Statistics with Mathematica

Statistics with Mathematica

Author: Martha L. Abell

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0120415542

Category: Mathematics

Page: 654

View: 838

Covers the use of Mathematica for applications ranging from descriptive statistics, through multiple regression and nonparametric methods; uses virtually all of Mathematica's built-in statistical commands, as well as those contained in various Mathematica packages; Additionally, the authors have written numerous procedures to extend Mathematica's capabilities, which are also included on the CD-ROM

Mathematica Laboratories for Mathematical Statistics

Mathematica Laboratories for Mathematical Statistics

Author: Jenny A. Baglivo

Publisher: SIAM

ISBN: 9780898718416

Category: Mathematics

Page: 280

View: 276

Integrating computers into mathematical statistics courses allows students to simulate experiments and visualize their results, handle larger data sets, analyze data more quickly, and compare the results of classical methods of data analysis with those using alternative techniques. This text presents a concise introduction to the concepts of probability theory and mathematical statistics. The accompanying in-class and take-home computer laboratory activities reinforce the techniques introduced in the text and are accessible to students with little or no experience with Mathematica. These laboratory materials present applications in a variety of real-world settings, with data from epidemiology, environmental sciences, medicine, social sciences, physical sciences, manufacturing, engineering, marketing, and sports. Mathematica Laboratories for Mathematical Statistics: Emphasizing Simulation and Computer Intensive Methods includes parametric, nonparametric, permutation, bootstrap and diagnostic methods. Chapters on permutation and bootstrap techniques follow the formal inference chapters and precede the chapters on intermediate-level topics. Permutation and bootstrap methods are discussed side by side with classical methods in the later chapters.

Compstat

Compstat

Author: Wolfgang Härdle

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783642574894

Category: Computers

Page: 648

View: 695

This COMPSTAT 2002 book contains the Keynote, Invited, and Full Contributed papers presented in Berlin, August 2002. A companion volume including Short Communications and Posters is published on CD. The COMPSTAT 2002 is the 15th conference in a serie of biannual conferences with the objective to present the latest developments in Computational Statistics and is taking place from August 24th to August 28th, 2002. Previous COMPSTATs were in Vienna (1974), Berlin (1976), Leiden (1978), Edinburgh (1980), Toulouse (1982), Pra~ue (1984), Rome (1986), Copenhagen (1988), Dubrovnik (1990), Neuchatel (1992), Vienna (1994), Barcelona (1996), Bris tol (1998) and Utrecht (2000). COMPSTAT 2002 is organised by CASE, Center of Applied Statistics and Eco nomics at Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin in cooperation with F'reie Universitat Berlin and University of Potsdam. The topics of COMPSTAT include methodological applications, innovative soft ware and mathematical developments, especially in the following fields: statistical risk management, multivariate and robust analysis, Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods, statistics of E-commerce, new strategies in teaching (Multimedia, In ternet), computerbased sampling/questionnaires, analysis of large databases (with emphasis on computing in memory), graphical tools for data analysis, classification and clustering, new statistical software and historical development of software.

All of Statistics

All of Statistics

Author: Larry Wasserman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387402721

Category: Computers

Page: 468

View: 279

This book is for people who want to learn probability and statistics quickly. It brings together many of the main ideas in modern statistics in one place. The book is suitable for students and researchers in statistics, computer science, data mining and machine learning. This book covers a much wider range of topics than a typical introductory text on mathematical statistics. It includes modern topics like nonparametric curve estimation, bootstrapping and classification, topics that are usually relegated to follow-up courses. The reader is assumed to know calculus and a little linear algebra. No previous knowledge of probability and statistics is required. The text can be used at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. Larry Wasserman is Professor of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also a member of the Center for Automated Learning and Discovery in the School of Computer Science. His research areas include nonparametric inference, asymptotic theory, causality, and applications to astrophysics, bioinformatics, and genetics. He is the 1999 winner of the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies Presidents' Award and the 2002 winner of the Centre de recherches mathematiques de Montreal–Statistical Society of Canada Prize in Statistics. He is Associate Editor of The Journal of the American Statistical Association and The Annals of Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

All of Nonparametric Statistics

All of Nonparametric Statistics

Author: Larry Wasserman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387306230

Category: Mathematics

Page: 270

View: 504

This text provides the reader with a single book where they can find accounts of a number of up-to-date issues in nonparametric inference. The book is aimed at Masters or PhD level students in statistics, computer science, and engineering. It is also suitable for researchers who want to get up to speed quickly on modern nonparametric methods. It covers a wide range of topics including the bootstrap, the nonparametric delta method, nonparametric regression, density estimation, orthogonal function methods, minimax estimation, nonparametric confidence sets, and wavelets. The book’s dual approach includes a mixture of methodology and theory.

Testing Statistical Hypotheses

Testing Statistical Hypotheses

Author: Erich L. Lehmann

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387276052

Category: Mathematics

Page: 786

View: 969

The third edition of Testing Statistical Hypotheses updates and expands upon the classic graduate text, emphasizing optimality theory for hypothesis testing and confidence sets. The principal additions include a rigorous treatment of large sample optimality, together with the requisite tools. In addition, an introduction to the theory of resampling methods such as the bootstrap is developed. The sections on multiple testing and goodness of fit testing are expanded. The text is suitable for Ph.D. students in statistics and includes over 300 new problems out of a total of more than 760.

Vector Generalized Linear and Additive Models

Vector Generalized Linear and Additive Models

Author: Thomas W. Yee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781493928187

Category: Mathematics

Page: 589

View: 542

This book presents a greatly enlarged statistical framework compared to generalized linear models (GLMs) with which to approach regression modelling. Comprising of about half-a-dozen major classes of statistical models, and fortified with necessary infrastructure to make the models more fully operable, the framework allows analyses based on many semi-traditional applied statistics models to be performed as a coherent whole. Since their advent in 1972, GLMs have unified important distributions under a single umbrella with enormous implications. However, GLMs are not flexible enough to cope with the demands of practical data analysis. And data-driven GLMs, in the form of generalized additive models (GAMs), are also largely confined to the exponential family. The methodology here and accompanying software (the extensive VGAM R package) are directed at these limitations and are described comprehensively for the first time in one volume. This book treats distributions and classical models as generalized regression models, and the result is a much broader application base for GLMs and GAMs. The book can be used in senior undergraduate or first-year postgraduate courses on GLMs or categorical data analysis and as a methodology resource for VGAM users. In the second part of the book, the R package VGAM allows readers to grasp immediately applications of the methodology. R code is integrated in the text, and datasets are used throughout. Potential applications include ecology, finance, biostatistics, and social sciences. The methodological contribution of this book stands alone and does not require use of the VGAM package.

Mathematica Navigator

Mathematica Navigator

Author: Heikki Ruskeepaa

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780080920993

Category: Mathematics

Page: 1136

View: 963

Ruskeepaa gives a general introduction to the most recent versions of Mathematica, the symbolic computation software from Wolfram. The book emphasizes graphics, methods of applied mathematics and statistics, and programming. Mathematica Navigator can be used both as a tutorial and as a handbook. While no previous experience with Mathematica is required, most chapters also include advanced material, so that the book will be a valuable resource for both beginners and experienced users. - Covers both Mathematica 6 and Mathematica 7 - The book, fully revised and updated, is based on Mathematica 6 - Comprehensive coverage from basic, introductory information through to more advanced topics - Studies several real data sets and many classical mathematical models

The History of Statistics

The History of Statistics

Author: Stephen M. Stigler

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674256859

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 852

This magnificent book is the first comprehensive history of statistics from its beginnings around 1700 to its emergence as a distinct and mature discipline around 1900. Stephen M. Stigler shows how statistics arose from the interplay of mathematical concepts and the needs of several applied sciences including astronomy, geodesy, experimental psychology, genetics, and sociology. He addresses many intriguing questions: How did scientists learn to combine measurements made under different conditions? And how were they led to use probability theory to measure the accuracy of the result? Why were statistical methods used successfully in astronomy long before they began to play a significant role in the social sciences? How could the introduction of least squares predate the discovery of regression by more than eighty years? On what grounds can the major works of men such as Bernoulli, De Moivre, Bayes, Quetelet, and Lexis be considered partial failures, while those of Laplace, Galton, Edgeworth, Pearson, and Yule are counted as successes? How did Galton’s probability machine (the quincunx) provide him with the key to the major advance of the last half of the nineteenth century? Stigler’s emphasis is upon how, when, and where the methods of probability theory were developed for measuring uncertainty in experimental and observational science, for reducing uncertainty, and as a conceptual framework for quantitative studies in the social sciences. He describes with care the scientific context in which the different methods evolved and identifies the problems (conceptual or mathematical) that retarded the growth of mathematical statistics and the conceptual developments that permitted major breakthroughs. Statisticians, historians of science, and social and behavioral scientists will gain from this book a deeper understanding of the use of statistical methods and a better grasp of the promise and limitations of such techniques. The product of ten years of research, The History of Statistics will appeal to all who are interested in the humanistic study of science.