Prehistoric Britain

Prehistoric Britain

Author: Timothy Darvill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136973048

Category: Social Science

Page: 417

View: 729

Britain has been inhabited by humans for over half a million years, during which time there were a great many changes in lifestyles and in the surrounding landscape. This book, now in its second edition, examines the development of human societies in Britain from earliest times to the Roman conquest of AD 43, as revealed by archaeological evidence. Special attention is given to six themes which are traced through prehistory: subsistence, technology, ritual, trade, society, and population. Prehistoric Britain begins by introducing the background to prehistoric studies in Britain, presenting it in terms of the development of interest in the subject and the changes wrought by new techniques such as radiocarbon dating, and new theories, such as the emphasis on social archaeology. The central sections trace the development of society from the hunter-gatherer groups of the last Ice Age, through the adoption of farming, the introduction of metalworking, and on to the rise of highly organized societies living on the fringes of the mighty Roman Empire in the 1st century AD. Throughout, emphasis is given to documenting and explaining changes within these prehistoric communities, and to exploring the regional variations found in Britain. In this way the wealth of evidence that can be seen in the countryside and in our museums is placed firmly in its proper context. It concludes with a review of the effects of prehistoric communities on life today. With over 120 illustrations, this is a unique review of Britain's ancient past as revealed by modern archaeology. The revisions and updates to Prehistoric Britain ensure that this will continue to be the most comprehensive and authoritative account of British prehistory for those students and interested readers studying the subject.

Prehistoric Britain

Prehistoric Britain

Author: Joshua Pollard

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405125468

Category: Social Science

Page: 386

View: 688

Informed by the latest research and in-depth analysis, Prehistoric Britain provides students and scholars alike with a fascinating overview of the development of human societies in Britain from the Upper Paleolithic to the end of the Iron Age. Offers readers an incisive synthesis and much-needed overview of current research themes Includes essays from leading scholars and professionals who address the very latest trends in current research Explores the interpretive debates surrounding major transitions in British prehistory

The Farming of Prehistoric Britain

The Farming of Prehistoric Britain

Author: P. J. Fowler

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 0521273692

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 663

Emphasizing past gains in knowledge from experimental, aerial and field archaeology, Dr Fowler demonstrates how the application of archaeological approaches to agrarian history has made the subject central to our understanding of the prehistoric period. Emphasizing past gains in knowledge from experimental, aerial and field archaeology, Dr Fowler demonstrates how the application of archaeological approaches to agrarian history has made the subject central to our understanding of the prehistoric period.

Prehistoric Britain

Prehistoric Britain

Author: Ann Woodward

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781785705359

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 997

Pottery has become one of the major categories of artefact that is used in reconstructing the lives and habits of prehistoric people. In these 14 papers, members of the Prehistoric Ceramics Research Group discuss the many ways in which pottery is used to study chronology, behavioural changes, inter-relationships between people and between people and their environment, technology and production, exchange, settlement organisation, cultural expression, style and symbolism.

Prehistoric Britain from the Air

Prehistoric Britain from the Air

Author: Timothy Darvill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521551323

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 453

This book provides a bird's-eye look at the monumental achievements of Britain's earliest inhabitants. Britain had been occupied by prehistoric communities for over half a million years before the Roman Conquest. During this time many changes were wrought in the landscape, some of them so indelibly scored that they are still visible today. The unique bird's-eye perspective offered by the aerial camera brings to life many of the familiar sites and monuments that prehistoric communities built, and exposes to view many thousands of sites that simply cannot be seen at ground level because they have become buried or levelled by centuries of ploughing and cultivation. In this book, Timothy Darvill introduces the ways in which aerial photographs reveal traces of the prehistoric past, illustrating and describing a wide selection of archaeological sites and landscapes, and, for the first time, applying social archaeology to the field of aerial photography.

Prehistoric Britain

Prehistoric Britain

Author: Robert Munro

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781465613769

Category: Great Britain

Page:

View: 746

As the word "prehistoric" has no limitation in the past history of the country, it logically follows that a treatise on "Prehistoric Britain" would have an equally wide range; but by a judicious discretion we limit the scope of this book to the period during which man was an inhabitant of Western Europe, prior to the invention of written records. But the Britain of that early period differed widely from the Britain of to-day both in climate and geographical area, and to some extent in its flora and fauna. Consequently our first duty is to describe with as much precision as modern researches will admit of, but very briefly, the physical conditions which obtained in prehistoric Britain when it comes within the above-defined scope of the present work. From this standpoint we have practically to discuss the entire field of the development of human civilization, as disclosed by the remains of Palæolithic and Neolithic races, both of which, have left traces of their existence within the British area. On the other hand, the pre-history of our island, outside the limitation imposed on it by the appearance of man on the scene, goes back to the dawn of life on the globe; and it is largely to the modifications effected under the influence of cosmic agencies during this infinitely longer period that the country became a suitable habitat for Homo sapiens. A few preliminary words on this aspect of the subject will not, therefore, be considered out of place, as thereby the true starting-point of our main thesis will be brought into clearer relief. As we cannot endorse the opinion long held as a dogma in theological cosmogonies, that the multitudinous phenomena of the material world—the distribution of land and water, the evolution of plants and animals, the recurrence of seasons, etc.—were specially designed to minister to the welfare of man- kind, we are bound to account for them on some other hypothesis. On this point all we affirm is that they were the outcome of the fixed laws which then governed, and still govern, the universe. Evidence in support of this conclusion is not far to seek. In the Geological and Palæontological records we have ample details of the successive changes the earth has undergone since it cooled down sufficiently to admit of organic life on its surface.

Food and Farming in Prehistoric Britain

Food and Farming in Prehistoric Britain

Author: Paul Elliott

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 176

View: 976

From spit roasting pig to hanging cream cheese from the rafters, from baking roast pork under the ground in pits to cooking trout on wicker frames over an open fire, cooking techniques in prehistoric Britain are ingenious and revealing. There were no ovens and many vegetables and breeds of animal familiar to us today had not yet arrived. In reconstructing some of these techniques and recipes, the author has discovered a different world, with a completely different approach to food. This is native cuisine, cooked in a manner that persisted through the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages. This book first tells the story of prehistoric settlement, and moves on to explore the hunting and foraging techniques of the Mesolithic. After discussing the way in which the Britons farmed, and what they grew, the book moves into the roundhouse and the tools and utensils available. The final half of the book examines the varied techniques used, from covering fish in clay, to baking meat underground, spit roasting, brewing mead, boiling water with hot stones and so on. All the techniques have been carried out by the author.

The Prehistoric Settlement of Britain

The Prehistoric Settlement of Britain

Author: Richard Bradley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317612865

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 404

This study, first published in 1978, explores the evidence for pre-Roman settlement in Britain. Four aspects of the prehistoric economy are described by the author – colonisation and clearance; arable and pastoral farming; transhumance and nomadism; and hunting, gathering and fishing. These aspects have been brought together to formulate a structure which contains the evidence more naturally than chronological schemes that depend on assumed changes in population or technology. The book draws upon environmental evidence and recent developments in archaeological fieldwork. It also provides an extensive exploration of the published literature on the subject and the scope of the evidence. Originally conceived as an ‘ideas book’ rather than a final synthesis, the author’s intention throughout is to stimulate argument and research, and not to replace one dogma with another.

A History of the Peoples of the British Isles: From Prehistoric Times to 1688

A History of the Peoples of the British Isles: From Prehistoric Times to 1688

Author: Stanford Lehmberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134415281

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 279

The three volumes of A History of the Peoples of the British Isles weave together the histories of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales and their peoples. The authors trace the course of social, economic, cultural and political history from prehistoric times to the present, analyzing the relationships, differences and similarities of the four areas. Covering British history from prehistoric times to 1688, Volume I's main themes include: * the development of prehistoric, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Britain * discussions of family and class structures * Medieval British history * the Stuart and Tudor leaderships * the arts and intellectual developments from 1485 to 1688. Presenting a wealth of material on themes such as women's history, the family, religion, intellectual history, society, politics, and the arts, these volumes are an important resource for all students of the political and cultural heritage of the British Isles.