Mathematics and the Roots of Postmodern Thought

Mathematics and the Roots of Postmodern Thought

Author: Vladimir Tasi¢c

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195139674

Category: Mathematics

Page: 208

View: 950

1. Introduction. 2. Around the Cartesian Circuit. 2.1. Imagination. 2.2. Intuition. 2.3. Counting to One. 3. Space Oddity and Linguistic Turn. 4. Wound of Language. 4.1. Being and Time Continuum. 4.2. Language and Will. 5. Beyond the Code. 5.1. Medium of Free Becoming. 5.2. Nonpresence of Identity. 6. The Expired Subject. 6.1. Empire of Signs. 6.2. Mechanical Bride. 7. The Vanishing Author. 8. Say Hello to the Structure Bubble. 8.1. Algebra of Language. 8.2. Functionalism Chic. 9. Don't Think, Look. 9.1. Interpolating the Self. 9.2. Language Games. 9.3. Thermostats "R" Us. 10. Postmo.

Postmodern Philosophy and the Scientific Turn

Postmodern Philosophy and the Scientific Turn

Author: Dorothea E. Olkowski

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253001146

Category: Philosophy

Page: 248

View: 480

A groundbreaking, interdisciplinary approach to the study of consciousness: “Beautifully written, engaging throughout, and captivating” (Claire Colebrook, The Pennsylvania State University). What can come of a scientific engagement with postmodern philosophy? Some scientists have claimed that the social sciences and humanities have nothing to contribute, except perhaps peripherally, to their research. Dorothea E. Olkowski shows that mathematics itself—the historic link between science and philosophy—plays a fundamental role in the development of the worldviews that drive both fields. Focusing on language, its usage and expression of worldview, she develops a phenomenological account of human thought and action to explicate the role of philosophy in the sciences. Olkowski proposes a model of phenomenology, both scientific and philosophical, that helps make sense of reality and composes an ethics for dealing with unpredictability in our world.

Deleuze, Bergson, Merleau-Ponty

Deleuze, Bergson, Merleau-Ponty

Author: Dorothea E. Olkowski

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253054722

Category: Philosophy

Page: 180

View: 538

Deleuze, Bergson, Merleau-Ponty: The Logic and Pragmatics of Creation, Affective Life, and Perception offers the only full-length examination of the relationships between Deleuze, Bergson and Merleau-Ponty. Henri Bergson (1859–1941), Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961), and Gilles Deleuze (1925–1995) succeeded one another as leading voices in French philosophy over a span of 136 years. Their relationship to one another's work involved far more than their overlapping lifetimes. Bergson became both the source of philosophical insight and a focus of criticism for Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze. Deleuze criticized Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology as well as his interest in cognitive and natural science. Author Dorothea Olkowski points out that each of these philosophers situated their thought in relation to their understandings of crucial developments and theories taken up in the history and philosophy of science, and this has been difficult for Continental philosophy to grasp. She articulates the differences between these philosophers with respect to their disparate approaches to the physical sciences and with how their views of science function in relation to their larger philosophical projects. In Deleuze, Bergson, Merleau-Ponty, Olkowski examines the critical areas of the structure of time and memory, the structure of consciousness, and the question of humans' relation to nature. She reveals that these philosophers are working from inside one another's ideas and are making strong claims about time, consciousness, reality, and their effects on humanity that converge and diverge. The result is a clearer picture of the intertwined workings of Continental philosophy and its fundamental engagement with the sciences.

The History of Reason in the Age of Madness

The History of Reason in the Age of Madness

Author: John Iliopoulos

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474257763

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 855

The History of Reason in the Age of Madness revolves around three axes: the Foucauldian critical-historical method, its relationship with enlightenment critique, and the way this critique is implemented in Foucault's seminal work, History of Madness. Foucault's exploration of the origins of psychiatry applies his own theories of power, truth and reason and draws on Kant's philosophy, shedding new light on the way we perceive the birth and development of psychiatric practice. Following Foucault's adoption of 'limit attitude', which investigates the limits of our thinking as points of disruption and renewal of established frames of reference, this book dispels the widely accepted belief that psychiatry represents the triumph of rationalism by somehow conquering madness and turning it into an object of neutral, scientific perception. It examines the birth of psychiatry in its full complexity: in the late eighteenth century, doctors were not simply rationalists but also alienists, philosophers of finitude who recognized madness as an experience at the limits of reason, introducing a discourse which conditioned the formation of psychiatry as a type of medical activity. Since that event, the same type of recognition, the same anthropological confrontation with madness has persisted beneath the calm development of psychiatric rationality, undermining the supposed linearity, absolute authority and steady progress of psychiatric positivism. Iliopoulos argues that Foucault's critique foregrounds this anthropological problematic as indispensable for psychiatry, encouraging psychiatrists to become aware of the epistemological limitations of their practice, and also to review the ethical and political issues which madness introduces into the apparent neutrality of current psychiatric discourse.

Ideas at the Intersection of Mathematics, Philosophy, and Theology

Ideas at the Intersection of Mathematics, Philosophy, and Theology

Author: Carlos R. Bovell

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725246157

Category: Philosophy

Page: 142

View: 129

How do mathematics, philosophy, and theology intersect? In Ideas at the Intersection of Mathematics, Philosophy, and Theology, Carlos Bovell proposes a wide range of possibilities. In a series of eleven thought-provoking essays, the author explores such topics as the place of mathematics in the work of Husserl and Heidegger, the importance of infinity for the Christian conception of God, and the impact of Godel's Theorem on the Westminster Confession of Faith. This book will appeal to readers with backgrounds in mathematics, philosophy, and theology and can be used in core, interdisciplinary modules that contain a math component.

The Map and the Territory

The Map and the Territory

Author: Shyam Wuppuluri

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319724782

Category: Science

Page: 641

View: 175

This volume presents essays by pioneering thinkers including Tyler Burge, Gregory Chaitin, Daniel Dennett, Barry Mazur, Nicholas Humphrey, John Searle and Ian Stewart. Together they illuminate the Map/Territory Distinction that underlies at the foundation of the scientific method, thought and the very reality itself. It is imperative to distinguish Map from the Territory while analyzing any subject but we often mistake map for the territory. Meaning for the Reference. Computational tool for what it computes. Representations are handy and tempting that we often end up committing the category error of over-marrying the representation with what is represented, so much so that the distinction between the former and the latter is lost. This error that has its roots in the pedagogy often generates a plethora of paradoxes/confusions which hinder the proper understanding of the subject. What are wave functions? Fields? Forces? Numbers? Sets? Classes? Operators? Functions? Alphabets and Sentences? Are they a part of our map (theory/representation)? Or do they actually belong to the territory (Reality)? Researcher, like a cartographer, clothes (or creates?) the reality by stitching multitudes of maps that simultaneously co-exist. A simple apple, for example, can be analyzed from several viewpoints beginning with evolution and biology, all the way down its microscopic quantum mechanical components. Is there a reality (or a real apple) out there apart from these maps? How do these various maps interact/intermingle with each other to produce a coherent reality that we interact with? Or do they not? Does our brain uses its own internal maps to facilitate “physicist/mathematician” in us to construct the maps about the external territories in turn? If so, what is the nature of these internal maps? Are there meta-maps? Evolution definitely fences our perception and thereby our ability to construct maps, revealing to us only those aspects beneficial for our survival. But the question is, to what extent? Is there a way out of the metaphorical Platonic cave erected around us by the nature? While “Map is not the territory” as Alfred Korzybski remarked, join us in this journey to know more, while we inquire on the nature and the reality of the maps which try to map the reality out there. The book also includes a foreword by Sir Roger Penrose and an afterword by Dagfinn Follesdal.

Thinking about Godel and Turing

Thinking about Godel and Turing

Author: Gregory J. Chaitin

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789812708977

Category: Computers

Page: 368

View: 338

Dr Gregory Chaitin, one of the world's leading mathematicians, is best known for his discovery of the remarkable O number, a concrete example of irreducible complexity in pure mathematics which shows that mathematics is infinitely complex. In this volume, Chaitin discusses the evolution of these ideas, tracing them back to Leibniz and Borel as well as GAdel and Turing.This book contains 23 non-technical papers by Chaitin, his favorite tutorial and survey papers, including Chaitin's three Scientific American articles. These essays summarize a lifetime effort to use the notion of program-size complexity or algorithmic information content in order to shed further light on the fundamental work of GAdel and Turing on the limits of mathematical methods, both in logic and in computation. Chaitin argues here that his information-theoretic approach to metamathematics suggests a quasi-empirical view of mathematics that emphasizes the similarities rather than the differences between mathematics and physics. He also develops his own brand of digital philosophy, which views the entire universe as a giant computation, and speculates that perhaps everything is discrete software, everything is 0's and 1's.Chaitin's fundamental mathematical work will be of interest to philosophers concerned with the limits of knowledge and to physicists interested in the nature of complexity."

Unpacking Pedagogy

Unpacking Pedagogy

Author: Margaret Walshaw

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 9781607524298

Category: Education

Page: 311

View: 881

This volume represents a serious attempt to understand what it is that structures the pedagogical experience. In that attempt there are two main objectives. One is a theoretical interest that involves examining the issue of the subjectivity of the teacher and exploring how intersubjective negotiations shape the production of classroom practice. A second objective is to apply these understandings to the production of mathematical knowledge and to the construction of identities in actual mathematics classrooms. To that end book contains substantial essays that draw on postmodern philosophies of the social to explore theory's relationship with the practice of mathematics pedagogy. Unpacking Pedagogy takes new ideas seriously and engages readers in theory development. Groundbreaking in content, the book investigates how our thinking about classroom practice in general, and mathematics teaching (and learning), in particular, might be transformed. As a key resource for interrogating and understanding classroom life, the book's sophisticated analyses allow readers to build new knowledge about mathematics pedagogy. In turn, that new knowledge will provide them with the tools to engage more actively in educational criticism and to play a role in educational change.

Mathematics and the Aesthetic

Mathematics and the Aesthetic

Author: Nathalie Sinclair

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387381459

Category: Mathematics

Page: 288

View: 130

This collection of essays explores the ancient affinity between the mathematical and the aesthetic, focusing on fundamental connections between these two modes of reasoning and communicating. From historical, philosophical and psychological perspectives, with particular attention to certain mathematical areas such as geometry and analysis, the authors examine ways in which the aesthetic is ever-present in mathematical thinking and contributes to the growth and value of mathematical knowledge.

Mathematics as Metaphor

Mathematics as Metaphor

Author: I͡U. I. Manin

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN: 9780821843314

Category: Mathematics

Page: 258

View: 859

Includes essays that are grouped in three parts: Mathematics; Mathematics and Physics; and, Language, Consciousness, and Book reviews. This book is suitable for those interested in the philosophy and history of mathematics, physics, and linguistics.

PlaneTalk Collected Writings 2013-2014

PlaneTalk Collected Writings 2013-2014

Author: Donald J. DeGracia

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781312667426

Category: Science

Page: 109

View: 275

Fair warning is given to the materialists and physicalists who think we are nothing more than our brain and body. DeGracia throws down the gauntlet and offers substantial challenges to such shallow and naive views in this provocative set of essays. This collection consists of PlaneTalk blogs from 2013 and 2014, covering a variety of topics about this and the other worlds. The Möbius geometry that lets us move amongst the planes is discussed, as are the ten types of samadhi described by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras. Read about Wilder Penfield the dualist neurosurgeon, and what he says about where consciousness begins and ends in the brain. A Toy Model of Epistemology is developed based on Chaitin's ideas in algorithmic information theory. Leibniz' monads and Richard Feynman's philosophies are discussed, and so much more. There's bound to be something here for everyone interested in the links between our physical and nonphysical existence.