The British Pacific Fleet

The British Pacific Fleet

Author: David Hobbs

Publisher:

ISBN: 1526702835

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 946

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist. Six months later it was strong enough to launch air attacks on Japanese territory, and by the end of the war it constituted the most powerful force in the history of the Royal Navy, fighting as professional equals alongside the U.S. Navy. How this was achieved by a nation nearing exhaustion after five years of conflict is a story of epic proportions in which ingenuity, diplomacy, and dogged persistence all played a part. This ground-breaking new work by David Hobbs describes the background, creation, and expansion of the British Pacific Fleet from its first tentative strikes, through operations off the coast of Japan, to its impact on the immediate post-war period. It includes the opinions of U.S. Navy liaison officers attached to the British flagships.

The British Pacific Fleet Experience and Legacy, 1944–50

The British Pacific Fleet Experience and Legacy, 1944–50

Author: Jon Robb-Webb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317039815

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 408

The British Pacific Fleet was formed in October 1944 and dispatched to fight alongside the USN in the Central Pacific under Admiral Nimitz. Deploying previously unpublished documents, this book reveals how relations between the UK and US forces developed from a starting point of barely repressed suspicion, to one where both navies came to understand each other and eventually find a remarkable bond. Born out of a shared experience of Kamikaze attacks, extended operations against bitterly hostile shores, the pooling of knowledge and experience, the two navies underpinned the diplomatic moves in both Washington and London. The book carries the legacy of this experience through to the next Anglo-American participation in war, Korea. It illustrates and explains how and why certain lessons were incorporated into the composition, behaviour and structure of the post-war Navy. It demonstrates the significance of what was learned from the USN by the RN and by USN from the RN. As well as examining the background to the largest fleet the Royal Navy ever put to sea, the book also charts its effects on Anglo-American relations, multinational operations, alliance building, and the ways naval forces are shaped by and in turn shape politics. It addresses a period of rapid technological development that witnessed profound changes in the international system, and which raised fundamental questions of what navies were for and how should they operate and organize themselves. In so doing the study illustrates how the experience of a few long months at the end of the war in the Pacific would cast a long shadow over these issues in the very different circumstances of the post-war world.

The British Pacific Fleet

The British Pacific Fleet

Author: David Hobbs

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781783469222

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 832

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist. Six months later it was strong enough to launch air attacks on Japanese territory, and by the end of the war it constituted the most powerful force in the history of the Royal Navy, fighting as professional equals alongside the US Navy in the thick of the action. How this was achieved by a nation nearing exhaustion after five years of conflict is a story of epic proportions in which ingenuity, diplomacy and dogged persistence all played a part. As much a political as a technical triumph, the BPF was uniquely complex in its make-up: its C-in-C was responsible to the Admiralty for the general direction of his Fleet; took operational orders from the American Admiral Nimitz; answered to the Government of Australia for the construction and maintenance of a vast base infrastructure, and to other Commonwealth Governments for the ships and men that formed his fully-integrated multi-national fleet.This ground-breaking new work by David Hobbs describes the background, creation and expansion of the BPF from its first tentative strikes, through operations off the coast of Japan to its impact on the immediate post-war period, including the opinions of USN liaison officers attached to the British flagships. The book is the first to demonstrate the real scope and scale of the BPFs impressive achievement.

The British Pacific Fleet Experience and Legacy, 1944–50

The British Pacific Fleet Experience and Legacy, 1944–50

Author: Jon Robb-Webb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317039822

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 384

The British Pacific Fleet was formed in October 1944 and dispatched to fight alongside the USN in the Central Pacific under Admiral Nimitz. Deploying previously unpublished documents, this book reveals how relations between the UK and US forces developed from a starting point of barely repressed suspicion, to one where both navies came to understand each other and eventually find a remarkable bond. Born out of a shared experience of Kamikaze attacks, extended operations against bitterly hostile shores, the pooling of knowledge and experience, the two navies underpinned the diplomatic moves in both Washington and London. The book carries the legacy of this experience through to the next Anglo-American participation in war, Korea. It illustrates and explains how and why certain lessons were incorporated into the composition, behaviour and structure of the post-war Navy. It demonstrates the significance of what was learned from the USN by the RN and by USN from the RN. As well as examining the background to the largest fleet the Royal Navy ever put to sea, the book also charts its effects on Anglo-American relations, multinational operations, alliance building, and the ways naval forces are shaped by and in turn shape politics. It addresses a period of rapid technological development that witnessed profound changes in the international system, and which raised fundamental questions of what navies were for and how should they operate and organize themselves. In so doing the study illustrates how the experience of a few long months at the end of the war in the Pacific would cast a long shadow over these issues in the very different circumstances of the post-war world.

Fleets of the Royal Navy

Fleets of the Royal Navy

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230480463

Category:

Page: 28

View: 682

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: British Pacific Fleet, List of Eastern Fleet ships, Mediterranean Fleet, Pacific Station, List of fleets and major commands of the Royal Navy, Home Fleet, List of ships assigned to the Australian Squadron, Channel Fleet, Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth, Australia Station, Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth, Commander-in-Chief Fleet, West Africa Squadron, China Station, Commander-in-Chief, The Nore, Western Approaches Command, South Atlantic Station, East Indies Station, Cape of Good Hope Station, Atlantic Fleet, Grand Fleet, Western Fleet, East Indies and China Station. Excerpt: The British Pacific Fleet (BPF) was a British Commonwealth naval force which saw action against Japan during World War II. The fleet was composed of British Commonwealth naval vessels. The BPF formally came into being on 22 November 1944. Its main base was at Sydney, Australia, with a forward base at Manus Island. The British Pacific Fleet was, and remains, the most powerful conventional war fleet assembled by the Royal Navy. By VJ Day it included four battleships, eighteen aircraft carriers, eleven cruisers and many smaller warships and support vessels. Despite this, it was dwarfed by the forces that the United States had in action against Japan. While the British fleet was not critical to the war in the Pacific, it did participate in and protect the flank of the final Allied drive against Japan in 1945. Following their retreat to the western side of the Indian Ocean in 1942, British naval forces did not return to the South West Pacific theatre until 17 May 1944, when an Anglo-American carrier task force implemented Operation Transom, a joint raid on Surabaya, Java. The U.S. was liberating British territories in the Pacific and extending its influence. It was therefore seen as a political and military imperative to restore a British presence in...

Military Units and Formations of the Royal Navy in World War Ii

Military Units and Formations of the Royal Navy in World War Ii

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230593225

Category:

Page: 30

View: 626

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 28. Chapters: British Pacific Fleet, List of Eastern Fleet ships, Mediterranean Fleet, 835 Naval Air Squadron, Force H, 2nd Escort Group, Home Fleet, Allied Technical Air Intelligence Unit, 750 Naval Air Squadron, 3rd Battle Squadron, B-6 Escort Group, B-7 Escort Group, 700 Naval Air Squadron, B-2 Escort Group, 36th Escort Group, 2nd Battle Squadron, Battlecruiser Squadron, 5th Escort Group, Force K, 14th/17th Minesweeper Flotilla, 792 Naval Air Squadron, Force Z, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron. Excerpt: The British Pacific Fleet (BPF) was a British Commonwealth naval force which saw action against Japan during World War II. The fleet was composed of British Commonwealth naval vessels. The BPF formally came into being on 22 November 1944. Its main base was at Sydney, Australia, with a forward base at Manus Island. The British Pacific Fleet was, and remains, the most powerful conventional war fleet assembled by the Royal Navy. By VJ Day it included four battleships, eighteen aircraft carriers, eleven cruisers and many smaller warships and support vessels. Despite this, it was dwarfed by the forces that the United States had in action against Japan. While the British fleet was not critical to the war in the Pacific, it did participate in and protect the flank of the final Allied drive against Japan in 1945. Following their retreat to the western side of the Indian Ocean in 1942, British naval forces did not return to the South West Pacific theatre until 17 May 1944, when an Anglo-American carrier task force implemented Operation Transom, a joint raid on Surabaya, Java. The U.S. was liberating British territories in the Pacific and extending its influence. It was therefore seen as a political and military imperative to restore a British presence in the region and to deploy British military assets directly against Japan. The British...

Summary of John Winton's The Forgotten Fleet

Summary of John Winton's The Forgotten Fleet

Author: Everest Media,

Publisher: Everest Media LLC

ISBN: 9798822547216

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 63

View: 579

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book. Sample Book Insights: #1 The attack on Force Z, which was the British battleship Prince of Wales, the battlecruiser Repulse, and four destroyers, was the end result of a train of unfortunate circumstances. By November 1944, when the British Pacific Fleet was formally in being, the United States Navy and Marine Corps had already won for the Allies nearly complete control of sea and air over most of the Pacific. #2 The British Pacific and East Indies Fleets were a magnificent contribution by a nation 10,000 miles from the action who had already fought a war at sea for five years and over five oceans. But the American 3rd/5th and 7th Fleets were far larger and more powerful than both British fleets combined. #3 The fall of Singapore was a dark and terrible episode for the Navy, but there were two gallant naval actions fought by Allied ships in the Java Sea on 27 and 28 February. Four cruisers and three destroyers were sunk in these actions. #4 The Japanese raiders were Vice Admiral Nagumo’s formidable Striking Force, which included five of the six carriers that attacked Pearl Harbour. They attacked Colombo on Easter Sunday, 5 April, and sank the cruisers Cornwall and Dorsetshire.