Ulysses S. Grant: A Bibliography

Ulysses S. Grant: A Bibliography

Author: Marie Ellen Kelsey

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313083273

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 981

In Ulysses S. Grant: A Bibliography, Dr. Kelsey has created an invaluable resource for Grant scholars. The bibliography consists of twenty chapters covering Grant's early life, his careers both as soldier and as president, his associations with various individuals, his post-presidency activities, the role alcohol played in his life, his battle with throat cancer, and ultimately, his tragic death. What makes this book truly special is that Kelsey cites not only the usual books and journals but also a wide variety of nontraditional materials ranging from manuscripts to musical scores. Additionally, she has created a list of cited journals with OCLC numbers, making precise identification of old and obscure journals easy for researchers. Kelsey's sources are varied and multidimensional: she includes scholarly, popular, and ephemeral works to present the fullest possible picture of the legendary president. Kelsey also lists many obscure sources on not only Grant but also his associates, including all his cabinet members. The work includes citations about Julia Dent Grant, other Grant family members, Grant's cabinet members, John Rawlins, William Tecumseh Sherman, Ely Parker, Abraham Lincoln. Libraries of all types could benefit from including this resource in the reference collection. The text might get the most use in historical society libraries, as well as in the libraries of colleges and universities. Public libraries and private individuals interested in Grant and the Civil War would also appreciate the book's comprehensive nature.

Journalism in the Civil War Era

Journalism in the Civil War Era

Author: David W. Bulla

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 1433107228

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 267

"Bulla and Borchard's analysis of newspapers during the Civil War era shows that this was a transformative time for the press and a perilous time for the relationship between government and the press. The authors argue effectively that `the media that emerged [from the first Modern War] laid the foundation for modern news.'"---David B. Sachsman, West Chair of Excellence and Director of the Symposium on the Nineteenth Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga --

Religion and the Radical Republican Movement, 1860-1870

Religion and the Radical Republican Movement, 1860-1870

Author: Victor B. Howard

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813161440

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 754

Kentucky occupied an unusual position with regard to slavery during the Civil War as well as after. Since the state never seceded, the emancipation proclamation did not free the majority of Kentucky's slaves; in fact, Kentucky and Delaware were the only two states where legal slavery still existed when the thirteenth amendment was adopted by Congress. Despite its unique position, no historian before has attempted to tell the experience of blacks in the Commonwealth during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Victor B. Howard's Black Liberation in Kentucky fills this void in the history of slavery and emancipation. In doing so, however, he does not just chronicle the experiences of black Kentucky, because as he notes in his introduction, "such a work would distort the past as much as a book concerned solely with white people." Beginning with an overview of the situation before the war, Howard examines reactions to the emancipation proclamation and how the writ was executed in Kentucky. He also explores the role the army played, both during the war as freed black enlisted and after the war as former slaves transitioned to freedom. The situation for former slaves in Kentucky was just as precarious as in other southern states, and Howard documents the challenges they faced from keeping families together to finding work. He also documents the early fights for civil rights in the state, detailing battles over the right to testify in court, black suffrage, and access to education. As Black Liberation in Kentucky shows, Kentucky's slaves fought for their freedoms and rights from the beginning, refusing to continue in bondage and proving themselves accomplished actors destined to play a critical role in Civil War and Reconstruction.