Time, History and International Law

Time, History and International Law

Author: Matthew C. R. Craven

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9789004154810

Category: Law

Page: 264

View: 573

This book examines theoretical and practical issues concerning the relationship between international law, time and history. Problems relating to time and history are ever-present in the work of international lawyers, whether understood in terms of the role of historic practice in the doctrine of sources, the application of the principle of inter-temporal law in dispute settlement, or in gaining a coherent insight into the role that was played by international law in past events. But very little has been written about the various different ways in which international lawyers approach or understand the past, and it is with a view to exploring the dynamics of that engagement that this book has been compiled. In its broadest sense, it is possible to identify at least three different ways in which the relationship between international law and (its) history may be conceived. The first is that of a "history of international law" written in narrative form, and mapped out in terms of a teleology of origins, development, progress or renewal. The second is that of "history in international law" and of the role history plays in arguments about law itself (for example in the construction of customary international law). The third way of understanding that relationship is in terms of "international law in history": of understanding how international law has been engaged in the creation of a history that in some senses stands outside the history of international law itself. The essays in this collection make clear that each type of engagement with history and international law interweaves various different types of historical narrative, pointing to the typically multi-layered nature of internationallawyers' engagement with the past and its importance in shaping the present and future of international law.

The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law

The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law

Author: Bardo Fassbender

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199599752

Category: History

Page: 1269

View: 975

This handbook provides an authoritative and original overview of the origins of public international law. It analyses the modern history of international law from a global perspective, and examines the lives of those who were most responsible for shaping it.

International Law and Empire

International Law and Empire

Author: Martti Koskenniemi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198795575

Category: Law

Page: 417

View: 457

By examining the relationship between international law and empire from early modernity to the present, this volume improves current understandings of the way international legal institutions, practices, and narratives have shaped imperial ideas about and structures of world governance.

Peace Treaties and International Law in European History

Peace Treaties and International Law in European History

Author: Randall Lesaffer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139453783

Category: Law

Page: 481

View: 806

In the formation of the modern law of nations, peace treaties played a pivotal role. Many basic principles and rules that governed and still govern relations between states were introduced and elaborated in the great peace treaties from the Renaissance onwards. Nevertheless, until recently few scholars have studied these primary sources of the law of nations from a juridical perspective. In this edited collection, specialists from all over Europe, including legal and diplomatic historians, international lawyers and an International Relations theorist, analyse peace treaty practice from the late fifteenth century to the Peace of Versailles of 1919. Important emphasis is given to the doctrinal debate about peace treaties and the influence of older, Roman and medieval concepts on modern practices. This book goes back further in time beyond the epochal Peace of Treaties of Westphalia of 1648 and this broader perspective allows for a reassessment of the role of the sovereign state in the modern international legal order.

The Epochs of International Law

The Epochs of International Law

Author: Wilhelm G. Grewe

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110902907

Category: Law

Page: 802

View: 105

Wilhelm G. Grewe's "Epochen der Völkerrechtsgeschichte", published in 1984, is widely regarded as one of the classic twentieth century works of international law. This revised translation by Michael Byers of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, makes this important book available to non-German readers for the first time. "The Epocs of International Law" provides a theoretical overview and detailed analysis of the history of international law from the Middle Ages, to the Age of Discovery and the Thirty Years War, from Napoleon Bonaparte to the Treaty of Versailles, the Cold War and the Age of the Single Superpower, and does so in a way that reflects Grewe's own experience as one of Germany's leading diplomats and professors of international law. A new chapter, written by Wilhelm G. Grewe and Michael Byers, updates the book to October 1998, making the revised translation of interest to German international layers, international relations scholars and historians as well. Wilhelm G. Grewe was one of Germany's leading diplomats, serving as West German ambassador to Washington, Tokyo and NATO, and was a member of the International Court of Arbitration in The Hague. Subsequently professor of International Law at the University of Freiburg, he remains one of Germany's most famous academic lawyers. Wilhelm G. Grewe died in January 2000. Professor Dr. Michael Byers, Duke University, School of Law, Durham, North Carolina, formerly a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, and a visiting Fellow of the Max-Planck-Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg.

The Development of International Law

The Development of International Law

Author: Geoffrey G. Butler

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781584772156

Category: Law

Page: 566

View: 754

Butler, Sir Geoffrey and Simon Maccoby. The Development of International Law. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1928. xxxv, 566 pp. Reprinted 2003 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-215-8. Cloth. $70. * Writing in the Yale Law Review, J.P. Bullington observes that "[t]he most striking feature about this work is the method of treatment--quite the most effective which has yet been employed in dealing with the subject. Believing that the changes in international law have been the reflection of changes in the political theory and practice of states, the author has divided his work into three major periods--the Age of the Prince, the Age of the Judge, and the Age of the Concert... Based on a wide knowledge of history filtered through an objective and realistic brain, this book must take its place as one of the most valuable contributions to the history of international law." Yale Law Review 38:843 quoted in Marke, A Catalogue of the Law Collection at New York University, (1953) 566.

The History and Theory of International Law

The History and Theory of International Law

Author: Jean Daspremont

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1789901731

Category:

Page: 1712

View: 279

The essays populating these two volumes provide a comprehensive account of existing scholarly debates on the history and theory of international law. This authoritative collection, with contributions by leading academics, covers a wide range of important topics such as primitive legal scholarship, medieval law and the Grotian Tradition. With subtopics including the markers, heroes and making of international law, and an original introduction by the editor, this extensive collection will appeal to a wide variety of researchers in the field of legal history and theory, as well as students and scholars alike.