Nineteenth-Century Religion, Literature and Society

Nineteenth-Century Religion, Literature and Society

Author: Richa Dwor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351272148

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 914

This four-volume historical resource provides new opportunities for investigating the relationship between religion, literature and society in Britain and its imperial territories by making accessible a diverse selection of harder-to-find primary sources. These include religious fiction, poetry, essays, memoirs, sermons, travel writing, religious ephemera, unpublished notebooks and pamphlet literature. Spanning the long nineteenth century (c.1789–1914), the resource departs from older models of ‘the Victorian crisis of faith’ in order to open up new ways of conceptualising religion. This third volume looks at ‘religious feeling’ as an important and distinct category for understanding the ways in which religion is embodied and expressed in culture.

Nineteenth-Century Religion, Literature and Society

Nineteenth-Century Religion, Literature and Society

Author: Angharad Eyre

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351272186

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 926

This four-volume historical resource provides new opportunities for investigating the relationship between religion, literature and society in Britain and its imperial territories by making accessible a diverse selection of harder-to-find primary sources. These include religious fiction, poetry, essays, memoirs, sermons, travel writing, religious ephemera, unpublished notebooks and pamphlet literature. Spanning the long nineteenth century (c.1789–1914), the resource departs from older models of ‘the Victorian crisis of faith’ in order to open up new ways of conceptualising religion. This second volume is called ‘Mission and Reform’ and it considers the social and political importance of religious faith and practice as expressed through foreign and domestic mission and philanthropic and political movements at home and abroad.

The Economy of Religion in American Literature

The Economy of Religion in American Literature

Author: Andrew Ball

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350231689

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 363

Examining how economic change influences religion, and the way literature mediates that influence, this book provides a thorough reassessment of modern American culture. Focusing on the period 1840-1940, the author shows how the development of capitalism reshaped American Protestantism and addresses the necessary role of literature in that process. Arguing that the “spirit of capitalism” was not fostered by traditional Puritanism, Ball explores the ways that Christianity was transformed by the market and industrial revolutions. This book refutes the long-held secularization thesis by showing that modernity was a time when new forms of the sacred proliferated, and that this religious flourishing was essential to the production of American culture. Ball draws from the work of Émile Durkheim and cultural sociology to interpret modern social upheavals like religious awakenings, revivalism, and the labor movement. Examining work from writers like Rebecca Harding Davis, Jack London, and Countee Cullen, he shows how concepts of salvation fundamentally intersect with matters of race, gender, and class, and proposes a theory that explains the enchantment of modern American society.

Play, Literature, Religion

Play, Literature, Religion

Author: Virgil Nemoianu

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791409368

Category: Religion

Page: 221

View: 454

Using the concept of play as a common denominator, 11 essays outline the various ways literary creativity can act as a free, open, and speculatively unburdened expression of religious concerns. The examples range from the midrashic implications of early Biblical texts, to 20th-century exegeses. Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Religion and American Literature Since 1950

Religion and American Literature Since 1950

Author: Mark Eaton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350123779

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 439

From Flannery O'Connor and James Baldwin to the post-9/11 writings of Don DeLillo, imaginative writers have often been the most insightful chroniclers of the USA's changing religious life since the end of World War II. Exploring a wide range of writers from Protestant, Catholic, Jewish and secular faiths, this book is an in-depth study of contemporary fiction's engagement with religious belief, identity and practice. Through readings of major writers of our time like Saul Bellow, E. L. Doctorow, Philip Roth, Marilynne Robinson and John Updike, Mark Eaton discovers a more nuanced picture of the varieties of American religious experience: that they are more commonplace than cultural ideas of progressive secularisation or faith-based polarization might suggest.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern English Literature and Religion

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern English Literature and Religion

Author: Andrew Hiscock

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191653438

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 720

View: 607

This pioneering Handbook offers a comprehensive consideration of the dynamic relationship between English literature and religion in the early modern period. The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were the most turbulent times in the history of the British church and, perhaps as a result, produced some of the greatest devotional poetry, sermons, polemics, and epics of literature in English. The early-modern interaction of rhetoric and faith is addressed in thirty-nine chapters of original research, divided into five sections. The first analyses the changes within the church from the Reformation to the establishment of the Church of England, the phenomenon of puritanism and the rise of non-conformity. The second section discusses ten genres in which faith was explored, including poetry, prophecy, drama, sermons, satire, and autobiographical writings. The middle section focuses on selected individual authors, among them Thomas More, Christopher Marlowe, John Donne, Lucy Hutchinson, and John Milton. Since authors never write in isolation, the fourth section examines a range of communities in which writers interpreted their faith: lay and religious households, sectarian groups including the Quakers, clusters of religious exiles, Jewish and Islamic communities, and those who settled in the new world. Finally, the fifth section considers some key topics and debates in early modern religious literature, ranging from ideas of authority and the relationship of body and soul, to death, judgment, and eternity. The Handbook is framed by a succinct introduction, a chronology of religious and literary landmarks, a guide for new researchers in this field, and a full bibliography of primary and secondary texts relating to early modern English literature and religion.

Science and Religion in Western Literature

Science and Religion in Western Literature

Author: Michael Fuller

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000624304

Category: Religion

Page: 188

View: 833

This book explores ways in which Western literature has engaged with themes found within the field of science and religion, both historically and in the present day. It focuses on works of the imagination as important locations at which human arguments, hopes and fears may be played out. The chapters examine a variety of instances where scientific and religious ideas are engaged by novelists, poets and dramatists, casting new light upon those ideas and suggesting constructive ways in which science and religion may interact. The contributors cover a rich variety of authors, including Mary Shelley, Aldous Huxley, R. S. Thomas, Philip Pullman and Margaret Atwood. Together they form a fascinating set of reflections on some of the significant issues encountered within the discourse of science and religion, indicating ways in which the insights of creative artists can make a valuable and important contribution to that discourse.

Literature and Religious Experience

Literature and Religious Experience

Author: Matthew J. Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350193925

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 665

This book challenges the status quo of studies in literature and religion by returning to “experience” as a bridge between theory and practice. Essays focus on keywords of religious experience and demonstrate their applications in drama, fiction, and poetry. Each chapter explores the broad significance of its keyword as a category of psychological and social behavior and tracks its unique articulation by individual authors, including Conrad, Beecher Stowe and Melville. Together, the chapters construct a critical foundation for studying literature not only from the perspectives of theology and historicism but from the ways that literary experience reflects, reinforces, and sometimes challenges religious experience.