The Social and Cultural Contexts of Historic Writing Practices

The Social and Cultural Contexts of Historic Writing Practices

Author: Philip J. Boyes

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781789254815

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 374

View: 157

Writing is not just a set of systems for transcribing language and communicating meaning, but an important element of human practice, deeply embedded in the cultures where it is present and fundamentally interconnected with all other aspects of human life. 'The Social and Cultural Contexts of Historic Writing Practices' explores these relationships in a number of different cultural contexts and from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including archaeological, anthropological and linguistic. It offers new ways of approaching the study of writing and integrating it into wider debates and discussions about culture, history and archaeology.

Societies in Transition in Early Greece

Societies in Transition in Early Greece

Author: Alex R. Knodell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520380530

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 555

A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. Situated at the disciplinary boundary between prehistory and history, this book presents a new synthesis of Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Greece, from the rise and fall of Mycenaean civilization, through the "Dark Age," and up to the emergence of city-states in the Archaic period. This period saw the growth and decline of varied political systems and the development of networks that would eventually expand to nearly all shores of the Middle Sea. Alex R. Knodell argues that in order to understand how ancient Greece changed over time, one must analyze how Greek societies constituted and reconstituted themselves across multiple scales, from the local to the regional to the Mediterranean. Knodell employs innovative network and spatial analyses to understand the regional diversity and connectivity that drove the growth of early Greek polities. As a groundbreaking study of landscape, interaction, and sociopolitical change, Societies in Transition in Early Greece systematically bridges the divide between the Mycenaean period and the Archaic Greek world to shed new light on an often-overlooked period of world history.

Athens at the Margins

Athens at the Margins

Author: Nathan T. Arrington

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691222660

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 520

How the interactions of non-elites influenced Athenian material culture and society The seventh century BC in ancient Greece is referred to as the Orientalizing period because of the strong presence of Near Eastern elements in art and culture. Conventional narratives argue that goods and knowledge flowed from East to West through cosmopolitan elites. Rejecting this explanation, Athens at the Margins proposes a new narrative of the origins behind the style and its significance, investigating how material culture shaped the ways people and communities thought of themselves. Athens and the region of Attica belonged to an interconnected Mediterranean, in which people, goods, and ideas moved in unexpected directions. Network thinking provides a way to conceive of this mobility, which generated a style of pottery that was heterogeneous and dynamic. Although the elite had power, they were unable to agree on the norms of conspicuous consumption and status display. A range of social actors used objects, contributing to cultural change and to the socially mediated production of meaning. Historiography and the analysis of evidence from a wide range of contexts—cemeteries, sanctuaries, workshops, and symposia—offers the possibility to step outside the aesthetic frameworks imposed by classical Greek masterpieces and to expand the canon of Greek art. Highlighting the results of new excavations and looking at the interactions of people with material culture, Athens at the Margins provocatively shifts perspectives on Greek art and its relationship to the eastern Mediterranean.

Spear-Won Land

Spear-Won Land

Author: Andrea M. Berlin

Publisher: Wisconsin Studies in Classics

ISBN: 9780299321307

Category: Art

Page: 344

View: 708

More than a dozen prominent scholars offer comprehensive assessments of Hellenistic Sardis, a critical site in western Asia Minor that was one of the most important political centers of both the Aegean and Near Eastern worlds before it was governed as part of the Roman Empire.

A Companion to the Archaeology of Early Greece and the Mediterranean, 2 Volume Set

A Companion to the Archaeology of Early Greece and the Mediterranean, 2 Volume Set

Author: Irene S. Lemos

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118770191

Category: History

Page: 1464

View: 928

A Companion that examines together two pivotal periods of Greek archaeology and offers a rich analysis of early Greek culture A Companion to the Archaeology of Early Greece and the Mediterranean offers an original and inclusive review of two key periods of Greek archaeology, which are typically treated separately—the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age. It presents an in-depth exploration of the society and material culture of Greece and the Mediterranean, from the 14th to the early 7th centuries BC. The two-volume companion sets Aegean developments within their broader geographic and cultural context, and presents the wide-ranging interactions with the Mediterranean. The companion bridges the gap that typically exists between Prehistoric and Classical Archaeology and examines material culture and social practice across Greece and the Mediterranean. A number of specialists examine the environment and demography, and analyze a range of textual and archaeological evidence to shed light on socio-political and cultural developments. The companion also emphasizes regionalism in the archaeology of early Greece and examines the responses of different regions to major phenomena such as state formation, literacy, migration and colonization. Comprehensive in scope, this important companion: Outlines major developments in the two key phases of early Greece, the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age Includes studies of the geography, chronology and demography of early Greece Explores the development of early Greek state and society and examines economy, religion, art and material culture Sets Aegean developments within their Mediterranean context Written for students, and scholars interested in the material culture of the era, A Companion to the Archaeology of Early Greece and the Mediterranean offers a comprehensive and authoritative guide that bridges the gap between the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age.

Male Nudity in the Greek Iron Age

Male Nudity in the Greek Iron Age

Author: Sarah Murray

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316510933

Category: Architecture

Page: 349

View: 618

Naked Male Figurines in the EIA Aegean -- Iconographic and Regional Patterns in EIA Bronze Figurines and the History of Ritual Action -- The Lost Wax Method of Production and EIA Bronze Figurines -- Bronze Figurines, Transformative Processes, and Ritual Power -- EIA Nudity and Ritual in Historical Perspective -- Method and Approach in the Archaeology of the EIA Aegean.

Interpreting the Prophetic Word

Interpreting the Prophetic Word

Author: Willem A. VanGemeren

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN: 9780310872788

Category: Religion

Page: 544

View: 365

The diversity of prophetic voices in the Bible provides a message that is rich and variegated. But the variety of the testimony can be lost by limiting one's interpretations or application of the prophetic word. Interpreting the Prophetic Word helps readers understand the harmony of the voices that reveal God's purposes in redemptive history. Dr. Willem VanGemeren explains clearly and fully the background of the prophetic tradition. He then interprets the message of the major and minor prophets, using historical context and literary form and structure as tools in his analysis. He concludes with an explanation of the relevance of the prophetic word today. Dr. VanGemeren's extensive research and scholarship is presented in a readable way to unlock the door of prophecy for readers. He helps them to interpret prophecy and invites them to listen to the prophets and to lives the prophetic word.

Interpreting the Prophets

Interpreting the Prophets

Author: Aaron Chalmers

Publisher: SPCK

ISBN: 9780281069057

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 778

The prophetic books are some of the most captivating and fascinating texts of the Old Testament. They are also some of the most misunderstood. This book equips the reader with the knowledge and skills they need to interpret the Prophets in a faithful and accurate fashion. Aaron Chalmers leads the reader through the various ‘worlds’ of Israel’s prophets – historical, social, theological and rhetorical – providing the basic contextual and background information needed both for sound and sensible exegesis and for sensitive interpretation and application to today. The book concludes with a helpful chapter giving guidelines for preaching from the Prophets – including advice on choosing the texts, identifying appropriate analogies, and the potential problems and common pitfalls to avoid.

Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature

Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature

Author: Richard A. Taylor

Publisher: Kregel Academic

ISBN: 9780825427619

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 395

"An appreciation for the rich diversity of literary genres in Scripture is one of the positive features of evangelical scholarship in recent decades." —David M. Howard Jr., series editor At one time, Old Testament apocalyptic literature was relegated to the more obscure reaches of biblical scholarship, acceptable to occasionally refer to, but too thorny to delve into deeply. However, in recent decades it has moved to the forefront of research. The rich veins of insight to be mined in the book of Daniel and other apocalyptic texts are being rediscovered. Richard A. Taylor has crafted a handbook to explore those riches and uncover a way to understand apocalyptic literature more fully. Taylor begins with a helpful introduction to the genre; surveys the purpose, message, and primary themes of Old Testament apocalyptic literature; and then discusses critical questions and key works for further study. He also provides guidelines for interpreting apocalyptic texts, followed by Old Testament passages that serve to illustrate those guidelines. While primarily written for pastors and graduate students, Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature is nonetheless accessible to those who simply want to study the texts more deeply than previously possible.

Interpreting Archaeology

Interpreting Archaeology

Author: Ian Hodder

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415157447

Category: Social Science

Page: 275

View: 687

Do we 'tell the truth' about the past? Can we? This volume provides a forum for debate between various approaches. Its multi-national contributors focus on the hermeneutical questions intrinsic to archaeological enquiry.