Public Land in the Roman Republic

Public Land in the Roman Republic

Author: Saskia T. Roselaar

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191591488

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 225

In the first volume in this new series on Roman society and law, Saskia T. Roselaar traces the social and economic history of the ager publicus, or public land. As the Romans conquered Italy during the fourth to first centuries BC, they usually took land away from their defeated enemies and declared this to be the property of the Roman state. This land could be distributed to Roman citizens, but it could also remain in the hands of the state, in which case it was available for general public use. However, in the third and second centuries BC growth in the population of Italy led to an increased demand for land among both commercial producers and small farmers. This in turn led to the gradual privatization of the state-owned land, as those who held it wanted to safeguard their rights to it. Roselaar traces the currents in Roman economy and demography which led to these developments.

Judicial Reform and Land Reform in the Roman Republic

Judicial Reform and Land Reform in the Roman Republic

Author: Andrew William Lintott

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521403731

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 472

Twelve fragments of bronze were found near Urbino in the late fifteenth century, engraved with Roman laws - on one side a law concerning extortion, on the other an agrarian law. Dating as they do from the time of the Gracchi and of Marius in the later years of the Roman Republic, the laws are of considerable interest to Roman historians and are important evidence for the understanding of the revolutionary period which led to the overthrow of the Republic. In this volume, Dr Lintott offers a complete re-edition of these complicated and fragmentary texts, including a revision of the relationship between the fragments and full discussion of the manuscript sources of those now lost. The texts are accompanied by facing English translations and the commentary which follows discusses in detail the issues involved in establishing and restoring the texts. A series of introductory chapters, written as far as possible in non-technical language, give a summary of the context of the laws from both a legal and an historical view point.

Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic

Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic

Author: Valentina Arena

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139620161

Category: History

Page:

View: 571

This is a comprehensive analysis of the idea of libertas and its conflicting uses in the political struggles of the late Roman Republic. By reconstructing Roman political thinking about liberty against the background of Classical and Hellenistic thought, it excavates two distinct intellectual traditions on the means allowing for the preservation and the loss of libertas. Considering the interplay of these traditions in the political debates of the first century BC, Dr Arena offers a significant reinterpretation of the political struggles of the time as well as a radical reappraisal of the role played by the idea of liberty in the practice of politics. She argues that, as a result of its uses in rhetorical debates, libertas underwent a form of conceptual change at the end of the Republic and came to legitimise a new course of politics, which led progressively to the transformation of the whole political system.

End of the Roman Republic 146 to 44 BC

End of the Roman Republic 146 to 44 BC

Author: Catherine Steel

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748629022

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 476

In 146 BC the armies of Rome destroyed Carthage and emerged as the decisive victors of the Third Punic War. The Carthaginian population was sold and its territory became the Roman province of Africa. In the same year and on the other side of the Mediterranean Roman troops sacked Corinth, the final blow in the defeat of the Achaean conspiracy: thereafter Greece was effectively administered by Rome. Rome was now supreme in Italy, the Balkans, Greece, Macedonia, Sicily, and North Africa, and its power and influence were advancing in all directions. However, not all was well. The unchecked seizure of huge tracts of land in Italy and its farming by vast numbers of newly imported slaves allowed an elite of usually absentee landlords to amass enormous and conspicuous fortunes. Insecurity and resentment fed the gulf between rich and poor in Rome and erupted in a series of violent upheavals in the politics and institutions of the Republic. These were exacerbated by slave revolts and invasions from the east.

A Companion to the Political Culture of the Roman Republic

A Companion to the Political Culture of the Roman Republic

Author: Valentina Arena

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444339659

Category: History

Page: 628

View: 389

An insightful and original exploration of Roman Republic politics In A Companion to the Political Culture of the Roman Republic, editors Valentina Arena and Jonathan Prag deliver an incisive and original collection of forty contributions from leading academics representing various intellectual and academic traditions. The collected works represent some of the best scholarship in recent decades and adopt a variety of approaches, each of which confronts major problems in the field and contributes to ongoing research. The book represents a new, updated, and comprehensive view of the political world of Republican Rome and some of the included essays are available in English for the first time. Divided into six parts, the discussions consider the institutionalized loci, political actors, and values, rituals, and discourse that characterized Republican Rome. The Companion also offers several case studies and sections on the history of the interpretation of political life in the Roman Republic. Key features include: A thorough introduction to the Roman political world as seen through the wider lenses of Roman political culture Comprehensive explorations of the fundamental components of Roman political culture, including ideas and values, civic and religious rituals, myths, and communicative strategies Practical discussions of Roman Republic institutions, both with reference to their formal rules and prescriptions, and as patterns of social organization In depth examinations of the 'afterlife' of the Roman Republic, both in ancient authors and in early modern and modern times Perfect for students of all levels of the ancient world, A Companion to the Political Culture of the Roman Republic will also earn a place in the libraries of scholars and students of politics, political history, and the history of ideas.

Roman Law and Economics

Roman Law and Economics

Author: Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191090981

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 882

Ancient Rome is the only society in the history of the western world whose legal profession evolved autonomously, distinct and separate from institutions of political and religious power. Roman legal thought has left behind an enduring legacy and exerted enormous influence on the shaping of modern legal frameworks and systems, but its own genesis and context pose their own explanatory problems. The economic analysis of Roman law has enormous untapped potential in this regard: by exploring the intersecting perspectives of legal history, economic history, and the economic analysis of law, the two volumes of Roman Law and Economics are able to offer a uniquely interdisciplinary examination of the origins of Roman legal institutions, their functions, and their evolution over a period of more than 1000 years, in response to changes in the underlying economic activities that those institutions regulated. Volume I explores these legal institutions and organizations in detail, from the constitution of the Roman Republic to the management of business in the Empire, while Volume II covers the concepts of exchange, ownership, and disputes, analysing the detailed workings of credit, property, and slavery, among others. Throughout each volume, contributions from specialists in legal and economic history, law, and legal theory are underpinned by rigorous analysis drawing on modern empirical and theoretical techniques and methodologies borrowed from economics. In demonstrating how these can be fruitfully applied to the study of ancient societies, with due deference to the historical context, Roman Law and Economics opens up a host of new avenues of research for scholars and students in each of these fields and in the social sciences more broadly, offering new ways in which different modes of enquiry can connect with and inform each other.

On the Fall of the Roman Republic

On the Fall of the Roman Republic

Author: Tom Strunk

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9781839980558

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 278

On the Republic juxtaposes the fall of the Roman Republic with the contemporary political landscape of the United States: a republic in disarray, violence and corruption thwarting the will of the people, military misadventures abroad, and rampant economic inequality diminishing a shared sense of the common good.

Foodways in Roman Republican Italy

Foodways in Roman Republican Italy

Author: Laura M. Banducci

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472132300

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 403

Foodways in Roman Republican Italy explores the production, preparation, and consumption of food and drink in Republican Italy to illuminate the nature of cultural change during this period. Traditionally, studies of the cultural effects of Roman contact and conquest have focused on observing changes in the public realm: that is, changing urban organization and landscape, and monumental construction. Foodways studies reach into the domestic realm: How do the daily behaviors of individuals express their personal identity, and How does this relate to changes and expressions of identity in broader society? Laura M. Banducci tracks through time the foodways of three sites in Etruria from about the third century BCE to the first century CE: Populonia, Musarna, and Cetamura del Chianti. All were established Etruscan sites that came under Roman political control over the course of the third and second centuries BCE. The book examines the morphology and use wear of ceramics used for cooking, preparing, and serving food in order to deduce cooking methods and the types of foods being prepared and consumed. Change in domestic behaviors was gradual and regionally varied, depending on local social and environmental conditions, shaping rather than responding to an explicitly “Roman” presence.