Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Author: George Nafziger

Publisher: Presidio Press

ISBN: 9780307538819

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 488

“An impressive source book on the conflict, high on information and data.”—Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research September 7, 1812, is by itself one of the most cataclysmic days in the history of war: 74,000 casualties at the Battle of Borodino. And this was well before the invention of weaspons of mass destruction like machine guns or breech-loading rifles. In this detailed study of one of the most fascinating military campaigns in history, George Nazfiger includes a clear exposition on the power structure in Europe at the time leading up to Napoleon’s fateful decision to attempt what turned out to be impossible: the conquest of Russia. Also featured are complete orders of battle and detailed descriptions of the opposing forces.

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia, 1812

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia, 1812

Author: Евгений Викторович Тарле

Publisher: Buccaneer Books

ISBN: UOM:49015000245903

Category: Napoleonic Wars, 1800-1815

Page: 422

View: 300

Provides information about the Russian military campaign that began in 1812 and was led by Napoleon I or Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), the emperor of the French, compiled by the Russian National Tourist Office. Notes that the campaign failed due to Napoleon's stretched supply lines and the Russian winter.

Napoleon's invasion of Russia [Illustrated Edition]

Napoleon's invasion of Russia [Illustrated Edition]

Author: Hereford B. George

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781782890065

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 223

Napoleon’s invasion of Russia remains the benchmark for military disaster, even some two hundred year after he and his 600,000 men crossed the Niemen into the interior of Russia. The story of these men and their stolid, valiant opponents, the Russians, is recounted in admirable detail by the Author: from the killing fields of Smolensk and Borodino to the great fire of Moscow and the retreat through the snows of the Russian winter. Illustrated with 8 plans, the action of the great struggle is brought into full life, even through the passage of so much time. Author — George, Hereford B. 1838-1910. Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, T.F. Unwin, 1899. Original Page Count – xv, 451 p. Illustrations — 8 maps and plans.

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1508544484

Category: History

Page: 60

View: 380

*Includes pictures*Includes accounts of the campaign written by French soldiers*Includes a bibliography for further reading*Includes a table of contents“The thunderstorms of the 24th turned into other downpours, turning the tracks——some diarists claim there were no roads in Lithuania——into bottomless mires. Wagon sank up to their hubs; horses dropped from exhaustion; men lost their boots. Stalled wagons became obstacles that forced men around them and stopped supply wagons and artillery columns. Then came the sun which would bake the deep ruts into canyons of concrete, where horses would break their legs and wagons their wheels.” - Richard K. RiehnFrench emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was not a man made for peacetime. By 1812, he had succeeded in subduing most of his enemies – though in Spain, the British continued to be a perpetual thorn in his flank that drained the Empire of money and troops – but his relationship with Russia, never more than one of mutual suspicion at best, had now grown downright hostile. At the heart of it, aside from the obvious mistrust that two huge superpowers intent on dividing up Europe felt for one another, was Napoleon's Continental blockade. Russia had initially agreed to uphold the blockade in the Treaty of Tilsit, but they had since taken to ignoring it altogether. Napoleon wanted an excuse to teach Russia a lesson, and in early 1812 his spies gave him just that: a preliminary plan for the invasion and annexation of Poland, then under French control.Napoleon wasted no time attempting to defuse the situation. He increased his Grande Armee to 450,000 fighting men and prepared it for invasion. On July 23rd, 1812, he launched his army across the border, despite the protestations of many of his Marshals. The Russian Campaign had begun, and it would turn out to be Napoleon's biggest blunder. Russia's great strategic depth already had a habit of swallowing armies, a fact many would-be conquerors learned the hard way. Napoleon, exceptional though he was in so many regards, proved that even military genius can do little in the face of the Russian winter and the resilience of its people. From a purely military standpoint, much of the campaign seemed to be going in Napoleon's favor since he met with little opposition as he pushed forwards into the interior with his customary lightning speed, but gradually this lack of engagements became a hindrance more than a help; Napoleon needed to bring the Russians to battle if he was to defeat them. Moreover, the deeper Napoleon got his army sucked into Russia, the more vulnerable their lines of supply, now stretched almost to breaking point, became. The Grande Armee required a prodigious amount of material in order to keep from breaking down, but the army's pace risked outstripping its baggage train, which was constantly being raided by Cossack marauders. Moreover, Napoleon's customary practice of subsisting partially off the land was proving to be ineffective: the Russians were putting everything along his line of advance, including whole cities, to the torch rather than offer him even a stick of kindling or sack of flour for his army. Napoleon was sure that taking Moscow would prompt the Russians to surrender. Instead, with winter on the way, the Russians appeared more bellicose than ever. Napoleon and his army lingered for several weeks in the burnt shell of Moscow but then, bereft of supplies and facing the very real threat of utter annihilation, Napoleon gave the order to retreat. By the time the Grande Armee had reached the Berezina, it had been decimated: of the over 450,000 fighting men that had invaded Russia that autumn, less than 40,000 remained. Napoleon's Invasion of Russia details the background leading up to the campaign, the fighting, and the aftermath of France's catastrophic defeat. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the French invasion of Russia like never before.

Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia, 1812

Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia, 1812

Author: Eugene Tarlé

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781789122497

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 950

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) is one of the most illustrated political and military figures of the last two millennia. He has remained in the memory of the world as a legend that the passage of the years has failed to blur. On the contrary, Napoleon Bonaparte widely continues to be considered the personification of human genius. Originally published in this English translation in 1942, leading Russian historian Evgeny Tarle details Napoleon’s military campaign to invade Russia in the early nineteenth century. “The campaign of 1812 was more frankly imperialistic than any other of Napoleon’s wars; it was more directly dictated by the interests of the French upper middle class. The war of 1796-7, the conquest of Egypt in 1798-9, the second Italian campaign, and the recent defeat of the Austrians could still be justified as necessary measures of defence against the interventionists. The Napoleonic press called the Austerlitz campaign ‘self-defence’ against Russia, Austria, and England. The average Frenchman considered even the subjugation of Prussia in 1806-7 no more than a just penalty inflicted on the Prussian court for the arrogant ultimatum sent by Frederick-William III to the ‘peace-loving’ Napoleon, constantly harried by troublesome neighbours. Napoleon never ceased to speak of the fourth conquest of Austria in 1809 as a ‘defensive’ war, provoked by Austrian threats. Only the invasion of Spain and Portugal was passed over in discreet silence. “The War of 1812 was a struggle for survival in the full sense of the word—a defensive struggle against the onslaughts of the imperialist vulture.”—E. V. Tarle

The French Invasion of Russia and the Battle of Leipzig

The French Invasion of Russia and the Battle of Leipzig

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1985198835

Category:

Page: 174

View: 310

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting written by soldiers and generals *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was not a man made for peacetime. By 1812, he had succeeded in subduing most of his enemies - though in Spain, the British continued to be a perpetual thorn in his flank that drained the Empire of money and troops - but his relationship with Russia, never more than one of mutual suspicion at best, had now grown downright hostile. At the heart of it, aside from the obvious mistrust that two huge superpowers intent on dividing up Europe felt for one another, was Napoleon's Continental blockade. Russia had initially agreed to uphold the blockade in the Treaty of Tilsit, but they had since taken to ignoring it altogether. Napoleon wanted an excuse to teach Russia a lesson, and in early 1812 his spies gave him just that: a preliminary plan for the invasion and annexation of Poland, then under French control. Napoleon wasted no time attempting to defuse the situation. He increased his Grande Armee to 450,000 fighting men and prepared it for invasion. On July 23rd, 1812, he launched his army across the border, despite the protestations of many of his Marshals. The Russian Campaign had begun, and it would turn out to be Napoleon's biggest blunder. Russia's great strategic depth already had a habit of swallowing armies, a fact many would-be conquerors learned the hard way. Napoleon, exceptional though he was in so many regards, proved that even military genius can do little in the face of the Russian winter and the resilience of its people. Napoleon's Russian adventure gutted his veteran army, depriving him of the majority of his finest and most loyal soldiers. Those who remained formed the hard core of his new armies, but the Russian fiasco damaged their health and embittered their previously unquestioning loyalty. Napoleon raised vast new armies, but circumstances compelled him to fill the ranks with raw recruits, whose fighting skills did not equal their undoubted bravery and whose dedication to the Napoleonic cause was shaky, and in many cases due solely to coercion. The tough, experienced, faithful veteran found himself outnumbered by unwilling, sketchily trained amateurs. These factors set the stage for the second setback, which essentially sealed the fate of Napoleon's empire. The four-day Battle of Leipzig in October 1813, romantically but accurately dubbed the "Battle of the Nations," proved the decisive encounter of the War of the Sixth Coalition and essentially determined the course the Napoleonic Wars took from that moment forward. All the belligerents showed awareness that the European conflict's climax was at hand: "There was keen determination in Prussia to exact revenge for the humiliation visited by Napoleon, but enthusiasm for armed struggle that would bring the eviction of the French found enthusiastic response throughout the German states. [...] To minimize his army's exposure and purchase time to rebuild, Napoleon might have stood on the defensive, but he followed his standard strategy of deciding the campaign with a bold advance to achieve decisive victory in one stroke." (Tucker, 2011, 302). The resultant collision was the single largest field action of the Napoleonic Wars, dwarfing Waterloo in size, complexity, and overall importance. The Battle of Leipzig was probably the combat which involved the highest concentration of men on a single extended battlefield on the planet up to that point in history, and would not be exceeded until the vast struggles of the First World War almost precisely a century later. The French Invasion of Russia and the Battle of Leipzig details the background leading up to the campaign, the fighting, and the aftermath of France's catastrophic defeat. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Leipzig like never before.

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Author: Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Publisher: Ravenio Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 487

A great historian examines Napoleon's failed invasion of Russia in 1812. This classic includes the following chapters: I. The Invasion of Russia (1811 to June, 1812) II. Smolensk and Valutino (August, 1812) III. Borodino (September 1-7, 1812) IV. Moscow (Sep 8 to Oct 19, 1812) V. Maloyaroslavez (Oct 19 to Nov 14, 1812) VI. The Beresina (Nov 15, 1812, to Jan 31, 1813)

Napoleon's Russian Campaign of 1812

Napoleon's Russian Campaign of 1812

Author: Edward Foord

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4066338118578

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 489

Napoleon's Russian Campaign of 1812 is a historical account of the French invasion of Russia which was undertaken by Napoleon to force Russia back into the Continental blockade of the United Kingdom. On 24 June 1812 and the following days, the first wave of the multinational Grande Armée crossed the border into Russia with somewhere around 600,000 soldiers, the opposing Russian field forces amounted to around 180,000–200,000 at this time. Through a series of long forced marches, Napoleon pushed his army rapidly through Western Russia in a futile attempt to destroy the retreating Russian Army of Michael Andreas Barclay de Tolly, winning just the Battle of Smolensk in August. Under its new Commander in Chief Mikhail Kutuzov, the Russian Army continued to retreat employing attrition warfare against Napoleon forcing the invaders to rely on a supply system that was incapable of feeding their large army in the field. The fierce Battle of Borodino, seventy miles west of Moscow, was a narrow French victory that resulted in a Russian general withdrawal to the south of Moscow near Kaluga. On 14 September, Napoleon and his army of about 100,000 men occupied Moscow, only to find it abandoned, and the city was soon ablaze. Napoleon stayed in Moscow for 5 weeks, waiting for a peace offer that never came. Lack of food for the men and fodder for the horses, hypothermia from the bitter cold and guerilla warfare from Russian peasants and Cossacks led to great losses. Three days after the Battle of Berezina, only around 10,000 soldiers of the main army remained. On 5 December, Napoleon left the army and returned to Paris.

1812--Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

1812--Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Author: Paul Britten Austin

Publisher: Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal

ISBN: 185367415X

Category: History

Page: 1188

View: 913

This volume brings together Austin's atmospheric trilogy on Napoleon's Russian campaign, allowing the reader to trace the course of Napoleon's doomed soldiers from the crossing of the Niemen in 1812 to the finale in the depths of a Russian winter.