The Journals of Lewis and Clark

The Journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9781426206184

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 780

At the dawn of the 19th century, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark embarked on an unprecedented journey from St. Louis, Missouri to the Pacific Ocean and back again. Their assignment was to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory and record the geography, flora, fauna, and people they encountered along the way. The tale of their incredible journey, meticulously recorded in their journals, has become an American classic. This single-volume, landmark edition of the famous journals is the first abridgement to be published in at least a decade.

It Happened on the Lewis and Clark Expedition

It Happened on the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Author: Erin H. Turner

Publisher: TwoDot

ISBN: 0762725842

Category: History

Page: 117

View: 646

Author Erin H. Turner brings to light 44 fascinating events from Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's 1804-1806 expedition from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean and back, including the first democratic vote west of the Mississippi, the remarkable and unexpected reunion of their Indian guide Sacagawea with the clan brother she hadn't seen in years, the day they found a huge whale on the beach, and their discovery of Carolina parakeets--a now extinct species--west of the Mississippi.

Lewis and Clark For Dummies

Lewis and Clark For Dummies

Author: Sammye J. Meadows

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118068734

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 105

The Lewis and Clark expedition was the greatest camping trip in history. It was one of those irresistible American adventures that many people dream of living. This book shares the delightful details of the journey that historians have gleaned from the group’s journals and maps, and also discusses what’s known of the Indian perspective of the expedition. Throughout the book, you find out about Jefferson’s western exploration from his earliest efforts to see the Corps assembled through the aftermath for the explorers, the tribes, and the United States. But the focus of Lewis & Clark For Dummies is on the period between Jefferson’s confidential letter to Congress requesting dollars to mount a western exploration (January 18,1803) and the expedition’s triumphant (and improbable) return to St. Louis (September 23, 1806): forty-two months that changed the world. Join Lewis and Clark as they recruit the Corps of Discovery, meet Sacagawea and various Indian tribes, and set off along the Missouri River on a thrilling, perilous journey. Lewis & Clark For Dummies also covers the following topics and more: The expedition’s people and places Jefferson’s fascination with the West Final preparations of Meriwether Lewis Weathering storms to launch the expedition The discomforts and dangers of the journey Making maps and writing reports A first look at the Pacific Ocean The story of Lewis and Clark doesn’t end with their return to St. Louis. This book will also lead you on an exploration of the fates and lessons of the Corps of Discovery. Find out what happened to Lewis, Clark, and many other key players after their famous journey. And examine the aftermath for the American Indians and the political and cultural ramifications for the United States. You’ll even find the resources you need to plan your own recreation of the expedition as you take the Trail yourself!

Lewis and Clark in Missouri

Lewis and Clark in Missouri

Author: Ann Rogers

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826214150

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 202

View: 575

Annotation In May 1804 Captain Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and the Corps of Discovery set off on a seven-thousand-mile journey to the Pacific and back at the behest of President Thomas Jefferson to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. They spent five months in the St. Louis area preparing for the expedition that began with a six-hundred-mile, ten-week crossing of the future state of Missouri. Prior to this, however, the explorers had already seen about two hundred miles of Missouri landscape as they ascended the Mississippi River to St. Louis in the autumn of 1803 in a practice run of their future voyage. Ann Rogers's Lewis and Clark in Missouri focuses on the Missouri chapter of their grand expedition, an important facet of history that has been slighted in other accounts. By detailing the explorers' journey across Missouri, Rogers addresses this historical oversight. Her use of the journals kept by William Clark, letters written by members of the Corps, and other primary source materialsprovides a, first-hand perspective on what these undaunted explorers encountered on their trek. Rogers's in-depth recounting of their expedition covers all facets of this voyage, from the organization of the exploratory crew to the return back across Missouri culminating in the safe arrival in St. Louis. In between, she touches on the people, plants, wildlife, and landscapes the explorers encountered. Beautiful color photographs and illustrations enrich the text and provide a backdrop for the passages Rogers quotes from the journals and letters. Brief biographies of the expedition's members, including Lewis, Clark, Sacagawea, John Colter, and York, as well as a look at the Lewis and Clarktrail today and the sites along it, round out this highly readable and accurate detailing of the Missouri crossing. Written in a style accessible to all readers, Lewis and Clark in Missouri will be of great interest not only to.

Lewis and Clark

Lewis and Clark

Author: Kate Robinson

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 1598451243

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 140

View: 875

"Examines the Lewis and Clark expedition, including both explorer's early lives, their journey to the Pacific, its impact on the United States and American Indians, and their legacy in American history"--Provided by publisher.

The Lewis and Clark Journals

The Lewis and Clark Journals

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803280394

Category: History

Page: 572

View: 358

The diaries and personal accounts of William Clark, Meriwether Lewis, and other members of their expedition chronicle their epic journey across North America in search of a river passage to the Pacific Ocean and describe their encounters with the Native American peoples of the West, exotic flora and fauna, and amazing natural wonders.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: August 30, 1803-August 24, 1804

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: August 30, 1803-August 24, 1804

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803228694

Category: History

Page: 700

View: 900

"The journey of the Corps of Discovery, under the command of Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, across the American West to the Pacific Ocean and back in the years 1804-1806 seems to me to have been our first really American adventure, one that also produced our only really American epic, The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, now at last available in a superbly edited, easily read edition in twelve volumes (of an eventual thirteen), almost two centuries after the Corps of Discovery set out. . . . This important text has not been fully appreciated for what it is because of two centuries of incomplete and inadequate editing. All three editions previous to this excellent one from the University of Nebraska . . . were flawed by significant omission. . . . Thus my gratitude to the present editor, Gary Moulton, and his assistant editor, Thomas Dunlay, for bringing what I believe to be a national epic into plain view at last. . . . For almost two hundred years their [Lewis' and Clark's] strong words waited, there but not there, printed but not read: our silent epic. But words can wait: now the captains' writings have at last spilled out, and fully, in this regal edition. When the Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition appeared in 1983, critics hailed it as a publishing landmark. This eagerly awaited second volume of the new Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition begins the actual journals of those explorers whose epic expedition still enthralls Americans. Instructed by President Jefferson to keep meticulous records bearing on the geography, ethnology, and natural history of the trans-Mississippi West, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and four of their men filled hundreds of notebook pages with observations during their expedition of 1804–6. The result was in is a national treasure: a complete look at the Great Plains, the Rockies, and the Pacific Northwest, reported by men who were intelligent and well-prepared, at a time when almost nothing was known about those regions so newly acquired in the Louisiana Purchase. Volume 2 includes Lewis’s and Clark’s journals for the period from August 1803, when Lewis left Pittsburgh to join Clark farther down the Ohio River, to August 1804, when the Corps of Discovery camped near the Vermillion River in present South Dakota. The general introduction by Gary E. Moulton discusses the history of the expedition, the journal-keeping methods of Lewis and Clark, and the editing and publishing history of the journals from the time of Lewis and Clark’s return. Superseding the last edition published early in this century, the current edition brings together new materials discovered since then. It greatly expands and updates the annotation to take account of the most recent scholarship on the many subjects touched on by the journals.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: March 23-June 9. 1806

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: March 23-June 9. 1806

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803228988

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 142

The seventh volume of this new, definitive edition of Lewis and Clark's journals begins as the expedition turns homeward. On March 23, 1806, the Corps of Discovery left FortøClatsop, their winter quarters on the Pacific Coast, for the long return journey to the United States. Although they were largely retracing their outbound route, their journals were still filled with descriptions of the country and its people, and new discoveries were yet to be made. They departed from the Columbia River at one point to take an overland shortcut between the Walla Walla and Snake rivers and reached the latter a little below the mouth of the Clearwater. Detained by winter snows at the edge of the Rockies, the Corps camped among the friendly Nez Perce Indians. Here, in modern west-central Idaho, the captains attended to sick Indians and continued their scientific studies while others in the party passed the time hunting and socializing. By June 9 the captains decided to resume their move eastward. According to the Nez Perces, the snow would not be gone from the mountains along the Lolo Trail until early July, but the party, looking homeward, left the Clearwater valley for the flats above the river. Incorporating substantial new scholarship concerning all aspects of the expedition from Indian languages to plants and animals to details of geography and history, this edition greatly expands and updates the annotation of the last one, published in 1904?5.

What Was the Lewis and Clark Expedition?

What Was the Lewis and Clark Expedition?

Author: Judith St. George

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9780448479019

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 0

View: 114

When Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and the "Corp of Discovery" left St. Louis, Missouri, on May 21, 1804, their mission was to explore the vast, unknown territory acquired a year earlier in the Louisiana Purchase. The travelers hoped to find a waterway that crossed the western half of the United States. They didn't. However, young readers will love this true-life adventure tale of the two-year journey that finally brought the explorers to the Pacific Ocean.

The Journey of York

The Journey of York

Author: Hasan Davis

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 9781543512861

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 41

View: 990

"Thomas Jefferson's Corps of Discovery included Captains Lewis and Clark and a crew of 28 men to chart a route from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean. All the crew but one volunteered for the mission. York, the enslaved man taken on the journey, did not choose to go. Slaves did not have choices. York's contributions to the expedition, however, were invaluable. The captains came to rely on York's judgement, determination, and peacemaking role with the American Indian nations they encountered. But as York's independence and status rose on the journey, the question remained what status he would carry once the expedition was over. This is his story."--Provided by publisher.