Prerational Intelligence: Adaptive Behavior and Intelligent Systems Without Symbols and Logic , Volume 1, Volume 2 Prerational Intelligence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Behavior of Natural and Artificial Systems

Prerational Intelligence: Adaptive Behavior and Intelligent Systems Without Symbols and Logic , Volume 1, Volume 2 Prerational Intelligence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Behavior of Natural and Artificial Systems

Author: Holk Cruse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401037922

Category: Computers

Page: 1611

View: 324

The present book is the product of conferences held in Bielefeld at the Center for interdisciplinary Sturlies (ZiF) in connection with a year-long ZiF Research Group with the theme "Prerational intelligence". The premise ex plored by the research group is that traditional notions of intelligent behav ior, which form the basis for much work in artificial intelligence and cog nitive science, presuppose many basic capabilities which are not trivial, as more recent work in robotics and neuroscience has shown, and that these capabilities may be best understood as ernerging from interaction and coop eration in systems of simple agents, elements that accept inputs from and act upon their surroundings. The main focus is on the way animals and artificial systems process in formation about their surroundings in order to move and act adaptively. The analysis of the collective properties of systems of interacting agents, how ever, is a problern that occurs repeatedly in many disciplines. Therefore, contributions from a wide variety of areas have been included in order to obtain a broad overview of phenomena that demoostrate complexity arising from simple interactions or can be described as adaptive behavior arising from the collective action of groups of agents. To this end we have invited contributions on topics ranging from the development of complex structures and functions in systems ranging from cellular automata, genetic codes, and neural connectivity to social behavior and evolution. Additional contribu tions discuss traditional concepts of intelligence and adaptive behavior. 1.

Prerational Intelligence: Adaptive Behavior and Intelligent Systems Without Symbols and Logic , Volume 1, Volume 2 Prerational Intelligence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Behavior of Natural and Artificial Systems, Volume 3

Prerational Intelligence: Adaptive Behavior and Intelligent Systems Without Symbols and Logic , Volume 1, Volume 2 Prerational Intelligence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Behavior of Natural and Artificial Systems, Volume 3

Author: Holk Cruse

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401008709

Category: Computers

Page: 1611

View: 168

The present book is the product of conferences held in Bielefeld at the Center for interdisciplinary Sturlies (ZiF) in connection with a year-long ZiF Research Group with the theme "Prerational intelligence". The premise ex plored by the research group is that traditional notions of intelligent behav ior, which form the basis for much work in artificial intelligence and cog nitive science, presuppose many basic capabilities which are not trivial, as more recent work in robotics and neuroscience has shown, and that these capabilities may be best understood as ernerging from interaction and coop eration in systems of simple agents, elements that accept inputs from and act upon their surroundings. The main focus is on the way animals and artificial systems process in formation about their surroundings in order to move and act adaptively. The analysis of the collective properties of systems of interacting agents, how ever, is a problern that occurs repeatedly in many disciplines. Therefore, contributions from a wide variety of areas have been included in order to obtain a broad overview of phenomena that demoostrate complexity arising from simple interactions or can be described as adaptive behavior arising from the collective action of groups of agents. To this end we have invited contributions on topics ranging from the development of complex structures and functions in systems ranging from cellular automata, genetic codes, and neural connectivity to social behavior and evolution. Additional contribu tions discuss traditional concepts of intelligence and adaptive behavior. 1.

Intelligent Systems and Applications

Intelligent Systems and Applications

Author: Kohei Arai

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030821937

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 897

View: 735

This book presents Proceedings of the 2021 Intelligent Systems Conference which is a remarkable collection of chapters covering a wider range of topics in areas of intelligent systems and artificial intelligence and their applications to the real world. The conference attracted a total of 496 submissions from many academic pioneering researchers, scientists, industrial engineers, and students from all around the world. These submissions underwent a double-blind peer-review process. Of the total submissions, 180 submissions have been selected to be included in these proceedings. As we witness exponential growth of computational intelligence in several directions and use of intelligent systems in everyday applications, this book is an ideal resource for reporting latest innovations and future of AI. The chapters include theory and application on all aspects of artificial intelligence, from classical to intelligent scope. We hope that readers find the book interesting and valuable; it provides the state-of-the-art intelligent methods and techniques for solving real-world problems along with a vision of the future research.

Superminds

Superminds

Author: Selmer Bringsjord

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401002837

Category: Philosophy

Page: 339

View: 855

This is the first book-length presentation and defense of a new theory of human and machine cognition, according to which human persons are superminds. Superminds are capable of processing information not only at and below the level of Turing machines (standard computers), but above that level (the "Turing Limit"), as information processing devices that have not yet been (and perhaps can never be) built, but have been mathematically specified; these devices are known as super-Turing machines or hypercomputers. Superminds, as explained herein, also have properties no machine, whether above or below the Turing Limit, can have. The present book is the third and pivotal volume in Bringsjord's supermind quartet; the first two books were What Robots Can and Can't Be (Kluwer) and AI and Literary Creativity (Lawrence Erlbaum). The final chapter of this book offers eight prescriptions for the concrete practice of AI and cognitive science in light of the fact that we are superminds.

Studying Animal Languages Without Translation: An Insight from Ants

Studying Animal Languages Without Translation: An Insight from Ants

Author: Zhanna Reznikova

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319449180

Category: Science

Page: 92

View: 921

The Author of this new volume on ant communication demonstrates that information theory is a valuable tool for studying the natural communication of animals. To do so, she pursues a fundamentally new approach to studying animal communication and “linguistic” capacities on the basis of measuring the rate of information transmission and the complexity of transmitted messages. Animals’ communication systems and cognitive abilities have long-since been a topic of particular interest to biologists, psychologists, linguists, and many others, including researchers in the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence. The main difficulties in the analysis of animal language have to date been predominantly methodological in nature. Addressing this perennial problem, the elaborated experimental paradigm presented here has been applied to ants, and can be extended to other social species of animals that have the need to memorize and relay complex “messages”. Accordingly, the method opens exciting new dimensions in the study of natural communications in the wild.

Task-space Separation Principle

Task-space Separation Principle

Author: Paolo Tommasino

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789811303531

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 105

View: 998

This book addresses two fundamental issues of motor control for both humans and robots: kinematic redundancy and the posture/movement problem. It blends traditional robotic constrained-optimal approaches with neuroscientific and evidence-based principles, proposing a “Task-space Separation Principle,” a novel scheme for planning both posture and movement in redundant manipulators. The proposed framework is first tested in simulation and then compared with experimental motor strategies displayed by humans during redundant pointing tasks. The book also shows how this model builds on and expands traditional formulations such as the Passive Motion Paradigm and the Equilibrium Point Theory. Lastly, breaking with the neuroscientific tradition of planar movements and linear(ized) kinematics, the theoretical formulation and experimental scenarios are set in the nonlinear space of 3D rotations which are essential for wrist motions, a somewhat neglected area despite its importance in daily tasks.

Food and Medicine

Food and Medicine

Author: Yogi Hale Hendlin

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030671150

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 196

View: 253

This edited volume provides a biosemiotic analysis of the ecological relationship between food and medicine. Drawing on the origins of semiotics in medicine, this collection proposes innovative ways of considering aliments and treatments. Considering the ever-evolving character of our understanding of meaning-making in biology, and considering the keen popular interest in issues relating to food and medicines - fueled by an increasing body of interdisciplinary knowledge - the contributions here provide diverse insights and arguments into the larger ecology of organisms’ engagement with and transformation through taking in matter. Bodies interpret molecules, enzymes, and alkaloids they intentionally and unintentionally come in contact with according to their pre-existing receptors. But their receptors are also changed by the experience. Once the body has identified a particular substance, it responds by initiating semiotic sequences and negotiations that fulfill vital functions for the organism at macro-, meso-, and micro-scales. Human abilities to distill and extract the living world into highly refined foods and medicines, however, have created substances far more potent than their counterparts in our historical evolution. Many of these substances also lack certain accompanying proteins, enzymes, and alkaloids that otherwise aid digestion or protect against side-effects in active extracted chemicals. Human biology has yet to catch up with human inventions such as supernormal foods and medicines that may flood receptors, overwhelming the body’s normal satiation mechanisms. This volume discusses how biosemioticians can come to terms with these networks of meaning, providing a valuable and provocative compendium for semioticians, medical researchers and practitioners, sociologists, cultural theorists, bioethicists and scholars investigating the interdisciplinary questions stemming from food and medicine.