Inauthentic Archaeologies

Inauthentic Archaeologies

Author: Troy R Lovata

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315426914

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 673

Archaeology has an impact on the public far beyond what any archaeologist would imagine. In this concise, student-friendly look at the public appropriation of archaeology, Troy Lovata examines outright hoaxes, fanciful re-creations, artistic representations, commercial enterprises, and discredited replicas of the past. The book explores examples from around the world and across time to help readers understand how the past becomes social currency for both professional archaeologists and the public at large. Lovata addresses central questions of authenticity, ownership of the past, and the use of archaeology by everyone from artists to multinational corporations. Examples include the Piltdown Hoax, replica Anasazi cliff dwellings at Manitou Springs, Colorado, reconstructed Spanish torreons, and playful Stonehenge replicas. Student exercises, cartoons, interviews, and illustrations add to the pedagogical value of this concise, fascinating work for students in introductory archaeology classes.

Tourism and Archaeology

Tourism and Archaeology

Author: Cameron Walker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315416595

Category: Social Science

Page: 301

View: 974

The global popularity and lucrative potential of tourism has made sustainability a major concern for archaeologists, site managers, politicians, local communities, tourism officials, and other stakeholders. This book establishes new, interdisciplinary ground for tourism and archaeology that will foster a new generation of sustainable thinking and practice. First, three teams of co-authors from both disciplines tackle key conceptual dilemmas: exploration vs. exploitation, education vs. entertainment, and cultural sensitivity vs. embeddedness. Then, international case studies examine site development, marketing, community relations, and other on-the-ground examples of heritage work. The volume launches an important new era of collaboration in this growing field.

Art and Archaeology

Art and Archaeology

Author: Ian Alden Russell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461489900

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 772

This volume presents a collection of interdisciplinary collaborations between contemporary art, heritage, anthropological, and archaeological practitioners. Departing from the proceedings of the Sixth World Archaeological Congress’s ‘Archaeologies of Art’ theme and Ábhar agus Meon exhibitions, it includes papers by seminal figures as well as experimental work by those who are exploring the application of artistic methods and theory to the practice of archaeology. Art and archaeology: collaborations, conversations, criticisms encourages the creative interplay of various approaches to ‘art’ and ‘archaeology’ so these new modes of expression can contribute to how we understand the world. Established topics such as cave art, monumental architecture and land art will be discussed alongside contemporary video art, performance art and relational arts practices. Here, the parallel roles of artists as makers of new worlds and archaeologists as makers of pasts worlds are brought together to understand the influences of human creativity.

Becoming an Archaeologist

Becoming an Archaeologist

Author: Joseph Flatman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108495608

Category: Social Science

Page: 293

View: 652

Becoming an Archaeologist: A Guide to Professional Pathways is an engaging handbook on career paths in archaeology. It outlines the process of getting a job in archaeology, including various career options, the training required, and how to get positions in the academic, commercial, government and charity sectors. This new edition has been substantially revised and updated. The coverage has been expanded to include many more examples of archaeological lives and livelihoods from dozens of countries around the world. It also has more interviews, with in-depth analyses of the career paths of over twenty different archaeologists working around the world. Data on the demographics of archaeologists has also been updated, as have sections on access to and inclusion in archaeology. The volume also includes revised and updated appendices and a new bibliography. Written in an accessible style, the book is essential reading for anyone interested in a career in archaeology in the twenty-first century.

Ideologies in Archaeology

Ideologies in Archaeology

Author: Reinhard Bernbeck

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816526734

Category: Social Science

Page: 410

View: 130

Archaeologists have often used the term ideology to vaguely refer to a Òrealm of ideas.Ó Scholars from Marx to Zizek have developed a sharper concept, arguing that ideology works by representingÑor misrepresentingÑpower relations through concealment, enhancement, or transformation of real social relations between groups. Ideologies in Archaeology examines the role of ideology in this latter sense as it pertains to both the practice and the content of archaeological studies. While ideas like reflexive archaeology and multivocality have generated some recent interest, this book is the first work to address in any detail the mutual relationship between ideologies of the past and present ideological conditions producing archaeological knowledge. Contributors to this volume focus on elements of life in past societies that Òwent without sayingÓ and that concealed different forms of power as obvious and unquestionable. From the use of burial rites as political theater in Iron Age Germany to the intersection of economics and elite power in Mississippian mound building, the contributors uncover complex manipulations of power that have often gone unrecognized. They show that OccamÕs razorÑthe tendency to favor simpler explanationsÑis sometimes just an excuse to avoid dealing with the historical world in its full complexity. Jean-Paul DemouleÕs concluding chapter echoes this sentiment and moreover brings a continental European perspective to the preceding case studies. In addition to situating this volume in a wider history of archaeological currents, Demoule identifies the institutional and cultural factors that may account for the current direction in North American archaeology. He also offers a defense of archaeology in an era of scientific relativism, which leads him to reflect on the responsibilities of archaeologists. Includes contributions by: Susan M. Alt, Bettina Arnold, Uzi Baram, Reinhard Bernbeck, Matthew David Cochran, Jean-Paul Demoule, Kurt A. Jordan, Susan Kus, Vicente Lull, Christopher N. Matthews, Randall H. McGuire, Rafael Mic—, Cristina Rihuete Herrada, Paul Mullins, Sue Novinger, Susan Pollock, Victor Raharijaona, Roberto Risch, Kathleen Sterling, Ruth M. Van Dyke, and LouAnn Wurst

Defining the Fringe of Contemporary Australian Archaeology

Defining the Fringe of Contemporary Australian Archaeology

Author: Rocco Bosco

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527510739

Category: Social Science

Page: 185

View: 965

Popular culture has often presented a mythologised version of archaeology that at times misinforms the general public about broader academic intentions. The fantastic and bizarre continue to capture the public imagination, so that while archaeological teams excavate, survey and record, they occupy the same geographic locations as ghost tour operators and seekers of the supernatural. Not only does archaeology operate within the same geography as modern mythology, but widespread access to technology, from satellite imagery to GPS data, means that enthusiastic amateurs can partake in their own investigations. With limited landscape identification training, an enthusiasm for discovery and strange cultural biases, fringe operators have utilised new technologies to justify old fallacies through variant forms of amateur archaeology. This collection draws on the wealth of work currently being undertaken by contemporary archaeologists in Australia, from rock art observations to art/archaeology experiments and even space archaeology. It explores archaeology on the edge, contextualising the fringe dwellers that operate on the periphery of accepted academia. It also looks at contemporary archaeological theory and practice in relation to these fringe operators, developing approaches toward interaction, in contrast to the more common reaction of repudiation. The relationship between the accepted centre and the outer edge in contemporary archaeological practice and theory unveils much about popular misconceptions and how archaeological spaces can be overlaid with variant mythological and cultural interpretations.

Digging into the Dark Ages

Digging into the Dark Ages

Author: Howard Williams

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781789695281

Category: Social Science

Page: 366

View: 310

What does the ‘Dark Ages’ mean in contemporary society? Tackling public engagements through archaeological fieldwork, heritage sites and museums, fictional portrayals and art, and increasingly via a broad range of digital media, this is the first-ever dedicated collection exploring the public archaeology of the Early Middle Ages.

Lost City, Found Pyramid

Lost City, Found Pyramid

Author: Jeb J. Card

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817319113

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 259

View: 449

Lost City, Found Pyramid: Understanding Alternative Archaeologies and Pseudoscientific Practices explores the phenomenon of pseudoarchaeology in popular culture and the ways that professional archaeologists can respond to sensationalized depictions of archaeology and archaeologists.

Communities and Cultural Heritage

Communities and Cultural Heritage

Author: Valerie Higgins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000228854

Category: Art

Page: 208

View: 194

Communities and Cultural Heritage explores the relationship between communities, their cultural heritage and the global forces that control most of the world’s wealth and resources in today’s world. Bringing together scholars and heritage practitioners from nine countries, this book contributes to the ongoing dialogue on community heritage by analysing impediments to full community participation. The underminin of local communities comes at a high price. As the chapters in this book demonstrate, the knowledge embedded within traditional and Indigenous heritage creates communities that are more resilient to environmental and social stressors and more responsive to contemporary challenges such as climate change, environmental degradation, post-disaster recovery and relocation. Cultural heritage practices often fail to capitalise upon local knowledge and traditional skills and undervalue the potential contribution of local communities in finding creative and resourceful solutions to the issues they are confronting. Arguing that the creation of successful community heritage project requires ongoing reflection on the aims, methods, financing and acceptable outcomes of projects, the volume also demonstrates that the decolonization of Western-focussed heritage practices is an ongoing process, by which subaltern groups are brought forward and given a space in the heritage narrative. Reflecting on trends that impact communities and heritage sites across different geographical regions, Communities and Cultural Heritage will be of interest to academics, students and practitioners of cultural heritage,archaeology and anthropology around the world.

Archaeological Sites as Space for Modern Spiritual Practice

Archaeological Sites as Space for Modern Spiritual Practice

Author: Raimund Karl

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527521018

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 657

Archaeological heritage can be disputed, especially where it is important to religions and their practitioners. While the destruction of archaeological sites in war – often due to religious fervour – is frequently making the headlines, apparently lesser disputes about local heritage sites go unreported. This book focuses on these lesser, but much more frequent, potential conflicts between archaeological heritage management and conservation on the one hand, and practitioners of religious beliefs who use archaeological heritage in their practice on the other. By exploring case studies from Austria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Norway, Romania, Russia, Spain, Sweden and Wales, this book examines the interaction between spiritual practice and monuments conservation. This book will be of great interest to heritage professionals, archaeologists, historians, conservationists and religious practitioners alike, through its exploration of various kinds of interactions between these different heritage communities and their interests in archaeology.

Archaeological Theory in Practice

Archaeological Theory in Practice

Author: PatriciaA Urban

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351576185

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 297

In this concise, friendly textbook, Patricia Urban and Edward Schortman teach the basics of archaeological theory, making explicit the crucial link between theory and the actual conduct of archaeological research. The first half of the text addresses the general nature of theory, as well as how it is used in the social sciences and in archaeology in particular. To demonstrate the usefulness of theory, the authors draw from research at Stonehenge, Mesopotamia, and their own long-term research project in the Naco Valley of Honduras. They show how theory becomes meaningful when it is used by very real individuals to interpret equally real materials. These extended narratives exemplify the creative interaction between data and theory that shape our understanding of the past. Ideal for introductory courses in archaeological theory.

Excavating the Future

Excavating the Future

Author: Shawn Malley

Publisher: Liverpool Science Fiction Text

ISBN: 9781786941190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 323

A cultural study of an array of popular North American science fiction film and television texts, Excavating the Future explores the popular archaeological imagination and the political uses to which it is being employed by the U.S. state and its adversaries.