Margins and Mainstreams

Margins and Mainstreams

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295973390

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 488

In a thoughtful and stimulating contribution to the current debate about the meaning to the larger society of multiculturalism, Gary Okihiro explores the significance of Asian Americans in American history and culture. In six provocative and engaging essays he examines the Asian American experience from the perspectives of historical consciousness, race, gender, class, and culture. Much talk these days revolves around the idea of the mainstream, about the core of American history and culture, and about the dangers of straying from the original formulations that have made this country great. Pluralism and diversity, many argue, only serve to divide and fracture the nation. The core, rooted in Western civilization and the canon of "great books" must be recovered and preserved, and those on the margins, most notably racial minorities, must be absorbed into the mainstream. Or so the argument goes. Margins and Mainstreams argues that the core values and ideals of the nation emanate today not from the so-called mainstream but from the margins, from among Asian and African Americans, Latinos and American Indians, and women. Those groups, in their struggles for equality, have helped to preserve and advance the founders' ideals and have made America a more democratic place for all. While exploring anew the meanings of Asian American social history, the book reexamines the intellectual foundations and assumptions of the field of Asian American studies. It exposes the dominance of Eurocentrism and other hierarchies in the major theories that inform the field. It contextualizes the Asian American experience with that of African Americans and Latinos, and it advocates the intellectual convergence of Asian, Asian American, and African American studies.

Margins and Mainstreams

Margins and Mainstreams

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295805368

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 590

In this classic book on the meaning of multiculturalism in larger American society, Gary Okihiro explores the significance of Asian American experiences from the perspectives of historical consciousness, race, gender, class, and culture. While exploring anew the meanings of Asian American social history, Okihiro argues that the core values and ideals of the nation emanate today not from the so-called mainstream but from the margins, from among Asian and African Americans, Latinos and American Indians, women, and the gay and lesbian community. Those groups in their struggles for equality, have helped to preserve and advance the founders� ideals and have made America a more democratic place for all.

Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-Between

Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-Between

Author: Karen Trimmer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138089850

Category: Education

Page: 282

View: 749

This book explores the complexities of investigating minorities, majorities, boundaries and borders, and the experiences of researchers who choose to work in these spaces. It engages with issues of ethics, disclosure and representation, and contends with and seeks to contribute to emerging debates around power and the positioning of researchers and participants. Chapters examine epistemologies that shape researchers¿ beliefs about the forms of research that are valued in educational research and theory, and consider the importance of research that genuinely seeks to explore voice, culture, story, authenticity and identity. Resisting the backdrop of standardisation, performativity and accountability agendas pervading governments and organisations, the book attends to the stories of real people, to understand regional and rural landscapes, to examine culture and the human condition and to give voice to those at the fringes of society who remain largely neglected and unheard. Drawing largely on studies from Australia, the book provides an overview of the many types of research being engaged in, revealing the value of different kinds of research, and gaining insight into how meaning and findings are disseminated in research and educational sectors and back into the contexts where research takes place. Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-between will be of key interest to early career researchers and academics internationally, as well as postgraduate students completing research methods courses in the field of education, and the wider social sciences.

From Margins to Mainstream

From Margins to Mainstream

Author: Carol Lazzaro-Weis

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812206708

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 439

Carol Lazzaro-Weiss studies the fiction of twenty-five contemporary Italian women writers. Arguing for a notion of gender and genre, she runs counter to many Anglo-American and French feminist theorists who contend that traditional genres cannot readily serve as vehicles for feminist expression.

Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-between

Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-between

Author: Karen Trimmer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317694595

Category: Education

Page: 282

View: 961

This book explores the complexities of investigating minorities, majorities, boundaries and borders, and the experiences of researchers who choose to work in these spaces. It engages with issues of ethics, disclosure and representation, and contends with and seeks to contribute to emerging debates around power and the positioning of researchers and participants. Chapters examine epistemologies that shape researchers’ beliefs about the forms of research that are valued in educational research and theory, and consider the importance of research that genuinely seeks to explore voice, culture, story, authenticity and identity. Resisting the backdrop of standardisation, performativity and accountability agendas pervading governments and organisations, the book attends to the stories of real people, to understand regional and rural landscapes, to examine culture and the human condition and to give voice to those at the fringes of society who remain largely neglected and unheard. Drawing largely on studies from Australia, the book provides an overview of the many types of research being engaged in, revealing the value of different kinds of research, and gaining insight into how meaning and findings are disseminated in research and educational sectors and back into the contexts where research takes place. Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-between will be of key interest to early career researchers and academics internationally, as well as postgraduate students completing research methods courses in the field of education, and the wider social sciences.

From the Margins to the Mainstream

From the Margins to the Mainstream

Author: Hugo Gorringe

Publisher: SAGE Publications India

ISBN: 9789351506225

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 780

A brilliant analysis of the socio-political processes that help us understand the challenges faced by marginalized populations for representation and recognition in India. The premise of democratic politics is that all citizens are equal and have an equal right to a say in national politics. This definition of democracy, however, is observed far more in the breach than in practice. Muslims, Dalits and Adivasis continue their struggle to seek entry into the institution from which they seem to be barred. Drawing on in-depth case studies the book explores how marginalized groups that achieve a degree of political inclusion often discover that it amounts to ‘adverse incorporation’ which is disempowering because it requires them to moderate or abandon key demands. The book is a unique work on the irony of ‘institutionalization’.

Arab Detroit

Arab Detroit

Author: Nabeel Abraham

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814339787

Category: History

Page: 630

View: 677

Metropolitan Detroit is home to one of the largest, most diverse Arab communities outside the Middle East, yet the complex world Arabic-speaking immigrants have created there is barely visible on the landscape of ethnic America. In this volume, Nabeel Abraham and Andrew Shryock bring together the work of twenty-five contributors to create a richly detailed portrait of Arab Detroit. The book goes behind the bulletproof glass in Iraqi Chaldean liquor stores. It explores the role of women in a Sunni mosque and the place of nationalist politics in a Coptic church. It follows the careers of wedding singers, Arabic calligraphers,restaurant owners, and pastry chefs. It examines the agendas of Shia Muslim activists and Washington-based lobbyists and looks at the intimate politics of marriage, family honor, and adolescent rebellion. Memoirs and poems by Lebanese, Chaldean, Yemeni, and Palestinian writers anchor the book in personal experience, while over fifty photographs provide a backdrop of vivid, often unexpected, images. In their efforts to represent an ethnic/immigrant community that is flourishing on the margins of pluralist discourse, the contributors to this book break new ground in the study of identity politics, transnationalism, and diaspora cultures.

The Limits of Human Rights

The Limits of Human Rights

Author: Bardo Fassbender

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198824756

Category: Law

Page: 417

View: 334

What are the limits of human rights, and what do these limits mean? This volume engages critically and constructively with this question to provide a distinct contribution to the contemporary discussion on human rights. Fassbender and Traisbach, along with a group of leading experts in the field, examine the issue from multiple disciplinary perspectives, analysing the limits of our current discourse of human rights. It does so in an original way, and without attempting to deconstruct, or deny, human rights. Each contribution is supplemented by an engaging comment which furthers this important discussion. This combination of perspectives paves the way for further thought for scholars, practitioners, students, and the wider public. Ultimately, this volume provides an exceptionally rich spectrum of viewpoints and arguments across disciplines to offer fresh insights into human rights and its limitations.

Mainstream and Margins

Mainstream and Margins

Author: Peter I. Rose

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351318549

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 227

This volume of commentaries on racial and ethnic relations is a sociological assessment of a changing society and a personal statement about many of the most pressing racial issues since the 1954 Brown-Supreme court decision. From the perspective of humanistic sociology, Peter Rose shows that sociology need not be a cold, artless science and argues that sociological enterprise should treat future as well as past and present issues.

A New History of Asian America

A New History of Asian America

Author: Shelley Sang-Hee Lee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135071059

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 546

A New History of Asian America is a fresh and up-to-date history of Asians in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Drawing on current scholarship, Shelley Lee brings forward the many strands of Asian American history, highlighting the distinctive nature of the Asian American experience while placing the narrative in the context of the major trajectories and turning points of U.S. history. Covering the history of Filipinos, Koreans, Asian Indians, and Southeast Indians as well as Chinese and Japanese, the book gives full attention to the diversity within Asian America. A robust companion website features additional resources for students, including primary documents, a timeline, links, videos, and an image gallery. From the building of the transcontinental railroad to the celebrity of Jeremy Lin, people of Asian descent have been involved in and affected by the history of America. A New History of Asian America gives twenty-first-century students a clear, comprehensive, and contemporary introduction to this vital history.

From the Margins to the Mainstream

From the Margins to the Mainstream

Author: Hugo Gorringe

Publisher: SAGE Publications India

ISBN: 9789351506249

Category: Political Science

Page: 332

View: 291

A brilliant analysis of the socio-political processes that help us understand the challenges faced by marginalized populations for representation and recognition in India. The premise of democratic politics is that all citizens are equal and have an equal right to a say in national politics. This definition of democracy, however, is observed far more in the breach than in practice. Muslims, Dalits and Adivasis continue their struggle to seek entry into the institution from which they seem to be barred. Drawing on in-depth case studies the book explores how marginalized groups that achieve a degree of political inclusion often discover that it amounts to ‘adverse incorporation’ which is disempowering because it requires them to moderate or abandon key demands. The book is a unique work on the irony of ‘institutionalization’.

Mainstream and Margins Revisited

Mainstream and Margins Revisited

Author: Peter Isaac Rose

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351507752

Category: Social Science

Page: 358

View: 571

When his book Mainstream and Margins was published in 1983, Peter Rose's writings on American minorities and those who studied them painted a vivid picture of what life was like in America for Jews, blacks, and other minorities in the United States. Now, a third of a century later, he revisits the topic, with sixteen new chapters, in addition to seven from the original edition. Newer content covers immigration and American refugee policy; reexamines the term "model minority," first used to describe Jews, but now applied to Asian Americans; and the resurgence of nativism both in regard to new migrants from Latin America and to the growth of Islamophobia since the 9/11 attacks. Rose also reassesses what is still one of the most controversial documents about race and class ever written, Daniel Patrick Moynihan's "The Negro Family: A Case for National Action." Rose writes about other authors who have addressed many of the principal concerns of this book, ranging from novelists Tom Wolfe and Harper Lee to sociologists David Riesman, Robin M. Williams, Jr., and William Julius Wilson. Historical tensions between Jews and African Americans and debates about "liberal" vs. "corporate" pluralism seen from the perspective of both whites and non-whites are also discussed in this seminal volume by a master on the subject.