, and is a path less visited for good reason. It is one that requires above all, patience, as well as skill, tenacity, and an impenetrable plan of action. The only one to ever come close to this impossible level of prestige is none other than the legendary British Empire. It was under the reign of King Henry VII of England that this ambitious idea of global expansion was first planted. In March of 1496, the king granted an exploratory charter to John Cabot, who would pilot a successful voyage that resulted in the occupation of an uninhabited island in Newfoundland. Though Cabot's second voyage ended in disaster, the courage and will he displayed during these endeavors inspired English explorers to organize more ventures and take to the seas themselves, as they hoped to see just how far they could push the envelope. Today, the British Army is one of the most powerful fighting forces in the world. Its highly trained professional soldiers are equipped with the most advanced military technology ever made. Its international interventions, while controversial both at home and abroad, are carried out with incredible professionalism and little loss of life among British servicemen and servicewomen. Naturally, the history and traditions behind this army are also impressive. Britain has not been successfully invaded in centuries. Its soldiers once created and defended a global empire, and during the Second World War, it was one of the leading nations standing against the brutal Axis forces, leading the way in the greatest seaborne invasion in military history. But it was not always like this. For most of its history, Britain was a patchwork of competing nations. England, the largest of its constituent countries, was often relatively weak as a land power compared with its European neighbors. Moreover, Britain's armies, like those of the other European powers, were neither professional nor standing armies for hundreds of years. The Origins of the British Army: The History of England's Establishment of a Professional Modern Army covers that period before the development of the British Army as it is now recognized. This book examines how a professional standing army emerged from the feudal systems of the Middle Ages to become a centrally organized and professional force, always at the ready when conflict came. And tied to that is the story of a nation uniting, as civil war ceased to be a part of politics and the countries of the union were brought together, often by force. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the British Army's origins like never before.

British Military History For Dummies

British Military History For Dummies

Author: Bryan Perrett

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 047006191X

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 822

A plain-English guide to Britons in battle, from the Roman invasion to the ongoing Iraqi war Charging through the Britain's military past, this accessible guide brings to life the battles and wars that shaped the history of Britain-and the world. The book profiles commanders, explains strategies and tactics, and covers key developments in weaponry and technology.

The British Army in the 19th Century

The British Army in the 19th Century

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1717512410

Category:

Page: 164

View: 869

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won." - The Duke of Wellington at Waterloo Today, the British Army is one of the most powerful fighting forces in the world. Its highly trained professional soldiers are equipped with the most advanced military technology ever made. Its international interventions, while controversial both at home and abroad, are carried out with incredible professionalism and little loss of life among British servicemen and servicewomen. Naturally, the history and traditions behind this army are also impressive. Britain has not been successfully invaded in centuries. Its soldiers once created and defended a global empire, and during the Second World War, it was one of the leading nations standing against the brutal Axis forces, leading the way in the greatest seaborne invasion in military history. But it was not always like this. For most of its history, Britain was a patchwork of competing nations. England, the largest of its constituent countries, was often relatively weak as a land power compared with its European neighbors. Moreover, Britain's armies, like those of the other European powers, were neither professional nor standing armies for hundreds of years. The 18th century was a tumultuous period for the British army, one often overlooked in popular accounts of British history. It began with the formal unification of Britain-a period of great success for the nation's armies-led by one of Britain's greatest generals, the Duke of Marlborough. This was followed by a period of global activity and military reform as the British Empire expanded. Though naval power played a greater part in this success, it led to new obligations and challenges for the army. Even as the empire soared to new heights, the 18th century was one that was initially marked by triumph but ended in failure and decline. The late 1770s and early 1780s brought about a disastrous war for control of the American colonies, during which the British Army was ultimately defeated by colonial militiamen allied with French forces. In the aftermath came a period of decline and complacency, leaving the nation ill-prepared for war with Napoleon and France. Wellington famously referred to his men as the scum of the earth, even as he took pride in their skill and successes. This was an army that took rough material and shaped it into something refined and effective. The demoralized army emerging after the American Revolution became something new and powerful, respected around the world, giving Britain its era of greatest glory. Ironically, the army was a victim of its own success. After having proven its strength against Napoleon and emerging as one of the most respected military and political players in Europe, the British Army took a backseat to what its leaders considered more pressing needs, even as the soldiers were relied on to be garrisoned in colonies across the world. As the Industrial Revolution took hold, its factories and mines drove a staggering period of economic and technological growth. A global empire, supported by the might of the Royal Navy, provided the raw materials and markets the economy needed, as well as military bases and political influence in every corner of the globe. Success was a self-fulfilling prophecy, and Britain's economic and military might let the nation expand its power, absorbing more territory and resources. This ensured the need for a substantial army, as well as the need for the resources to maintain it, but it was not all smooth sailing. There were challenges to be met and periods of complacency to overcome. This book examines the history of the British Army during some of history's most pivotal eras. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the British army like never before.

A History of the British Army – Vol. I (1066-1713)

A History of the British Army – Vol. I (1066-1713)

Author: Sir John William Fortescue

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781908902825

Category: History

Page: 537

View: 744

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life’s work “The History of the British Army”, issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study. According to Professor Emeritus of Military History at King’s College, Brian Bond, the work was “the product of indefatigable research in original documents, a determination to present a clear, accurate, and readable narrative of military operations, and a close personal knowledge of the battlefields, which enabled him to elucidate his account with excellent maps. Most important, however, was his motivation: namely, a lifelong affection for the old, long-service, pre-Cardwell army, the spirit of the regiments of which it largely consisted, and the value of its traditions to the nation. An important part of his task was to distil and inculcate these soldierly virtues which, in his conservative view, contrasted sharply with the unedifying character of politicians who habitually meddled in military matters.” ODNB. This first volume covers the period from the battle of Hastings in 1066 to the end of the Seven Year’s War in 1713. It includes the battles at Bannockburn, Crecy, Agincourt, Flodden, the battles of the English Civil War, Dunkirk Dunes, Tangiers, and the battles during Marlborough’s campaigns. The volume also traces the development of European Armies, infantry, cavalry and artillery, and the specific changes in Britain during the period. A MUST READ for any military enthusiast. Author — Fortescue, J. W. Sir, 1859-1933. Text taken, whole and complete, from the second edition published in 1910, London, by Macmillan and Co. Original Page Count – XXXV and 593 pages. Illustrations — Numerous.

A History of the British Army, Vol.2 (of 2)

A History of the British Army, Vol.2 (of 2)

Author: J. W. Fortescue

Publisher: MACMILLAN AND CO

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 328

View: 220

The work of disbanding the Army began some months before the final conclusion of the Peace of Utrecht. By Christmas 1712 thirteen regiments of dragoons, twenty-two of foot, and several companies of invalids who had been called up to do duty owing to the depletion of the regular garrisons, had been actually broken. The Treaty was no sooner signed than several more were disbanded, making thirty-three thousand men discharged in all. More could not be reduced until the eight thousand men who were left in garrison in Flanders could be withdrawn, but even so the total force on the British Establishment, including all colonial garrisons, had sunk in 1714 to less than thirty thousand men. The soldiers received as usual a small bounty on discharge; and great inducements were offered to persuade them to take service in the colonies, or, in other words, to go into perpetual exile. But this disbandment was by no means so commonplace and artless an affair as might at first sight appear. One of the first measures taken in hand by Bolingbroke and by his creature Ormonde was the remodelling of the Army, by which term was signified the elimination of officers and of whole corps that favoured the Protestant succession, to make way for those attached to the Jacobite interest. Prompted by such motives, and wholly careless of the feelings of the troops, they violated the old rule that the youngest regiments should always be the first to be disbanded, and laid violent hands on several veteran corps. The Seventh and Eighth Dragoons, the Thirty-fourth, Thirty-third, Thirty-second, Thirtieth, Twenty-ninth, Twenty-eighth, Twenty-second, and Fourteenth Foot were ruthlessly sacrificed; nay, even the Sixth, one of the sacred six old regiments, and distinguished above all others in the Spanish War, was handed over for dissolution like a regiment of yesterday. There were bitter words and stormy scenes among regimental officers over such shameless, unjust, and insulting procedure. All these designs, however, were suddenly shattered by the death of Queen Anne. The accession of the Elector of Hanover to the throne was accomplished with a tranquillity which must have amazed even those who desired it most. Before the new King could arrive the country was gladdened by the return of the greatest of living Englishmen. Landing at Dover on the very day of the Queen's death, Marlborough was received with salutes of artillery and shouts of delight from a joyful crowd. Proceeding towards London next day he was met by the news that his name was excluded from the list of Lords-Justices to whom the government of the country was committed pending the King's arrival. Deeply chagrined, but preserving always his invincible serenity, he pushed on to the capital, intending to enter it with the same privacy that he had courted during his banishment in the Low Countries. But the people had decided that his entry must be one of triumph; and a tumultuous welcome from all classes showed that the country could and would make amends for the shameful treatment meted out to him two years before. On the 18th of September King George landed at Greenwich, and shortly afterwards the new ministry was nominated. Stanhope, the brilliant soldier of the Peninsular War, became second Secretary-of-State; William Pulteney, afterwards Earl of Bath, Secretary-at-War; Robert Walpole, Paymaster of the Forces; while Marlborough with some reluctance resumed his old appointments of Captain-General, Master-General of the Ordnance, and Colonel of the First Guards. He soon found, however, that though he held the titles, he did not hold the authority of the offices, and that the true control of the Army was transferred to the Secretary-at-War. To be continue in this ebook...

Military History

Military History

Author: J. W. Fortescue

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107605848

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 377

This 1914 volume comprised of four lectures focuses mainly on the development of the British army and its campaigns.