Interpreters as Diplomats

Interpreters as Diplomats

Author: Ruth A. Roland

Publisher: University of Ottawa Press

ISBN: 9780776605012

Category: Political Science

Page: 209

View: 662

The purpose of this book is to give an overview of the role played in the relations between nations, throughout history, by translators and interpreters, but especially interpreters. The author has tried to paint a general view of the world in which the political linguist functions, and has functioned, throughout history. This book thus fills a gap left by political historians, who seldom ask themselves in what language the political negotiations they describe were conducted. Nor do they wonder what effect, for good or ill, the level of competence and the personal interests of the interpreter may have had.

Diplomatic and Political Interpreting Explained

Diplomatic and Political Interpreting Explained

Author: Mira Kadrić

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000411362

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 204

View: 402

The role of the interpreter at international meetings of politicians and diplomats is a critical one. This book examines the history of diplomacy and diplomatic interpreting as well as the rules and realities of modern diplomatic relations. Building on interviews with interpreters, diplomats and politicians, it examines language as a tool of diplomatic and political communication, the role of interpreters in diplomacy, and the different forms of interaction and communicative behaviour interpreters face and exhibit. The book covers the different ways in which interpreters manage information, expressivity, and interaction, and what diplomats think about it. Each chapter presents key concepts and definitions; examples from existing literature are combined with interviews conducted with professional interpreters as well as seasoned diplomats and politicians to illustrate their relevance in interpreting practice. With activities for group work and self-study, including analysis and discussion of real-life interpreted diplomatic or political events, this book offers a range of interpreting exercises that encourage students to apply the different strategies discussed in the book. Weaving together the voices of interpreters, diplomats, and politicians with a systematic look at the theory and practice of interpreting in diplomatic settings, this is not only an essential textbook for interpreting students and educators but will also be of interest to professional interpreters and students and scholars of politics and international relations. Additional resources are available on the Routledge Translation Studies Portal: http://routledgetranslationstudiesportal.com

Interpreting U.S. Public Diplomacy Speeches

Interpreting U.S. Public Diplomacy Speeches

Author: Erin Boggs

Publisher: Frank & Timme GmbH

ISBN: 9783732901500

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 154

View: 204

Interpreting U.S. Public Diplomacy Speeches is an attempt to bring a methodical consideration of social context into the interpreter’s approach to analyzing discourse. In this book, speeches delivered by U.S. diplomats to foreign audiences are described using elements of Dell Hymes’ SPEAKING model. This will help interpreters to shape their interpretation of this text type and supply a flexible means of better understanding discourse in any culture. This book is intended as a resource for non-U.S. interpreters who want to know more about interpreting for U.S. government officials or other U.S. American people. It could also interest anyone curious about how cultural context can affect the work of interpreters.

New Insights in the History of Interpreting

New Insights in the History of Interpreting

Author: Kayoko Takeda

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027267511

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 278

View: 353

Who mediated intercultural exchanges in 9th-century East Asia or in early voyages to the Americas? Did the Soviets or the Americans invent simultaneous interpreting equipment? How did the US government train its first Chinese interpreters? Why is it that Taiwanese interpreters were executed for Japanese war crimes? Bringing together papers from an international symposium held at Rikkyo University in 2014 along with two select pieces, this volume pursues such questions in an eclectic exploration of the practice of interpreting, the recruitment of interpreters, and the challenges interpreters have faced in diplomacy, colonization, religion, war, and occupation. It also introduces innovative use of photography, artifacts, personal journals, and fiction as tools for the historical study of interpreters and interpreting. Targeted at practitioners, scholars, and students of interpreting, translation, and history, the new insights presented in the ten original articles aim to spark discussion and research on the vital roles interpreters have played in intercultural communication through history. Now Open Access as part of the Knowledge Unlatched 2017 Backlist Collection.

The Palgrave Handbook of Languages and Conflict

The Palgrave Handbook of Languages and Conflict

Author: Michael Kelly

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030048259

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 527

View: 987

This Handbook maps the contours of an exciting and burgeoning interdisciplinary field concerned with the role of language and languages in situations of conflict. It explores conceptual approaches, sources of information that are available, and the institutions and actors that mediate language encounters. It examines case studies of the role that languages have played in specific conflicts, from colonial times through to the Middle East and Africa today. The contributors provide vibrant evidence to challenge the monolingual assumptions that have affected traditional views of war and conflict. They show that languages are woven into every aspect of the making of war and peace, and demonstrate how language shapes public policy and military strategy, setting frameworks and expectations. The Handbook's 22 chapters powerfully illustrate how the encounter between languages is integral to almost all conflicts, to every phase of military operations and to the lived experiences of those on the ground, who meet, work and fight with speakers of other languages. This comprehensive work will appeal to scholars from across the disciplines of linguistics, translation studies, history, and international relations; and provide fresh insights for a broad range of practitioners interested in understanding the role and implications of foreign languages in war.

Voices of the Invisible Presence

Voices of the Invisible Presence

Author: Kumiko Torikai

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027290021

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 197

View: 892

Voices of the Invisible Presence: Diplomatic interpreters in post-World War II Japan examines the role and the making of interpreters, in the social, political and economic context of postwar Japan, using oral history as a method. The primary questions addressed are what kind of people became interpreters in post-WWII Japan, how they perceived their role as interpreters, and what kind of role they actually played in foreign relations. In search of answers to these questions, the living memories of five prominent interpreters were collected, in the form of life-story interviews, which were then categorized based on Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of ‘habitus’, ‘field’ and ‘practice’. The experiences of pioneering simultaneous interpreters are analyzed as case studies drawing on Erving Goffman’s ‘participation framework’ and the notion of kurogo in Kabuki theatre, leading to the discussion of (in)visibility of interpreters and their perception of language, culture and communication.

The Changing Role of the Interpreter

The Changing Role of the Interpreter

Author: Marta Biagini

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317220237

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 264

View: 437

This volume provides a critical examination of quality in the interpreting profession by deconstructing the complex relationship between professional norms and ethical considerations in a variety of sociocultural contexts. Over the past two decades the profession has compelled scholars and practitioners to take into account numerous factors concerning the provision and fulfilment of interpreting. Building on ideas that began to take shape during an international conference on interpreter-mediated interactions, commemorating Miriam Shlesinger, held in Rome in 2013, the book explores some of these issues by looking at the notion of quality through interpreters’ self-awareness of norms at work across a variety of professional settings, contextualising norms and quality in relation to ethical behaviour in everyday practice. Contributions from top researchers in the field create a comprehensive picture of the dynamic role of the interpreter as it has evolved, with key topics revisited by the addition of new contributions from established scholars in the field, fostering discussion and further reflection on important issues in the field of interpreting. This volume will be key reading for scholars, researchers, and graduate students in interpreting and translation studies, pragmatics, discourse analysis, and multilingualism.

The Dragoman Renaissance

The Dragoman Renaissance

Author: E. Natalie Rothman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501758508

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 523

In The Dragoman Renaissance, E. Natalie Rothman traces how Istanbul-based diplomatic translator-interpreters, known as the dragomans, systematically engaged Ottoman elites in the study of the Ottoman Empire—eventually coalescing in the discipline of Orientalism—throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Rothman challenges Eurocentric assumptions still pervasive in Renaissance studies by showing the centrality of Ottoman imperial culture to the articulation of European knowledge about the Ottomans. To do so, she draws on a dazzling array of new material from a variety of archives. By studying the sustained interactions between dragomans and Ottoman courtiers in this period, Rothman disrupts common ideas about a singular moment of "cultural encounter," as well as about a "docile" and "static" Orient, simply acted upon by extraneous imperial powers. The Dragoman Renaissance creatively uncovers how dragomans mediated Ottoman ethno-linguistic, political, and religious categories to European diplomats and scholars. Further, it shows how dragomans did not simply circulate fixed knowledge. Rather, their engagement of Ottoman imperial modes of inquiry and social reproduction shaped the discipline of Orientalism for centuries to come. Thanks to generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through The Sustainable History Monograph Pilot, the ebook editions of this book are available as Open Access volumes from Cornell Open (cornellopen.org) and other repositories.

Eastward Ho!

Eastward Ho!

Author: Clifford Edmund Bosworth

Publisher: East & West Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1907318119

Category: Middle East

Page: 280

View: 111

The fifteen studies making up this book discuss the interaction of Westerners with the Islamic East and beyond. In the earlier years this involved mainly the journeys and explorations of diplomatic envoys and consuls, merchants and missionaries. But in the early nineteenth century were added such factors as the intellectual and artistic curiosity of scholars and antiquarians lured by exotic lands. Soon tourism exploded as well. The various experiences and discoveries of individuals from all these groups are here described and discussed.

From Paris to Nuremberg

From Paris to Nuremberg

Author: Jesús Baigorri-Jalón

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027269973

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 270

View: 130

Conference interpreting is a relatively young profession. Born at the dawn of the 20th century, it hastened the end of the era when diplomatic relations were dominated by a single language, and it played a critical role in the birth of a new multilingual model of diplomacy that continues to this day. In this seminal work on the genesis of conference interpreting, Jesús Baigorri-Jalón provides the profession with a pedigree based on painstaking research and supported by first-hand accounts as well as copious references to original documentation. The author traces the profession’s roots back to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, through its development at the League of Nations and the International Labor Organization, its use by the Allied and Axis powers as they decided the fate of nations in the years prior to and during World War II, and finally its debut on the world stage in 1945, at the Nuremberg Trials. Available for the first time in English, this account will be of interest not only to scholars and students of interpreting but also to any reader interested in the linguistic, social, diplomatic, and political history of the 20th century.