Intensive Agriculture and Sustainability

Intensive Agriculture and Sustainability

Author: Glen C. Filson

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774811056

Category: Social Science

Page: 227

View: 563

Outlines the advantages of farming systems analysis for understanding intensive agriculture and for evaluating its sustainability. This collection focuses on the trade-offs between profitability and environmental sustainability. It is useful to field practitioners, agricultural and environmental policy analysts, geographers, and more.

Sustainable Agriculture in the American Midwest

Sustainable Agriculture in the American Midwest

Author: Gregory McIsaac

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252021002

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 316

View: 692

This timely collection provides a general overview and detailed discussion of social and technical issues related to moving toward a culture and practice of sustainable agriculture in the American Midwest. It develops the concept that because agriculture does not exist in isolation, sustainability must be understood within the context of the many dynamic natural and social systems characteristic of a particular region - from climate to culture. Scholars from diverse disciplines - ecology, geography, economics, agricultural engineering, anthropology, entomology, climatology - provide the historical and contemporary context for this vital discussion.

Methods and Procedures for Building Sustainable Farming Systems

Methods and Procedures for Building Sustainable Farming Systems

Author: Ana Alexandra Marta-Costa

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400750029

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 497

Showing how the method of sustainability assessment plays a key role in choosing the best agricultural productive mode, this book guides the reader through the process of selecting, from among the various approaches for building farming systems, the method of decision-making that will result in the most appropriate outcome, given the context. Case studies hail from polities as diverse as Portugal and Canada, Argentina and Lebanon. The work thus offers a valuable critical survey of the assessment methods that account for sustainability and economics, and which have developed considerably in the last two decades. The heterogeneous approaches covered here make this volume appropriate for consultation in a wide variety of social, political and geographical contexts.

Options for Transition of Land Towards Intensive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

Options for Transition of Land Towards Intensive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

Author: Rocio Millán

Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

ISBN: 9782889459070

Category:

Page:

View: 340

Climate and environment of Gaia, mother Earth, are under multiple significant stresses. The increase in world population demands large increases in food production, but this must be reached by use of sustainable methods. Emission of climate gasses needs to be dramatically decreased, overall ecological footprints have to be diminished, and socioeconomy of rural areas has to be boosted. These aims are not easy to combine. However, the bio-economy and green solutions may provide mankind with tools of great value both to mitigate pollution and climate change and to adapt to future changes. It is clear that all forms of agriculture cause changes in balances and fluxes of pre-existing ecosystems, thereby limiting resiliency functions. Intensive agriculture in regions that are influenced by industrial pollution, with strong reduction of landscape structures and vast decoupling of energy and matter cycles, has caused stress and degradation of the production base; massive influence has also been exerted on neighbouring compartments. Average yields are probably close to 50 % of maximum yield many places, due to mismanagement of the crops during the production phase, or due to the inappropriate use of key resources. This relationship often leads to a mis-match between input of resources and process outputs, and creates pollution and unbalance in the landscape. Fertilizer runoff and salt accumulation occurs if water supply is in surplus or deficiency, due to soil compaction after use of large machines, and pollinating insects are suffering in regions with large monocultures and high pesticide inputs. These few examples show some of the dilemmas of using input factors in a way that does not fit with the overall conditions. Hence it will be as important as ever to develop new agricultural systems exploiting seasonal growth cycles through intercropping and the integration of mixed perennial crops to ensure permanent availability of plant fractions to be delivered to end users. The problem of degrading soils threatened by overuse, compaction, pollution and loss of biology can only be tackled by a cross disciplinary research approach addressing the entire spectrum of agricultural, environmental and socioeconomic functions of our agricultural systems. While efforts to demonstrate the benefit of site-specific management are relatively recent and have taken various approaches, they specifically refer to variable-rate applications of single inputs, e.g. seeds, fertilizers, chemicals. It is high time to deploy principles of precision agriculture for integrated crop management through combined variable inputs of irrigation water, fertilizers, composts and crop density to improve degrading land and on the other side produce valuable raw products for biorefineries and biobased industries In order to implement such novel production systems, for food and non-food products, the demonstration of land use changes, for biodiversity, for sufficient food and biomass production is essential, with emphasis on the diversity of species and varieties grown, harvested and converted to valuable products. Therefore this Research Topic combines studies demonstrating improved use of soil amendments, nutrients, as well as improved soil fertility for higher resilience against climate stress and recuperation of abandoned or contaminated soils for cropping and animal husbandry. Mixed cropping for high biomass production to create higher added value through the production and transformation of green biomass into novel products is presented as one of the solutions. Applied research for a sustainable and ecologically compatible land use aimed at sufficient food production is as important as ever. Adequate management plans have to be developed from modeling and implemented to increase soil life at the level of the local farm and the region. Growing biomass plants for biorefinery processes should lower production costs, avoid pollution of surface and groundwater, reduce pesticide residues, reduce a farmer’s overall risk, and increase both short- and long-term farm profitability. Such production systems are established amongst the authors of this Research Topic and will allow to obtain an integrated picture of the role of closed cycling loops for N, P and K, and water in an agricultural ecosystem. The next step will be to support decision-making using sustainability indicators and toolboxes as they have been developed for different agricultural systems. The availability of stable research networks of study sites across Europe will help to develop decision support systems applicable across a variety of domains for integrated food and non-food production in the EU, in regards to socio-economy, sustainability and ecology.

Water and Agricultural Sustainability Strategies

Water and Agricultural Sustainability Strategies

Author: Manjit S Kang

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780203847923

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 356

View: 926

According to the United Nations, 77 million people are expected to face water shortage by 2025, if people continue to use water at the current rate. More water than available would be needed to grow the worlds food during the next decade. As a result of scarcity of water, global annual food production losses could reach 350 million tons by 2025.Di

Ecological Intensification of Natural Resources for Sustainable Agriculture

Ecological Intensification of Natural Resources for Sustainable Agriculture

Author: Manoj Kumar Jhariya

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9789813342033

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 655

View: 887

Ecological intensification involves using natural resources such as land, water, soil nutrients, and other biotic and abiotic variables in a sustainable way to achieve high performance and efficiency in agricultural yield with minimal damage to the agroecosystems. With increasing food demand there is high pressure on agricultural systems. The concept of ecological intensification presents the mechanisms of ensuring high agricultural productivity by restoration the soil health and landscape ecosystem services. The approach involves the replacement of anthropogenic inputs with eco-friendly and sustainable alternates. Effective ecological intensification requires an understanding of ecosystems services, ecosystem's components, and flow of resources in the agroecosystems. Also, awareness of land use patterns, socio-economic factors, and needs of the farmer community plays a crucial role. It is therefore essential to understand the interaction of ecosystem constituents within the extensive agricultural landscape. The editors critically examined the status of ecological stress in agroecosystems and address the issue of ecological intensification for natural resources management. Drawing upon research and examples from around the world, the book is offering an up-to-date account, and insight into the approaches that can be put in practice for poly-cropping systems and landscape-scale management to increase the stability of agricultural production systems to achieve ‘Ecological resilience’. It further discusses the role of farmer communities and the importance of their awareness about the issues. This book will be of interest to teachers, researchers, climate change scientists, capacity builders, and policymakers. Also, the book serves as additional reading material for undergraduate and graduate students of agriculture, forestry, ecology, agronomy, soil science, and environmental sciences. National and international agricultural scientists, policymakers will also find this to be a useful read for green future.

The pursuit of sustainable agriculture in EU free trade agreements

The pursuit of sustainable agriculture in EU free trade agreements

Author: Luchino Ferraris

Publisher: Wageningen Academic Publishers

ISBN: 9789086868971

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 127

This book explores the extent to which EU Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) pursue sustainable agriculture in third country parties. It contends that this should be part of a duty for the EU enshrined in the Treaties to promote its fundamental values in its external action. It suggests that the extent to which this occurs in practice, may be reviewed judicially by the Court of Justice of the European Union. Against this background, selected agreements concluded by the EU with developed and developing countries (Canada, South Korea, Ukraine, Chile, SADC countries and Vietnam) are taken as case studies. The author concludes that, in spite of the remarkable progress made hitherto, EU trade policy is still far from being in line with the increasingly strong commitment of the EU to take the lead in the international arena for environmental and climate matters. This work adopts primarily a legal methodology, but it broaches the subject in interdisciplinary terms. It is addressed not only to (EU) policy-makers, but also to scholars of different fields and to the wider public interested in topics that have become of common concern for the future of our planet. With a foreword by Daniel Calleja Crespo, Director General of the European Commission - DG Environment

Sustainable Agriculture

Sustainable Agriculture

Author: Clement Allan Tisdell

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:839545833

Category: Biodiversity

Page: 32

View: 583

Provides some background on concerns about the sustainability of agriculture, outlines and discusses views about what constitutes sustainable agriculture and contrasts the sustainability of modern industrialised agriculture with that of traditional agriculture. Then the question is considered (taking into account the available evidence) whether organic agriculture is more sustainable than non-organic agriculture. Barriers to switching from non-organic to organic agriculture are mentioned. The development of agriculture usually has a serious negative impact on wild biodiversity. Whether or not more intensive agriculture would reduce the negative ecological footprint is unclear but many scientists believe it will do this. Globally, there has been a rapid expansion in the area planted with GM crops. Reasons are given why yields and returns from these crops may not be sustained, and why they may result in genetic losses liable to jeopardise sustainable development. Nevertheless, agriculturalists may still have an incentive to adopt unsustainable agroecosystems for reasons outlined. While genetic losses may be a threat to the long-term sustainability of agriculture, increasing scarcity of natural resources used in agriculture, such as water, and climate change may be more immediate challenges to the sustainability of agricultural production.

Eat Local, Taste Global

Eat Local, Taste Global

Author: Glen C. Filson

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9781771123150

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 190

Eat Local, Taste Global: How Ethnocultural Food Reaches Our Tables shows how the demand for ethnocultural vegetables on the part of Toronto’s South Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean Canadians is at odds with the corporate food regime. How does that regime affect the local food movement and ethnic groups’ access to their preferred foods? This book addresses that question and suggests that the protection of ethnic and national food security and sovereignty strengthens immigrant integration while producing healthy crossover effects for other Canadians. The authors show how culture, food, and migration are intertwined and how access to ethnocultural vegetables is affected by ethnicity, social class, shopping venues, and food prices. Most ethnic vegetables are imported by corporations and ethnic intermediaries and pass through Toronto’s Food Terminal; however, local farmers are now producing some of these vegetables, and alternative forms of agriculture and markets play a significant role in bringing ethnocultural vegetables to our tables. Social justice requires that people have both food security and food sovereignty. Eat Local, Taste Global offers solutions to identified contradictions that include making farmers’ markets more inclusive, improving conditions for migrant farm workers, and making alternative forms of agriculture more feasible. This book will be of interest to rural sociologists and political scientists as well as policy-makers, food activists, farmers, and food security organizations.