Liber Coloniarum - The Book of the Colonies

Liber Coloniarum - The Book of the Colonies

Author: Giacinto Libertini

Publisher: Istituto di Studi Atellani

ISBN: 9788890648663

Category: Architecture

Page: 309

View: 703

The study of ancient Roman land surveyors and the Roman system of property boundaries was carried out in the nineteenth century mainly by German scholars. One of them was Karl Lachmann who published Gromatici Veteres (The Ancient Land Surveyors) [Lachmann 1848], a compilation of texts that address aspects of ancient surveying which are fundamental to Civil Engineering as we know it today. Most of the original texts, as published by Lachmann and with some corrections proposed by Thulin [Thulin 1913], was published together with the English translation by Campbell [Campbell 2000]. A complete re-proposal of Lachmann’s text with the Italian translation was recently proposed by Giacinto Libertini [Libertini 2018]. An important part of this collection of texts, the Liber Coloniarum (The Book of the Colonies), together with a rich cartography illustrating the modern persistences of the ancient agrarian boundaries, was subsequently published by the same author [G. Libertini, Liber Coloniarum - Libro delle Colonie, Istituto di Studi Atellani, Frattamaggiore (Italy), 2018]. In order to allow an understanding of this text for a wider audience, it was necessary to have an English translation, which is offered in this work. The Introduction provides a fascinating description of the ancient Roman surveying and setting of boundary signals. The author has also applied Google Earth® and a special software to many of the Roman settlements in the Lazio and Campania regions to define the property grids (centuriationes and strigationes) that are in Italy from Rome to Nocera Superiore (near Salerno). As with the title of this book, many of the technical descriptions presented here are left in the original Latin. The reader is directed to the Glossary for the meaning of the Latin terms used. Wayne Lorenz, P.E. Wright Paleohydrological Institute Wright Water Engineers, Inc.

Public Land in the Roman Republic

Public Land in the Roman Republic

Author: Saskia T. Roselaar

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191591488

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 873

In the first volume in this new series on Roman society and law, Saskia T. Roselaar traces the social and economic history of the ager publicus, or public land. As the Romans conquered Italy during the fourth to first centuries BC, they usually took land away from their defeated enemies and declared this to be the property of the Roman state. This land could be distributed to Roman citizens, but it could also remain in the hands of the state, in which case it was available for general public use. However, in the third and second centuries BC growth in the population of Italy led to an increased demand for land among both commercial producers and small farmers. This in turn led to the gradual privatization of the state-owned land, as those who held it wanted to safeguard their rights to it. Roselaar traces the currents in Roman economy and demography which led to these developments.

Lands, Laws, and Gods

Lands, Laws, and Gods

Author: Daniel J. Gargola

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469632438

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 825

In Lands, Laws, and Gods, Daniel Gargola examines the formulation and implementation of laws regulating the use of public lands, including the establishment of colonies, in Republican Rome (509-27 B.C.). During this period of territorial expansion, the Romans developed the basic legal forms by which they governed captured land, and they constructed the processes and ceremonies by which those forms were translated into practice. Using agrarian law as a case study and focusing especially on rituals that both validated and gave structure to the administrative process, Gargola demonstrates the fundamental connections between religion, law, and government. Essential acts in the administration of agrarian legislation, such as the transfer of land from one party to another and the granting of contracts for public works, depended upon ritual formulas and gestures, often within the context of religious ceremonies. By recovering these formulas and their larger significance, Gargola reconstructs an important dimension of Roman life. Originally published in 1995. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

The Renaissance of Roman Colonization

The Renaissance of Roman Colonization

Author: Jeremia Pelgrom

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192591531

Category: Law

Page: 208

View: 130

The colonization policies of Ancient Rome followed a range of legal arrangements concerning property distribution and state formation, documented in fragmented textual and epigraphic sources. When antiquarian scholars rediscovered and scrutinized these sources in the Renaissance, their analysis of the Roman colonial model formed the intellectual background for modern visions of empire. What does it mean to exercise power at and over distance? This book foregrounds the pioneering contribution to this debate of the great Italian Renaissance scholar Carlo Sigonio (1522/3-84). His comprehensive legal interpretation of Roman society and Roman colonization, which for more than two centuries remained the leading account of Roman history, has been of immense (but long disregarded) significance for the modern understanding of Roman colonial practices and of the legal organization and implications of empire. Bringing together experts on Roman history, the history of classical scholarship, and the history of international law, this book analyzes the context, making, and impact of Sigonio's reconstruction of the Roman colonial model. It shows how his legal interpretation of Roman colonization originated and how it informed the development of legal colonial discourse, from imperial reform and colonial independence in the nascent United States of America to Enlightenment accounts of property distribution. Through a detailed analysis of scholarly and political visions of Roman colonization from the Renaissance to today, this book shows the enduring relevance of legal interpretations of the Roman colonial model for modern experiences of empire.

The Writings of the Roman Land Surveyors

The Writings of the Roman Land Surveyors

Author: J. B. Campbell

Publisher: Soc for the Promotion of Roman stds

ISBN: UOM:39015049518692

Category: History

Page: 570

View: 382

The Corpus Agrimensorum Romanorum, compiled in the 5th century AD, was a collection of Roman surveying manuals, produced by a variety of authors, writing at different times and with very different priorities; authors include Julius Frontius, Aegennius Urbicus, Hyginus, Balbus, Siculus Flaccus, as well as miscellaneous texts. This substantial volume aims to make these sources more accessible by presenting the Latin text with facing English translation, suceeded by a 130 page commentary. The eclectic choice of sources avoids the purely technical texts and includes those which Campbell considers to be most useful for historians, archaeologists and those studying ancient technology. The introduction discusses the text and authors, the origins, development and status of surveying and Roman land division. A series of illustrations, diagrams, a glossary of terms and a large bibliography conclude the volume.

The Intellectual World of Sixteenth-Century Florence

The Intellectual World of Sixteenth-Century Florence

Author: Ann E. Moyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108851398

Category: History

Page:

View: 887

By the sixteenth century, Florence was famous across Europe for its achievements in the arts, letters, and humanist learning. Its intellectual life flourished anew at midcentury with Duke Cosimo and the Accademia Florentina. In this study, Ann Moyer provides an overview of Florentine intellectual life and community in the late Renaissance. She shows how studies of language helped Florentines develop their own story as a people distinct from ancient Greece or Rome, trace the rise of the city's medieval government, and explore how the city evolved into a hospitable environment for letters and the arts. Studies of Florentine art gave rise to art history, while those devoted to Florentine traditions and customs inspired broader questions about how to think about cultural change. Demonstrating how the intellectual activity around language, history, and art related and supported each other, Moyer's book documents the origins of the modern narrative of the Renaissance itself.

Rome's Revolution

Rome's Revolution

Author: Richard Alston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190231613

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 578

On March 15th, 44 BC a group of senators stabbed Julius Caesar, the dictator of Rome. By his death, they hoped to restore Rome's Republic. Instead, they unleashed a revolution. By December of that year, Rome was plunged into a violent civil war. Three men--Mark Antony, Lepidus, and Octavian--emerged as leaders of a revolutionary regime, which crushed all opposition. In time, Lepidus was removed, Antony and Cleopatra were dispatched, and Octavian stood alone as sole ruler of Rome. He became Augustus, Rome's first emperor, and by the time of his death in AD 14 the 500-year-old republic was but a distant memory and the birth of one of history's greatest empires was complete. Rome's Revolution provides a riveting narrative of this tumultuous period of change. Historian Richard Alston digs beneath the high politics of Cicero, Caesar, Antony, and Octavian to reveal the experience of the common Roman citizen and soldier. He portrays the revolution as the crisis of a brutally competitive society, both among the citizenry and among the ruling class whose legitimacy was under threat. Throughout, he sheds new light on the motivations that drove men to march on their capital city and slaughter their compatriots. He also shows the reasons behind and the immediate legacy of the awe inspiringly successful and ruthless reign of Emperor Augustus. An enthralling story of ancient warfare, social upheaval, and personal betrayal, Rome's Revolution offers an authoritative new account of an epoch which still haunts us today.

Between Rome and Carthage

Between Rome and Carthage

Author: Michael P. Fronda

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139488624

Category: History

Page:

View: 738

Hannibal invaded Italy with the hope of raising widespread rebellions among Rome's subordinate allies. Yet even after crushing the Roman army at Cannae, he was only partially successful. Why did some communities decide to side with Carthage and others to side with Rome? This is the fundamental question posed in this book, and consideration is given to the particular political, diplomatic, military and economic factors that influenced individual communities' decisions. Understanding their motivations reveals much, not just about the war itself, but also about Rome's relations with Italy during the prior two centuries of aggressive expansion. The book sheds new light on Roman imperialism in Italy, the nature of Roman hegemony, and the transformation of Roman Italy in the period leading up to the Social War. It is informed throughout by contemporary political science theory and archaeological evidence, and will be required reading for all historians of the Roman Republic.