Jewish Ways of Following Jesus

Jewish Ways of Following Jesus

Author: Edwin Keith Broadhead

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 316150304X

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 288

In this study, Edwin K. Broadhead's purpose is to gather the ancient evidence of Jewish Christianity and to reconsider its impact. He begins his investigation with the hypothesis that groups in antiquity who were characterized by Jewish ways of following Jesus may be vastly underrepresented, misrepresented and undervalued in the ancient sources and in modern scholarship. Giving a critical analysis of the evidence, the author suggests that Jewish Christianity endured as an historical entity in a variety of places, in different times and in diverse modes. If this is true, a new religious map of antiquity is required. Moreover, the author offers a revised context for the history of development of both Judaism and Christianity and for their relationship.

Jewish-Christianity and the History of Judaism

Jewish-Christianity and the History of Judaism

Author: Annette Yoshiko Reed

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161544767

Category: Religion

Page: 535

View: 299

"Jewish-Christianity" is a contested category in current research. But for precisely this reason, it may offer a powerful lens through which to rethink the history of Jewish/Christian relations. Traditionally, Jewish-Christianity has been studied as part of the origins and early diversity of Christianity. Collecting revised versions of previously published articles together with new materials, Annette Yoshiko Reed reconsiders Jewish-Christianity in the context of Late Antiquity and in conversation with Jewish studies. She brings further attention to understudied texts and traditions from Late Antiquity that do not fit neatly into present day notions of Christianity as distinct from Judaism. In the process, she uses these materials to probe the power and limits of our modern assumptions about religion and identity.

Jews and Christians – Parting Ways in the First Two Centuries CE?

Jews and Christians – Parting Ways in the First Two Centuries CE?

Author: Jens Schröter

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110742244

Category: Religion

Page: 415

View: 571

The present volume is based on a conference held in October 2019 at the Faculty of Theology of Humboldt University Berlin as part of a common project of the Australian Catholic University, the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and the Humboldt University Berlin. The aim is to discuss the relationships of “Jews” and “Christians” in the first two centuries CE against the background of recent debates which have called into question the image of “parting ways” for a description of the relationships of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity. One objection raised against this metaphor is that it accentuates differences at the expense of commonalities. Another critique is that this image looks from a later perspective at historical developments which can hardly be grasped with such a metaphor. It is more likely that distinctions between Jews, Christians, Jewish Christians, Christian Jews etc. are more blurred than the image of “parting ways” allows. In light of these considerations the contributions in this volume discuss the cogency of the “parting of the ways”-model with a look at prominent early Christian writers and places and suggest more appropriate metaphors to describe the relationships of Jews and Christians in the early period.

The Gospel of Matthew on the Landscape of Antiquity

The Gospel of Matthew on the Landscape of Antiquity

Author: Edwin K. Broadhead

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161544544

Category: Religion

Page: 378

View: 187

The Gospel of Matthew is an oeuvre mouvante (a work in process), and the dynamics of this process are essential to its identity and function. This understanding of the Gospel of Matthew stands in distinction from the long history of research centered on Matthew the author and his design for the gospel. Focused instead on tradition history-the history of composition and transmission-Edwin K. Broadhead's approach keeps open the dialectical engagements and the conflicting voices intrinsic to the Gospel of Matthew. As a result, the consistently Jewish textures of this gospel are emphasized, there is a broader engagement with the landscape of antiquity, and serious attention is given to further developments in the history of transmission. This focus on the developing tradition thus highlights, rather than suppresses, the viability and the generative potential of such discourses.

Neither Jew nor Greek

Neither Jew nor Greek

Author: James D. G. Dunn

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802839336

Category: Religion

Page: 960

View: 938

This book brings James Dunns magisterial Christianity in the Making trilogy to a close.Neither Jew nor Greek covers the period following the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 c.e. and running through the second century, when the still-new Jesus movement firmed up its distinctive identity markers and the structures on which it would establish its growing appeal in the following decades and centuries. Dunn examines in depth the major factors that shaped first-generation Christianity and beyond, exploring the parting of the ways between Christianity and Judaism, the Hellenization of Christianity, and responses to Gnosticism. He mines all the first- and second-century sources, including the New Testament Gospels and such apostolic fathers as Ignatius, Justin Martyr, and Irenaeus. Comprehensively covering an important, complex era in early Christianity that is often overlooked,Neither Jew nor Greek is a landmark contribution to the field.

Jewish Christianity

Jewish Christianity

Author: Matt Jackson-McCabe

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300182378

Category: Religion

Page: 328

View: 310

A fresh exploration of the category Jewish Christianity, from its invention in the Enlightenment to contemporary debates For hundreds of years, historians have been asking fundamental questions about the separation of Christianity from Judaism in antiquity. Matt Jackson-McCabe argues provocatively that the concept “Jewish Christianity,” which has been central to scholarly reconstructions, represents an enduring legacy of Christian apologetics. Freethinkers of the English Enlightenment created this category as a means of isolating a distinctly Christian religion from what otherwise appeared to be the Jewish culture of Jesus and the apostles. Tracing the development of this patently modern concept of a Jewish Christianity from its origins to early twenty-first-century scholarship, Jackson-McCabe shows how a category that began as a way to reimagine the apologetic notion of an authoritative “original Christianity” continues to cause problems in the contemporary study of Jewish and Christian antiquity. He draws on promising new approaches to Christianity and Judaism as socially constructed terms of identity to argue that historians would do better to leave the concept of Jewish Christianity behind.

Earliest Christianity within the Boundaries of Judaism

Earliest Christianity within the Boundaries of Judaism

Author: Alan Avery-Peck

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004310339

Category: Religion

Page: 501

View: 338

Top scholars of early Christianity and Judaism consider methodological issues, earliest Christianity’s Judaic setting, Gospel studies, and the emergence of later Christianity. These essays honor Bruce Chilton, recognizing his seminal contribution to the study of earliest Christianity in its Judaic setting.

Torah for Gentiles?

Torah for Gentiles?

Author: Daniel Nessim

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725267077

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 276

In the matrix of nascent Judaism and Christianity, the Didache is a Christian-Jewish voice seeking to mediate the Torah to its gentile recipients in a manner appropriate for them. Steering diplomatically between the Scylla and Charybdis of the Law-observant Jerusalem church and Pauline dogma, the Didache is very clear that gentiles do not need to convert to Judaism. On the other hand, the author argues, the Torah, and in particular the second Table of the Decalogue, is universally applicable to everyone, Jew and gentile. While gentiles are not required to keep commands specific to Israel, the Deuteronomic paradigm of the “Way of Life” versus the “Way of Death” is applicable to all. Jesus said “my yoke is easy.” The Didache mandates bearing the yoke of the Lord in order to attain perfection. The yoke it advocates is not as “easy” as one might suppose, yet both Jews and Christians would recognize its morals as largely the same as those that underpin Judaeo-Christian values today. Further, they reflect the requirements that Christian Jews saw as necessary for participation in the Christian community, in a day when that community still looked very much to its Jewish progenitors.

Spaces in Late Antiquity

Spaces in Late Antiquity

Author: Juliette Day

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317051794

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 309

Places and spaces are key factors in how individuals and groups construct their identities. Identity theories have emphasised that the construction of an identity does not follow abstract and universal processes but is also deeply rooted in specific historical, cultural, social and material environments. The essays in this volume explore how various groups in Late Antiquity rooted their identity in special places that were imbued with meanings derived from history and tradition. In Part I, essays explore the tension between the Classical heritage in public, especially urban spaces, in the form of ancient artwork and civic celebrations and the Church's appropriation of that space through doctrinal disputes and rival public performances. Parts II and III investigate how particular locations expressed, and formed, the theological and social identities of Christian and Jewish groups by bringing together fresh insights from the archaeological and textual evidence. Together the essays here demonstrate how the use and interpretation of shared spaces contributed to the self-identity of specific groups in Late Antiquity and in so doing issued challenges, and caused conflict, with other social and religious groups.

The Qurʾānic Pagans and Related Matters

The Qurʾānic Pagans and Related Matters

Author: Patricia Crone

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004319288

Category: History

Page: 521

View: 274

Patricia Crone's Collected Studies in Three Volumes brings together a number of her published, unpublished, and revised articles. the present volume pursues the reconstruction of the religious environment in which Islam arose and develops an intertextual approach to studying the Qurʾānic religious milieu.

Christian Beginnings

Christian Beginnings

Author: Geza Vermes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300195316

Category: Religion

Page: 289

View: 824

DIV The creation of the Christian Church is one of the most important stories in the development of the world's history, but also one of the most enigmatic and little understood, shrouded in mystery and misunderstanding. Through a forensic, brilliant reexamination of all the key surviving texts of early Christianity, Geza Vermes illuminates the origins of a faith and traces the evolution of the figure of Jesus from the man he was—a prophet recognizable as the successor to other Jewish holy men of the Old Testament—to what he came to represent: a mysterious, otherworldly being at the heart of a major new religion. As Jesus's teachings spread across the eastern Mediterranean, hammered into place by Paul, John, and their successors, they were transformed in the space of three centuries into a centralized, state-backed creed worlds away from its humble origins. Christian Beginnings tells the captivating story of how a man came to be hailed as the Son consubstantial with God, and of how a revolutionary, anticonformist Jewish subsect became the official state religion of the Roman Empire. /div

The Early Christian World

The Early Christian World

Author: Philip F. Esler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351678292

Category: History

Page: 1250

View: 518

Since its publication in 2000, The Early Christian World has come to be regarded by scholars, students and the general reader as one of the most informative and accessible works in English on the origins, development, character and major figures of early Christianity. In this new edition, the strengths of the first edition are retained. These include the book’s attractive architecture that initially takes a reader through the context and historical development of early Christianity; the essays in critical areas such as community formation, everyday experience, the intellectual and artistic heritage, and external and internal challenges; and the profiles on the most influential early Christian figures. The book also preserves its strong stress on the social reality of early Christianity and continues its distinctive use of hundreds of illustrations and maps to bring that world to life. Yet the years that have passed since the first edition was published have seen great advances made in our understanding of early Christianity in its world. This new edition fully reflects these developments and provides the reader with authoritative, lively and up-to-date access to the early Christian world. A quarter of the text is entirely new and the remaining essays have all been carefully revised and updated by their authors. Some of the new material relates to Christian culture (including book culture, canonical and non-canonical scriptures, saints and hagiography, and translation across cultures). But there are also new essays on: Jewish and Christian interaction in the early centuries; ritual; the New Testament in Roman Britain; Manichaeism; Pachomius the Great and Gregory of Nyssa. This new edition will serve its readers for many years to come.