Peterborough in the Great War

Peterborough in the Great War

Author: Abigail Hamilton-Thompson

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473860148

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 432

When news of the war first broke out in 1914, the citizens of Peterborough could not have been prepared for the changes that would occur over the next four years. This book takes a detailed looks at Peterborough's involvement in the Great war from when it commenced in July 1914, to the Armistice in November 1918, covering in great detail its affect on the city and the every day lives of its people. For example, the factory Werner Pfeiderer & Perkins at Westwood Works was forced to change its name to Perkins Engineers due to the anti-German feeling at the outbreak of the war.One in six of Peterborough's working age men did not return from the front line, and in one single day forty-six men from the city lost their lives. Many of these men came from Peterborough's factories. As a result, these factories looked to women to produce armaments and tanks, as well as repairing guns used in the trenches.Edith Cavell, the famous British nurse, grew up in Peterborough and was shot dead in 1915 for assisting the escape of Allied soldiers from Belgium. Peterborough in the Great War is a poignant testimony not only to her bravery, but that of the city's people and their momentous efforts.

Grandad's Army

Grandad's Army

Author: Mike Osborne

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 185

In August 1914, on the outbreak of the First World War, there was enormous pressure on men to enlist in Kitchener's New Armies, supplementing the tiny regular army and Territorial Force. This pressure was intense, and posters, the entreaties of local worthies, and an apparently indiscriminate scattering of white feathers, all exacerbated masculine sensitivity. We are all familiar, if only through BBC TV's 'Dad's Army', with the Home Guard of the Second World War. Far less is known of their First World War equivalent: the Volunteer Training Corps (VTC). Like their counter-parts in WW2, the VTC comprised those who were too old, too young, too unfit or too indispensable to serve in the regular forces. They fought for the right to be armed, uniformed and trained; to be employed on meaningful duties; and at first, to exist at all. This book explores the origins, development and structure of the VTC, along with those who belonged to the many supporting medical, transport, police and youth organisations who kept the home fires burning or, in some cases, tried to put them out. The VTC arose from the need of those men who were forced to stay at home to be seen to be doing their bit. They saw the removal of the bulk of both the regular army and the Territorial Force to the Western Front as their opportunity to prepare to resist the expected German invasion of Britain, and as a way of countering accusations of shirking, or even cowardice.

Remembered in Bronze and Stone

Remembered in Bronze and Stone

Author: Alan MacLeod

Publisher: Heritage House Publishing Co

ISBN: 9781772031539

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 612

Remembered in Broze and Stone evokes the years immediately following the First World War, when grief was still freshly felt in communities from one end of Canada to the other. This book tells the story of the nation’s war memorials—particularly bronze or stone sculptures depicting Canadian soldiers—through the artists who conceived them, the communities that built them, and, above all, those who died in the war and were immortalized in these stunning sculptures raised in their honour. A century has passed since Canadians were scarred by the loss of more than sixty thousand sons and daughters, who now lie in faraway battlefield graves. Highlighting more than 130 monuments from coast to coast, Remembered in Bronze and Stone revives a pivotal period in history that changed Canada forever.

Set in Stone?

Set in Stone?

Author: Emma Login

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781784912581

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 508

This book provides a holistic and longitudinal study of war memorialisation in the UK, France and the USA from 1860 to 2014.

The Canadian Experience of the Great War

The Canadian Experience of the Great War

Author: Brian Douglas Tennyson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780810886797

Category: History

Page: 594

View: 986

Although the United States itself did not enter the war until April 1917, Canada enlisted the moment Great Britain engaged in the conflict in August of 1914. The Canadian contribution was great, as over 600,000 men and women came to serve in the war effort. Over 150,000 were wounded while near 67,000 gave their lives. The literature it generated, and continues to generate so many years later, is enormous and addresses all of its aspects. The Canadian Experience of the Great War: A Guide to Memoirs is the first attempt to identify all of the published accounts by Canadian veterans of their Great War experiences.

Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Author: Thierry Terret

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135760885

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 312

View: 434

The Great War has been largely ignored by historians of sport. However sport was an integral part of cultural conditioning into both physiological and psychological military efficiency in the decades leading up to it. It is time to acknowledge that the Great War also had an influence on sport in post-war European culture. Both are neglected topics. Sport, Militarism and the Great War deals with four significant aspects of the relationship between sport and war before, during and immediately after the 1914-1918 conflict. First, it explores the creation and consolidation of the cult of martial heroism and chivalric self-sacrifice in the pre-war era. Second, it examines the consequences of the mingling of soldiers from various nations on later sport. Third, it considers the role of the Great War in the transformation of the leisure of the masses. Finally, it examines the links between war, sport and male socialisation. The Great War contributed to a redefinition of European masculinity in the post-war period. The part sport played in this redefinition receives attention. Sport, Militarism and the Great War is in two parts: the Continental (Part I) and the "Anglo-Saxon" (Part II). No study has adopted this bilateral approach to date. Thus, in conception and execution, it is original. With its originality of content and the approaching centenary of the advent of the Great War in 2014, it is anticipated that the book will capture a wide audience. This book was originally published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport.

The Boy Scouts in the Great War

The Boy Scouts in the Great War

Author: Craig Armstrong

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526723277

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 723

The Boy Scouts Association was just seven years old when war broke out in 1914. With its members brought up with a strong ethos of duty and loyalty, it was no surprise that many wanted to play the best role possible in the nation’s war effort. Many members were amongst those who rallied to the colors and enlisted in the heady days of the first weeks and months of the war. Some already belonged to either the Reserves or the Territorials and so found themselves immediately thrust into the front lines and casualty rates were high. Several of those who fought were decorated for their service, with a number even wining the Victoria Cross. On the Home Front, Boy Scouts served as messengers, printers, dispatch riders etc. in the War Office and other government offices, both locally and nationally. Scouts helped gather in the harvest, hunted for spies, aided the civil and military authorities, maintained watch during air raids, helped various wartime charities and sold old bottles to raise funds for recreational huts and ambulances for the front. Others found themselves mounting guard on the coasts and on vulnerable points such as the railway network, or aiding recruitment efforts across the country. The Boy Scout became a trusted and common sight on the streets of the country and the contribution they made was great indeed.

Roll of Honour

Roll of Honour

Author: Barry Blades

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473873896

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 561

The Great War was the first 'Total War'; a war in which human and material resources were pitched into a life-and-death struggle on a colossal scale. British citizens fought on both the Battle Fronts and on the Home Front, on the killing fields of France and Flanders as well as in the industrial workshops of 'Blighty'. Men, women and children all played their part in an unprecedented mobilisation of a nation at war. Unlike much of the traditional literature on the Great War, with its understandable fascination with the terrible experiences of 'Tommy in the Trenches', Roll of Honour shifts our gaze. It focuses on how the Great War was experienced by other key participants, namely those communities involved in 'schooling' the nation's children. It emphasises the need to examine the 'myriad faces of war', rather than traditional stereotypes, if we are to gain a deeper understanding of personal agency and decision making in times of conflict and upheaval. The dramatis personae in Roll of Honour include Head Teachers and Governors charged by the Government with mobilising their 'troops'; school masters, whose enlistment, conscription or conscientious objection to military service changed lives and career paths; the 'temporary' school mistresses who sought to demonstrate their 'interchangeability' in male dominated institutions; the school alumni who thought of school whilst knee-deep in mud; and finally, of course, the school children themselves, whose 'campaigns' added vital resources to the war economy. These 'myriad faces' existed in all types of British school, from the elite Public Schools to the elementary schools designed for the country's poorest waifs and strays. This powerful account of the Great War will be of interest to general readers as well as historians of military campaigns, education and British society.

Reported Missing in the Great War

Reported Missing in the Great War

Author: John Broom

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526749543

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 703

Of the one million British and Empire military personnel who were killed in action; died of wounds, disease, or injury; or were missing presumed dead during the First World War, over half a million have no known grave. Of these, nearly 188,000 are buried anonymously in Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries, with a stone bearing the epitaph ‘Known Unto God.' The remains of a further 339,000 lie scattered across the wartime battlefields, having been buried in marked graves that were subsequently obliterated as front lines moved backwards and forwards, or destroyed forever in the carnage mechanized warfare wrought upon the human body. For the families of those who were reported missing, months of agonizing uncertainty could await, as searches were made to establish the precise fate of their loved ones. Sometimes rumors that an individual was recovering from wounds in a hospital, unable to contact his family, or had been taken prisoner by the enemy could circulate, causing a toxic admixture of hope, tinged with anxiety then dashed by the despair of the confirmation of death. This book traces the history of the searching services that were established to assist families in eliciting definitive news of their missing loved ones. Then, using previously unpublished material, most of it lovingly preserved in family archives for over a century, the lives of eight soldiers, whose families had no known resting place to visit after the conclusion of the war, are recounted. These young men, their lives full of promise, vanished from the face of the earth. The circumstances of their deaths and the painstaking efforts undertaken, both by family members and public and voluntary organizations, to piece together what information could be found are described. The eventual acceptance of the reality of death and the need to properly commemorate the lives of those who would have no marked grave are examined. For three of the eight men, recent discoveries have meant that over a century since they were given up as missing, their remains have been identified and allowed families some degree of closure.

Nurse Writers of the Great War

Nurse Writers of the Great War

Author: Christine Hallett

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781784996321

Category: Medical

Page: 296

View: 879

This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. The First World War was the first ‘total war’. Its industrial weaponry damaged millions of men and drove whole armies underground into dangerously unhealthy trenches. Many were killed. Many more suffered terrible, life-threatening injuries: wound infections such as gas gangrene and tetanus, exposure to extremes of temperature, emotional trauma and systemic disease. In an effort to alleviate this suffering, tens of thousands of women volunteered to serve as nurses. Of these, some were experienced professionals, while others had undergone only minimal training. But regardless of their preparation, they would all gain a unique understanding of the conditions of industrial warfare. Until recently their contributions, both to the saving of lives and to our understanding of warfare, have remained largely hidden from view. By combining biographical research with textual analysis, Nurse writers of the great war opens a window onto their insights into the nature of nursing and the impact of warfare.

Vimy

Vimy

Author: Tim Cook

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780735233171

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 525

#1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER Winner of the 2018 JW Dafoe Book Prize Longlisted for British Columbia's National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction 2018 Runner-up for the 2018 Templer Medal Book Prize Finalist for the 2018 Ottawa Book Awards A bold new telling of the defining battle of the Great War, and how it came to signify and solidify Canada’s national identity Why does Vimy matter? How did a four-day battle at the midpoint of the Great War, a clash that had little strategic impact on the larger Allied war effort, become elevated to a national symbol of Canadian identity? Tim Cook, Canada’s foremost military historian and a Charles Taylor Prize winner, examines the Battle of Vimy Ridge and the way the memory of it has evolved over 100 years. The operation that began April 9, 1917, was the first time the four divisions of the Canadian Corps fought together. More than 10,000 Canadian soldiers were killed or injured over four days—twice the casualty rate of the Dieppe Raid in August 1942. The Corps’ victory solidified its reputation among allies and opponents as an elite fighting force. In the wars’ aftermath, Vimy was chosen as the site for the country’s strikingly beautiful monument to mark Canadian sacrifice and service. Over time, the legend of Vimy took on new meaning, with some calling it the “birth of the nation.” The remarkable story of Vimy is a layered skein of facts, myths, wishful thinking, and conflicting narratives. Award-winning writer Tim Cook explores why the battle continues to resonate with Canadians a century later. He has uncovered fresh material and photographs from official archives and private collections across Canada and from around the world. On the 100th anniversary of the event, and as Canada celebrates 150 years as a country, Vimy is a fitting tribute to those who fought the country’s defining battle. It is also a stirring account of Canadian identity and memory, told by a masterful storyteller.