The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne

The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne

Author: Tim Murray, Kristal Buckley, Sarah Hayes, Geoff Hewitt, Justin McCarthy, Richard Mackay, Barbara Minchinton, Charlotte Smith, Jeremy Smith and Bronwyn Woff

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743323694

Category: Social Science

Page: 162

View: 717

For much of the 19th and 20th centuries, Melbourne’s Little Lonsdale Street – locally known as ‘Little Lon’ – was notorious as a foul slum and brothel district, occupied by the itinerant and the criminal. The stereotype of ‘slumdom’ defined ‘Little Lon’ in the minds of Melbournians, and became entrenched in Australian literature and popular culture. The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne tells a different story. This ground-breaking book reports on almost three decades of excavations conducted on the Commonwealth Block – the area of central Melbourne bordered by Little Lonsdale, Lonsdale, Exhibition and Spring streets. Since the 1980s, archaeologists and historians have pieced together the rich and complex history of this area, revealing a working-class and immigrant community that was much more than just a slum. The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne delves into the complex social, cultural and economic history of this forgotten community. Each chapter is authored by researchers who were responsible for the management and execution of the excavations and analysis of the Block. The authors outline the history and methodology of each stage of the project, and consider changes in theory and method (and inspiration and aspiration) in response to other studies, and to the changing disciplinary context of urban archaeology. This book makes an important contribution to the archaeology of the modern city.

The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne

The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne

Author: Tim Murray

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743322246

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 762

This groundbreaking book reports on almost three decades of excavations conducted on the Commonwealth Block – the area of central Melbourne bordered by Little Lonsdale, Lonsdale, Exhibition and Spring streets.

Exploring the Archaeology of the Modern City in Nineteenth-century Australia

Exploring the Archaeology of the Modern City in Nineteenth-century Australia

Author: Tim Murray

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030271695

Category: Social Science

Page: 291

View: 179

This book presents research into the urban archaeology of 19th-century Australia. It focuses on the detailed archaeology of 20 cesspits in The Rocks area of Sydney and the Commonwealth Block site in Melbourne. It also includes discussions of a significant site in Sydney – First Government House. The book is anchored around a detailed comparison of contents of 20 cesspits created during the 19th century, and examines patterns of similarity and dissimilarity, presenting analyses that work towards an integration of historical and archaeological data and perspectives. The book also outlines a transnational framework of comparison that assists in the larger context related to building a truly global archaeology of the modern city. This framework is directly related a multi-scalar approach to urban archaeology. Historical archaeologists have been advocating the need to explore the archaeology of the modern city using several different scales or frames of reference. The most popular (and most basic) of these has been the household. However, it has also been acknowledged that interpreting the archaeology of households beyond the notion that every household and associated archaeological assemblage is unique requires archaeologists and historians to compare and contrast, and to establish patterns. These comparisons frequently occur at the level of the area or district in the same city, where archaeologists seek to derive patterns that might be explained as being the result of status, class, ethnicity, or ideology. Other less frequent comparisons occur at larger scales, for example between cities or countries, acknowledging that the archaeology of the modern western city is also the archaeology of modern global forces of production, consumption, trade, immigration and ideology formation. This book makes a contribution to that general literature

An Archaeology of Nineteenth-Century Consumer Behavior in Melbourne, Australia, and Buenos Aires, Argentina

An Archaeology of Nineteenth-Century Consumer Behavior in Melbourne, Australia, and Buenos Aires, Argentina

Author: Pamela Ricardi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030215958

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 552

This book compares consumer behavior in two nineteenth-century peripheral cities: Melbourne, Australia and Buenos Aires, Argentina. It provides an analysis of domestic archaeological assemblages from two inner-city working class neighborhood sites that were largely populated by recently arrived immigrants.The book also uses primary, historical documents to assess the place of these cities within global trade networks and explores the types of goods arriving into each city. By comparing the assemblages and archival data it is possible to explore the role of choice, ethnicity, and class on consumer behavior. This approach is significant as it provides an archaeological assessment of consumer behavior which crosses socio-political divides, comparing a site within a British colony to a site in a former Spanish colony in South America. As two geographically, politically and ethnically distinct cities it was expected that archaeological and archival data would reveal substantial variation. In reality, differences, although noted, were small. Broad similarities point to the far-reaching impact of colonialism and consumerism and widespread interconnectedness during the nineteenth century. This book demonstrates the wealth of information that can be gained from international comparisons that include sites outside the British Empire.

The Women of Little Lon

The Women of Little Lon

Author: Barbara Minchinton

Publisher: Black Inc.

ISBN: 9781743821886

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 820

A vivid account of a remarkable but little-known chapter in Melbourne’s history Sex workers in nineteenth-century Melbourne were judged morally corrupt by the respectable world around them. But theirs was a thriving trade, with links to the police and political leaders of the day, and the leading brothels were usually managed by women. While today a city lane is famously named after Madame Brussels, the identities of the other ‘flash madams’, the ‘dressed girls’ who worked for them and the hundreds of women who solicited on the streets of the Little Lon district of Melbourne are not remembered. Who were they? What did their daily lives look like? What became of them? Drawing on the findings of recent archaeological excavations, rare archival material and family records, historian Barbara Minchinton brings the fascinating world of Little Lon to life. Barbara Minchinton is a historian and independent researcher. For several years she collaborated with a team of archaeologists on the interpretation of artefacts from Melbourne’s Little Lon district. She is the co-editor of The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne, a historical archaeology of the city’s working-class and immigrant communities, and the author of The Women of Little Lon.

Collections Vol 6

Collections Vol 6

Author: Collections

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442267749

Category: Reference

Page: 132

View: 795

A Letter from the Editor Juilee Decker Articles Collections Online: An Archival Approach to Digitization and Web Accessibility at the Archives of American Art Karen B. Weiss Imagining an Indigital Interface: Ara Irititja Indigenizes the Technologies of Knowledge Management Sabra Thorner Museums, Do You Copy? Standards on the Care and Handling of Facsimiles Exhibited in Museums Jocelyn Park Managing the Commonwealth Block Archaeological Assemblage: an Australian Case Study Charlotte H.F. Smith and Sarah Hayes Notes from the Archive: Epistolary Collecting in the University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Haidy Geismar Collecting Experiences: The Very Idea Miguel Tamen Book Reviews The Office Copying Revolution: History, Identification and Preservation by Ian Batterham Reviewed by Paul Kahan Museums in a Digital Age Edited by Ross Parry Reviewed by Susan Fishman-Armstrong Places of Pain and Shame: Dealing with ‘Difficult Heritage’ Edited by William Logan and Keir Reeves Reviewed by Laurel Racine

The Archaeology of Urban Landscapes

The Archaeology of Urban Landscapes

Author: Alan Mayne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521779758

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 331

This exciting 2001 collection on a movement in urban archaeology investigates the historical archaeology of urban slums. The material that is dug up - broken dinner plates, glass grog bottles, and innumerable tonnes of building debris, nails and plaster samples - will not quickly find its way into museum collections. But, properly interpreted, it yields evidence of lives and communities that have left little in the way of written records. Including eleven case studies, five on cities in the United States and one each on London and Sheffield, and futher chapters on Cape Town, Sydney, Melbourne and Quebec City, it maps out a new field, which will attract the attention of a range of students and scholars outside archaeology, in particular historical sociologists and historians.

Good taste, fashion, luxury: a genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish

Good taste, fashion, luxury: a genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish

Author: Sarah Hayes

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743324172

Category: History

Page: 114

View: 592

Melbourne grew during the 19th century from its fledgling roots into a global metropolitan centre, and was home to many people from a range of social and cultural backgrounds. The Martin family arrived in Melbourne in 1839 and soon established themselves at the genteel Viewbank estate near Heidelberg. They were typical of the early, middle-class immigrants to Melbourne who brought their gentility and privilege with them to the colony. The Martins spent many years at Viewbank, and the physical remains they left behind provide a valuable case study for examining class negotiation in the colony through historical archaeology. In this important study, material culture is used to understand the unique way in which the Martin family used gentility to establish and maintain their class position.

Flashy, Fun and Functional

Flashy, Fun and Functional

Author: Sarah Hayes

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743326152

Category: Social Science

Page: 84

View: 522

Against the backdrop of embryonic Melbourne, John Thomas Smith left behind his currency roots to become an influential member of society. A widely recognised figure about town smoking a cutty pipe and wearing a white top hat, in 1851 he became Lord Mayor of Melbourne; he went on to be re-elected seven times. His scandalous marriage to the daughter of an Irish Catholic publican, however, and his awkwardly appropriated gentility made him unpopular with certain sections of society. He could never shake the shadow of his background and was dogged by ignominious rumours. From 1849 to 1860 Smith and his family occupied 300 Queen Street, Melbourne, one of the first true residential townhouses in the city. Flashy, Fun and Functional: How Things Helped to Invent Melbourne’s Gold Rush Mayor explores the things they left behind. Excavations at the site in 1982 by Judy Birmingham and Associates uncovered a rich and important archaeological record of the Smiths’ lives in the form of a cesspit rubbish deposit. The recovered artefacts can be used to examine the distinctive way the Smith family used material culture to negotiate their position in colonial society. Popular decoration styles and expensive materials suggest the family’s efforts to secure their newly obtained social status. The artefacts evoke the turmoil, volatility and opportunity of life in the first decades of the colony of Port Phillip. They provide an example of the possibility of social mobility in the colony, but also of the challenges of navigating the customs of a newly forming society.