Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras

Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras

Author: Dustin Booher

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781538138441

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 257

View: 888

Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras: Strategies and Sources is a guide to scholarly research in the field of medieval English literature covering the period 450 CE to 1500 CE. Graduate students and scholars researching this period face many challenges: working in two distinct literary traditions, comprehending multiple languages (Old English, Middle English, Latin, Anglo-Norman, and French), knowing the manuscript tradition for a particular title and the research methodologies for discovering and locating primary sources in the print and digital realms, and the awareness of the overlap and assimilation of literary themes with religious, historical, cultural, and political perspectives. The volume presents the best practices for building a foundation of sound scholarship practices in the field of medieval English literature. This volume explores primary and secondary resources, including general literary research guides; types of library catalogs; print and online bibliographies and indexes; scholarly journals and series; manuscripts, archives, and digital collections; genres; tools for understanding Old and Middle English such as dictionaries, lexicons, thesauri, glosses, etymologies, palaeographies, and text mining tools; and Web resources. The final chapter researches the shifting reputation of the poet, Thomas Hoccleve. Given the interdisciplinary nature of medieval studies, an appendix of additional readings in art, history, music, philosophy, religion, science, social sciences, and theater is provided.

Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras

Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras

Author: Dustin Booher

Publisher: Literary Research: Strategies

ISBN: 1538138425

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 391

Literary Research and the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Eras: Strategies and Sources is a guide to scholarly research in the field of medieval English literature covering the period 450 CE to 1500 CE. The volume presents the best practices for building a foundation of sound scholarship practices in the field of medieval English literature.

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 1 - Old English (Anglo-Saxon) and Medieval Periods

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 1 - Old English (Anglo-Saxon) and Medieval Periods

Author: Petru Golban

Publisher: Transnational Press London

ISBN: 9781912997947

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 153

View: 548

It appears that literary work possesses eternal temporal validity due to its autonomous aesthetic value, whereas criticism provides points of view having temporary and transitory significance. Despite such claims, the vector of methodology in our series of books, dealing with the history of English literature, relies on Viktor Shklovsky, T. S. Eliot, Mikhail Bakhtin, and especially Yuri Tynyanov, whose main reasoning would be that literature is a system of dominant, central and peripheral, marginalized elements – to us, “tradition” (centre) versus “innovation” (margin) engaged in a “battle” for supremacy, demarginalization, and the right to form a new literary system – and the development or historical advancement of literature is the substitution of systems. Roman Jakobson and French structuralism, on the whole, later Linda Hutcheon, with her “system” and “constant”, and Bran Nicol with the “dominant”, to say nothing about Itamar Even-Zohar and his theory of polysystem, to a certain extent Julia Kristeva, and even Homi Bhabha – as well as our humble contribution, by means of the books in the present series, we would like to believe – maintain Tynyanov’s line of thinking and concepts alive, which have developed and emerged nowadays more like a kind of “neo-formalism”.

Medieval Literature

Medieval Literature

Author: Elaine M. Treharne

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199668496

Category: English literature

Page: 161

View: 624

This Very Short Introduction provides a compelling account of the emergence of the earliest literature in Britain and Ireland, including English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, Anglo-Latin and Anglo-Norman. Introducing the reader to some of the greatest poetry, prose and drama ever written, Elaine Treharne discusses the historical and intellectual background to these works, and considers the physical production of the manuscripts and the earliest beginnings of print culture. Covering both well-known texts, such as Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales and the Mabinogion, as well as texts that are much less familiar, such as sermons, saints' lives, lyrics and histories, Treharne discusses major themes such as sin and salvation, kingship and authority, myth and the monstrous, and provides a full, but brief, account of one of the major periods in literary history. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 4 – The Eighteenth Century

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 4 – The Eighteenth Century

Author: Petru Golban

Publisher: Transnational Press London

ISBN: 9781801351874

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 602

It appears that literary work possesses eternal temporal validity due to its autonomous aesthetic value, whereas criticism provides points of view having temporary and transitory significance. Despite such claims, the vector of methodology in our series of books, dealing with the history of English literature, relies on Viktor Shklovsky, T. S. Eliot, Mikhail Bakhtin, and especially Yuri Tynyanov, whose main reasoning would be that literature is a system of dominant, central and peripheral, marginalized elements – to us, “tradition” (centre) versus “innovation” (margin) engaged in a “battle” for supremacy, demarginalization, and the right to form a new literary system – and the development or historical advancement of literature is the substitution of systems. Roman Jakobson and French structuralism, on the whole, later Linda Hutcheon, with her “system” and “constant”, and Bran Nicol with the “dominant”, to say nothing about Itamar Even-Zohar and his theory of polysystem, to a certain extent Julia Kristeva, and even Homi Bhabha – as well as our humble contribution, we would like to believe – maintain Tynyanov’s line of thinking and concepts alive, which have developed and emerged nowadays more like a kind of “neo-formalism”. Focusing on literary practice, applying critical theory and emerging from within our own teaching experience, the books in the present series are theoretical and surveyistic, like a monograph, whereas their more practical and text-oriented aspect should appeal as a student handbook for didactic purposes, in which certain literary works belonging to various writers of different trends, movements, and periods are analysed and compared with regard to their source, form, thematic arrangements, ideas, motifs, character representation strategies, intertextual perspectives, structural or narrative techniques, and other aspects.

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 3 – The Seventeenth Century

ENGLISH LITERATURE ADVANCING THROUGH HISTORY 3 – The Seventeenth Century

Author: Petru Golban

Publisher: Transnational Press London

ISBN: 9781801350884

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 732

The present book is third in a series of works which aim to expose the complexity and essence, power and extent of the major periods, movements, trends, genres, authors, and literary texts in the history of English literature. Following this aim, the series will consist of monographs which cover the most important ages and experiences of English literary history, including Anglo-Saxon or Old English period, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Restoration, neoclassicism, romanticism, Victorian Age, and the twentieth-century and contemporary literary backgrounds. The reader of these volumes will acquire the knowledge of literary terminology along with the theoretical and critical perspectives on certain texts and textual typology belonging to different periods, movements, trends, and genres. The reader will also learn about the characteristics and conventions of these literary periods and movements, trends and genres, main writers and major works, and the literary interaction and continuity of the given periods. Apart from an important amount of reference to literary practice, some chapters on these periods include information on their philosophy, criticism, worldview, values, or episteme, in the Foucauldian sense, which means that even though the condition of the creative writing remains as the main concern, it is balanced by a focus on the condition of thought as well as theoretical and critical writing during a particular period. Preface Introduction: Approaching Literary Practice and Studying British Literature in History Preliminaries: Learning Literary Heritage through Critical Tradition or Back to Tynyanov Genre Theory for Poetry The Intellectual Background 1.1 The Period and Its Historical, Social and Cultural Implications 1.2 The Philosophical Advancement of Modernity 1.2.1 Francis Bacon and the “New Method” 1.2.2 The Advancement of Classicism: French Contribution 1.2.3 The Social and Political Philosophy: Thomas Hobbes and Leviathan 1.2.4 Rationalists and Empiricists 1.3 The Idea of Literature as a Critical Concern in the Seventeenth Century 1.3.1 The English “Battle of the Books” or “La Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes” in the European Context 1.3.2 Restoration, John Dryden and Prescribing Neoclassicism The Literary Background 2.1 The British Seventeenth Century and Its Literary Practice 2.2 Metaphysical Poetry, Its Alternatives and Aftermath 2.3 The Puritan Period and Its Literary Expression 2.4 The Restoration Period and Its Literature 2.5 The Picaresque Tradition in European and English Literature Major Literary Voices 3.1 The Metaphysical Poets I: John Donne 3.2 The Metaphysical Poets II: George Herbert 3.3 The Metaphysical Poets III: Andrew Marvell 3.4 John Milton: The Voice of the Century 3.4.1 L’Allegro and Il Penseroso 3.4.2 Lycidas and Sonnets 3.4.3 Paradise Lost and the Epic of Puritanism 3.5 John Dryden and His Critical Theory and Literary Practice Conclusion: The Literature of a Turbulent Age References and Suggestions for Further Reading Index

The Facts on File Companion to British Poetry Before 1600

The Facts on File Companion to British Poetry Before 1600

Author: Michelle M. Sauer

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438108346

Category: Electronic books

Page: 529

View: 154

Some of the most important authors in British poetry left their mark onliterature before 1600, including Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spenser, and, of course, William Shakespeare. "The Facts On File Companion to British Poetry before 1600"is an encyclopedic guide to British poetry from the beginnings to theyear 1600, featuring approximately 600 entries ranging in length from300 to 2,500 words.

A History of Old English Literature

A History of Old English Literature

Author: Robert D. Fulk

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 0631223975

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 358

View: 613

This timely introduction to Old English literature focuses on the production and reception of Old English texts, and on their relation to Anglo-Saxon history and culture. Introduces Old English texts and considers their relation to Anglo-Saxon culture. Responds to renewed emphasis on historical and cultural contexts in the field of medieval studies. Treats virtually the entire range of textual types preserved in Old English. Considers the production, reception and uses of Old English texts. Integrates the Anglo-Latin backgrounds crucial to understanding Old English literature. Offers very extensive bibliographical guidance. Demonstrates that Anglo-Saxon studies is uniquely placed to contribute to current literary debates.

Palimpsests and the Literary Imagination of Medieval England

Palimpsests and the Literary Imagination of Medieval England

Author: Tatjana Silec

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230118805

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 267

View: 636

Witnesses to the disappearance of a text, palimpsest manuscripts bear the marks of their own genesis, with their original inscription rubbed out and written over on the same parchment. This collection explores analogies of erasure and rewriting observed in editorial and literary practices underlying the production of texts from medieval England.

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

Author: David Hopkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199587230

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 771

View: 678

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature (OHCREL) is designed to offer a comprehensive investigation of the numerous and diverse ways in which literary texts of the classical world have stimulated responses and refashioning by English writers. Covering the full range of English literature from the early Middle Ages to the present day, OHCREL both synthesizes existing scholarship and presents cutting-edge new research, employing an international team of expert contributors for each of the five volumes. OHCREL endeavours to interrogate, rather than inertly reiterate, conventional assumptions about literary 'periods', the processes of canon-formation, and the relations between literary and non-literary discourse. It conceives of 'reception' as a complex process of dialogic exchange and, rather than offering large cultural generalizations, it engages in close critical analysis of literary texts. It explores in detail the ways in which English writers' engagement with classical literature casts as much light on the classical originals as it does on the English writers' own cultural context. This first volume, and fourth to appear in the series, covers the years c.800-1558, and surveys the reception and transformation of classical literary culture in England from the Anglo-Saxon period up to the Henrician era. Chapters on the classics in the medieval curriculum, the trivium and quadrivium, medieval libraries, and medieval mythography provide context for medieval reception. The reception of specific classical authors and traditions is represented in chapters on Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, the matter of Troy, Boethius, moral philosophy, historiography, biblical epics, English learning in the twelfth century, and the role of antiquity in medieval alliterative poetry. The medieval section includes coverage of Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate, while the part of the volume dedicated to the later period explores early English humanism, humanist education, and libraries in the Henrician era, and includes chapters that focus on the classicism of Skelton, Douglas, Wyatt, and Surrey.

Living Through Conquest

Living Through Conquest

Author: Elaine Treharne

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199585250

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 299

Living through Conquest is the first ever investigation of the political clout of English from the reign of Cnut to the earliest decades of the thirteenth century. It focuses on why and how the English language was used by kings and their courts and by leading churchmen and monastic institutions at key moments from 1020 to 1220.

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

Author: Rita Copeland

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191077777

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 770

View: 346

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature (OHCREL) is designed to offer a comprehensive investigation of the numerous and diverse ways in which literary texts of the classical world have stimulated responses and refashioning by English writers. Covering the full range of English literature from the early Middle Ages to the present day, OHCREL both synthesizes existing scholarship and presents cutting-edge new research, employing an international team of expert contributors for each of the five volumes. OHCREL endeavours to interrogate, rather than inertly reiterate, conventional assumptions about literary 'periods', the processes of canon-formation, and the relations between literary and non-literary discourse. It conceives of 'reception' as a complex process of dialogic exchange and, rather than offering large cultural generalizations, it engages in close critical analysis of literary texts. It explores in detail the ways in which English writers' engagement with classical literature casts as much light on the classical originals as it does on the English writers' own cultural context. This first volume, and fourth to appear in the series, covers the years c.800-1558, and surveys the reception and transformation of classical literary culture in England from the Anglo-Saxon period up to the Henrician era. Chapters on the classics in the medieval curriculum, the trivium and quadrivium, medieval libraries, and medieval mythography provide context for medieval reception. The reception of specific classical authors and traditions is represented in chapters on Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, the matter of Troy, Boethius, moral philosophy, historiography, biblical epics, English learning in the twelfth century, and the role of antiquity in medieval alliterative poetry. The medieval section includes coverage of Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate, while the part of the volume dedicated to the later period explores early English humanism, humanist education, and libraries in the Henrician era, and includes chapters that focus on the classicism of Skelton, Douglas, Wyatt, and Surrey.