The Apocalypse of John

The Apocalypse of John

Author: Francis J. SDB Moloney

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN: 9781493423798

Category: Religion

Page: 432

View: 687

In this major, paradigm-shifting commentary on Revelation, internationally respected author Francis Moloney brings his keen narrative and exegetical work to bear on one of the most difficult, mysterious, and misinterpreted texts in the biblical canon. Challenging the assumed consensus among New Testament scholars, Moloney reads Revelation not as an exhortation to faithfulness in a period of persecution but as a celebration of the ongoing effects of Jesus's death and resurrection. Foreword by Eugenio Corsini.

The Apocalypse of John

The Apocalypse of John

Author: Sean P. Kealy

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN: 0814655815

Category: Religion

Page: 262

View: 703

The Apocalypse has been one of the most fascinating and most frustrating books of the Bible. Interpretations abound, yet the mystery at the heart of it continues to intrigue scholars. Father Kealy's thoughts on the Apocalypse are provocative, stimulating a search for quality in living, for values, for ultimates, for growth in hope.

The Lamb Christology of the Apocalypse of John

The Lamb Christology of the Apocalypse of John

Author: Loren L. Johns

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 316148164X

Category: Religion

Page: 300

View: 855

"What did ""Lamb"" symbolize in the ancient near Eastern world? What did it convey to the first-century audience of the Revelation? And why did the author use this symbol? Loren J. Johns analyzes the symbolic meaning of apviov in the Apocalypse of John as the Central feature of the Christology of Revelation."

The Mandate of the Church in the Apocalypse of John

The Mandate of the Church in the Apocalypse of John

Author: Olutola K. Peters

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 0820474614

Category: Religion

Page: 190

View: 270

The Mandate of the Church in the Apocalypse of John fills a gap in the scholarly literature on the Apocalypse of John by offering a comprehensive discussion of what the Church is called upon to be and do. It delineates various tasks and functions of the Church, showing how they relate to one another and also how they are all unified under the mandate to provide faithful witness to Jesus. With its strong emphasis on the ethical concerns of the Apocalypse, this book challenges the view that John's Apocalypse is sub-Christian in its ethics.

A Commentary on the Apocalypse of John

A Commentary on the Apocalypse of John

Author: Edmondo F. Lupieri

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802860736

Category: Religion

Page: 426

View: 827

Edmondo Lupieri's main goal in A Commentary on the Apocalypse of John is to introduce readers to the mental and spiritual world of John as both a first-century Jew and a follower of Jesus. The fruit of over ten years of research, a constructive response to postmodern criticism, and an academic best-seller in its Italian edition, Lupieri's commentary offers both new proposals and traditional interpretations to shed light on this complex coda to the biblical message. In an illuminating preface Lupieri discusses the strange world of the Apocalypse and promises an open commentary, full of original treatments of knotty interpretive problems. Maintaining a strong historical perspective throughout, he examines the text of the Apocalypse line by line, paying careful attention to the Greek text, offering a new translation, making wide use of apocryphal, pseudepigraphal, and Qumran literature, and often analyzing John's Apocalypse as compared to other Jewish apocalypses. Thoughtful, thorough, and nonsectarian, Lupieri's Commentary on the Apocalypse of John will appeal to anyone with a serious interest in the meaning of the biblical text.

The Apocalypse

The Apocalypse

Author: Charles H. Talbert

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 0664253636

Category: Religion

Page: 140

View: 275

In this concise and clearly written commentary, Charles H. Talbert brings to mainline Christians a fresh reading of the book of Revelation, demonstrating that it is not only accessible but relevant for the modern-day Christian. According to Talbert, the primary causes of the marginalized status of the book of Revelation by mainline Christians are threefold--the apparent inaccessibility of its meaning, the seeming impossibility of its pastoral application, and its demonstrated susceptibility to abuse. Talbert ably demonstrates that the book of Revelation was written to help the early Christians avoid assimilation into the larger pagan culture. Talbert also gives full attention to the literature of the Greco-Roman, early Christian, and early Jewish worlds as he examines the more mystical components of the narrative.

Revelation

Revelation

Author: Gerald L. Stevens

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781625645494

Category: Religion

Page: 668

View: 911

This three-part study covers the history of interpretation, theological foundations, and exegesis. Copious illustrations from the author's worldwide travels enhance discussion of Rome's emperors, empire, and ideology as the premier horizon for understanding John's immediate context and meaning. Distinctive contributions include Stevens's effort to re-canonize Revelation by insisting on gospel concord, methodically interpreting all of Revelation through the lens of the seven churches and showing how Revelation's imagery consistently relates more to the incarnation than the Parousia. Stevens bypasses traditional millennial options to argue that Revelation is passion-millennial--the passion of Jesus predicates the passion of the church. Under Stevens's hands, Revelation becomes eminently sensible to the original audience and powerfully pertinent for today's church.

Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of John

Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of John

Author: Steven J. Friesen

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195131536

Category: Religion

Page: 300

View: 562

After more than a century of debate about the significance of imperial cults for the interpretation of Revelation, this is the first study to examine both the archaeological evidence and the Biblical text in depth. Friesen argues that a detailed analysis of imperial cults as they were practiced in the first century CE in the region where John was active allows us to understand John's criticism of his society's dominant values. He demonstrates the importance of imperial cults for society at the time when Revelation was written, and shows the ways in which John refuted imperial cosmology through his use of vision, myth, and eschatological expectation.