Pinocchio's Progeny

Pinocchio's Progeny

Author: Harold B. Segel

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801852625

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 372

View: 323

While Carlo Collodi's internationally revered Pinocchio may not have been the single source of the modernist fascination with puppets and marionettes, the book's appearance on the threshold of the modernist movement heralded a new artistic interest in the making of human likenesses. And the puppets, marionettes, and other forms that figure so vividly and provocatively in modernist and avant-garde drama can, according to Harold Segel, be regarded as Pinocchio's progeny. Segel argues that the philosophical, social, and artistic proclivities of the modernist movement converged in the discovery of an exciting new relevance in the puppet and marionette. Previously viewed as entertainment for children and fairground audiences, puppets emerged as an integral component of the modernist vision. They became metaphors for human helplessness in the face of powerful forces -- from Eros and the supernatural to history, industrial society, and national myth. Dramatists used them to satirize the tyranny of bourgeois custom and convention, to deflate the arrogance of the powerful, and to breathe new life into a theater that had become tradition-bound and commercialized. Pinocchio's Progeny offers a broad overview of the uses of these figures in European drama from 1890 to 1935. It considers developments in France, Spain, Italy, Austria, Germany, Sweden, Russia, Poland and Czechoslovakia. In his introduction, Segel reviews the premodernist literary and dramatic treatment of the puppet and marionette from Cervantes' Don Quixote to the turn-of-the- century European cabaret. His epilogue considers the appearance of puppets and marionettes in postmodern European and American drama by examining worksby such dramatists as Jean-Claude Van Itallie, Heiner MA1/4ller, and Tadeusz Kantor.

Constructing the Viennese Modern Body

Constructing the Viennese Modern Body

Author: Nathan J. Timpano

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781315413686

Category: Art

Page: 222

View: 924

This book takes a new, interdisciplinary approach to analyzing modern Viennese visual culture, one informed by Austro-German theater, contemporary medical treatises centered on hysteria, and an original examination of dramatic gestures in expressionist artworks. It centers on the following question: How and to what end was the human body discussed, portrayed, and utilized as an aesthetic metaphor in turn-of-the-century Vienna? By scrutinizing theatrically “hysterical” performances, avant-garde puppet plays, and images created by Oskar Kokoschka, Koloman Moser, Egon Schiele and others, Nathan J. Timpano discusses how Viennese artists favored the pathological or puppet-like body as their contribution to European modernism.

Little Machinery

Little Machinery

Author: Mary Liddell

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814332668

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 120

View: 511

An updated edition that situates a landmark 1920s children's picture book in its historical and social context.

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Pinocchio, Puppets, and Modernity

Author: Katia Pizzi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136620492

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 430

This study assesses the significance of Pinocchio in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in addition to his status as the creature of a nineteenth century traversed by a cultural enthusiasm for dummies, puppets, and marionettes. This collection identifies him as a figure characterized by a 'fluid identity,' informed with transition, difference, joie de vivre, otherness, displacement, and metamorphosis, making Pinocchio a truly modern, indeed postmodern and posthuman, cultural icon. Pinocchio, Puppets and Modernity explores this crucial and as yet little visited field, reassessing Pinocchio's genealogy and progeny, as well as illuminating both the wider context and more specific cultural manifestations of the mechanical-human interface in the domains of theatre, the fine arts, literature, radio, and even virtual reality coherently with the digital metamorphosis of our times. The wide-ranging scope of this exploration encompasses Italian, French, and English literature, dummies and marionettes in modernist and contemporary theatre, the fairytale tradition, and traditional and contemporary painting, as well as the older and newer media of radio, television, cinema, and the Internet. The diverse, comparative, and multimedia focus of this original discussion testifies to the enduring transcultural legacy of Pinocchio. Eminently sellable as a traditional cultural icon, Pinocchio is equally impactful and relevant for a globalized, multicultural, and virtual society, from Collodi to Disney and beyond. Katia Pizzi is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. She has published volumes on cultural identities, including A City in Search of an Author (2001) and The Cultural Identities of European Cities (2010), and on children's literature and illustration.

The Pinocchio Effect

The Pinocchio Effect

Author: Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226774480

Category: History

Page: 449

View: 677

'The Pinocchio Effect' draws on a broad array of sources to trace the making of a modern national identity in Italy. The author explores all the ways that identity was constructed through newly formed attachments, voluntary and otherwise, to the nation.

Tonino

Tonino

Author: John G. Stoffolano Jr.

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781450299282

Category: Fiction

Page: 460

View: 773

Tonino is a young, curious cricket boy, living with his family in Boston. Life is good for young Tonino, but he suspects there’s more to the world than his own backyard. He wants to learn about foreign cultures, but mostly he wants to learn about his own family roots. He heads to Italy, where he is surprised to meet the famous Blue Fairy, who was friends with Tonino’s ancestor—the cricket guide to Pinocchio. Whereas Tonino’s ancestor was put in charge of young Pinocchio’s conscience, Tonino is given a much more universal conscience. He is charged with the conscience of the world and the well-being of its environment, a big change to his personal journey. No longer is he looking after the story of his family; now he looks after the story of Mother Earth! Suddenly, he is transported on a worldwide adventure ... He heads to Puerto Rico and meets the Ta?no people. He visits a monarch in Mexico and cricket warriors in China. In the American Southwest, he learns about the spirit of the cricket “katsina”; in Hawaii, he encounters Pele’s rage. It’s a lot to take in for the young cricket boy, but ultimately he discovers that seeking his roots is only the beginning in the wide world of biodiversity, cultural diversity, and conservation of both. The boy/cricket is baptized Anthony at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. His parents live in the North End where his mother kept hearing the television advertisement “Anthony, Anthony, It’s Prince Spaghetti Day” so they named him Anthony. “Naming him Anthony was straight forward, but naming him Tonino was at the brilliant suggestion of Dr. William Cooley, retired Northampton Ophthalmologist and avid italophile. Dr. Cooley sent Dr. Stoffolano a short novel by an Italian author named Rodari about a young boy, Tonino, who tries to become invisible so that he could avoid problems with his teacher. Rodari (1920–1980) was one of Italy’s best-known writers of children’s books and the recipient of the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for children’s literature.” Thus, the name and his ability to become invisible are incorporated into the story. In addition to this reference to his nickname, Tonino is a small cricket because he always ate Italian food in the North End and not cricket food. Thus, he also got the name Tonino, which means little Anthony in Italian from Joe Pace who owns and started Joe Pace & Sons Italian Specialities in Boston’s North End. In his novel, Stoffolano establishes the first lineage for this famous cricket family. Tonino’s great, great, great grandfather was Grillo parlante, the talking cricket in the original story Pinocchio. Grillo was also the conscience of Pinocchio and Grillo’s great grandson was the famous Jiminy Cricket in Walt Disney’s classic movie Pinocchio. In this wonderful story about Tonino, the reader sees many different regions of the world through the eyes of this boy/cricket where, through the experiences of Tonino, the reader will learn more about how crickets played various and important roles in different indigenous cultures. Tonino’s charge by the Blue Fairy was to become the conscience of the world when it comes to environmental issues: A heavy responsibility or a small boy/cricket. The importance of cultural diversity, just as important as biodiversity, is stressed and Tonino takes on Dr. E. O. Wilson, one of the greatest thinkers/writers of our generation, as his mentor.

The Secret Life of Puppets

The Secret Life of Puppets

Author: Victoria Nelson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674041417

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 152

In one of those rare books that allows us to see the world not as we've never seen it before, but as we see it daily without knowing, Victoria Nelson illuminates the deep but hidden attraction the supernatural still holds for a secular mainstream culture that forced the transcendental underground and firmly displaced wonder and awe with the forces of reason, materialism, and science. In a backward look at an era now drawing to a close, The Secret Life of Puppets describes a curious reversal in the roles of art and religion: where art and literature once took their content from religion, we came increasingly to seek religion, covertly, through art and entertainment. In a tour of Western culture that is at once exhilarating and alarming, Nelson shows us the distorted forms in which the spiritual resurfaced in high art but also, strikingly, in the mass culture of puppets, horror-fantasy literature, and cyborgs: from the works of Kleist, Poe, Musil, and Lovecraft to Philip K. Dick and virtual reality simulations. At the end of the millennium, discarding a convention of the demonized grotesque that endured three hundred years, a Demiurgic consciousness shaped in Late Antiquity is emerging anew to re-divinize the human as artists like Lars von Trier and Will Self reinvent Expressionism in forms familiar to our pre-Reformation ancestors. Here as never before, we see how pervasively but unwittingly, consuming art forms of the fantastic, we allow ourselves to believe.

Persons and Things

Persons and Things

Author: Barbara E. Johnson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674026381

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 257

View: 104

Moving effortlessly between symbolist poetry and Barbie dolls, artificial intelligence and Kleist, Kant, and Winnicott, Barbara Johnson not only clarifies psychological and social dynamics; she also re-dramatizes the work of important tropes—without ever losing sight of the ethical imperative with which she begins: the need to treat persons as persons. In Persons and Things, Johnson turns deconstruction around to make a fundamental contribution to the new aesthetics. She begins with the most elementary thing we know: deconstruction calls attention to gaps and reveals that their claims upon us are fraudulent. Johnson revolutionizes the method by showing that the inanimate thing exposed as a delusion is central to fantasy life, that fantasy life, however deluded, should be taken seriously, and that although a work of art “is formed around something missing,” this “void is its vanishing point, not its essence.” She shows deftly and delicately that the void inside Keats’s urn, Heidegger’s jug, or Wallace Stevens’s jar forms the center around which we tend to organize our worlds. The new aesthetics should restore fluidities between persons and things. In pursuing it, Johnson calls upon Ovid, Keats, Poe, Plath, and others who have inhabited this in-between space. The entire process operates via a subtlety that only a critic of Johnson’s caliber could reveal to us.

Acts

Acts

Author: Tzachi Zamir

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472052134

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 278

View: 283

The first philosophical study devoted solely to acting, offering a meditation on the spillover from acting to life

Understanding Disney

Understanding Disney

Author: Janet Wasko

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780745669045

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 187

Since the 1930s the Walt Disney Company has produced characters, images, and stories which have captivated audiences around the world. How can we understand the appeal of Disney products? What is it about the Disney phenomenon that attracts so many children as well as adults? In this major new book, Janet Wasko examines the processes by which the Disney company - one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world - manufactures the fantasies which enthrall millions. She analyses the historical expansion of the Disney empire, examines the content of Disney's classic films, cartoons and TV programs and shows how they are produced, considering how some of the same techniques have been applied to the Disney theme parks. She also discusses the reception of Disney products by different kinds of audiences. By looking at the Disney phenomenon from a variety of perspectives, she provides a fresh and comprehensive account of one of the most significant media and cultural institutions of our time. This important book by a leading scholar of the entertainment industries will be of great interest to students in media and cultural studies and will appeal to a wide readership.

Children's Literature and the Posthuman

Children's Literature and the Posthuman

Author: Zoe Jaques

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136674914

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 406

An investigation of identity formation in children's literature, this book brings together children’s literature and recent critical concerns with posthuman identity to argue that children’s fiction offers sophisticated interventions into debates about what it means to be human, and in particular about humanity’s relationship to animals and the natural world. In complicating questions of human identity, ecology, gender, and technology, Jaques engages with a multifaceted posthumanism to understand how philosophy can emerge from children's fantasy, disclosing how such fantasy can build upon earlier traditions to represent complex issues of humanness to younger audiences. Interrogating the place of the human through the non-human (whether animal or mechanical) leads this book to have interpretations that radically depart from the critical tradition, which, in its concerns with the socialization and representation of the child, has ignored larger epistemologies of humanness. The book considers canonical texts of children's literature alongside recent bestsellers and films, locating texts such as Gulliver’s Travels (1726), Pinocchio (1883) and the Alice books (1865, 1871) as important works in the evolution of posthuman ideas. This study provides radical new readings of children’s literature and demonstrates that the genre offers sophisticated interventions into the nature, boundaries and dominion of humanity.

Women and Puppetry

Women and Puppetry

Author: Alissa Mello

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351848794

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 222

View: 635

Women and Puppetry is the first publication dedicated to the study of women in the field of puppetry arts. It includes critical articles and personal accounts that interrogate specific historical moments, cultural contexts, and notions of "woman" on and off stage. Part I, "Critical Perspective," includes historical and contemporary analyses of women’s roles in society, gender anxiety revealed through the unmarked puppet body, and sexual expression within oppressive social contexts. Part II, "Local Contexts: Challenges and Transformations," investigates work of female practitioners within specific cultural contexts to illuminate how women are intervening in traditionally male spaces. Each chapter in Part II offers brief accounts of specific social histories, barriers, and gender biases that women have faced, and the opportunities afforded female creative leaders to appropriate, revive, and transform performance traditions. And in Part III, "Women Practitioners Speak," contemporary artists reflect on their experiences as female practitioners within the art of puppet theatre. Representing female writers and practitioners from across the globe, Women and Puppetry offers students and scholars a comprehensive interrogation of the challenges and opportunities that women face in this unique art form.