Destiny by Design

Destiny by Design

Author: Jeremy Sherman Snapp

Publisher: Heritage House Publishing Co

ISBN: 0967363357

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 175

Author/photographer Jeremy Snapp has produced a dramatic photo-essay of rare images that depict events in the decade preceding the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914. Original photos taken by Snapp's great-grandfather Gerald Sherman, a respected mining engineer of the day, deliver a technical perspective of this undertaking unlike anything previously published. Finally, as the U.S. ceded authority over the canal to the Panamanian government in 1999, Jeremy Snapp travelled to the canal zone with an antique cameratp capture images of the original buildings and construction relics that remained.

The Building of the Panama Canal in Historic Photographs

The Building of the Panama Canal in Historic Photographs

Author: Ulrich Keller

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486244082

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 132

View: 923

The tale of the canal's construction unfolds in a compelling narrative of risks, hardships, disasters, and triumph. More than 160 historic photographs document the hitherto unparalleled technological achievement, depicting exotic settings, workers' housing, Canal Zone's internal government, dredging operations, and other scenes from a true story of adventure, revolution, ordeal, and accomplishment.

What Is the Panama Canal?

What Is the Panama Canal?

Author: Janet B. Pascal

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780698171855

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 318

Before 1914, traveling from the East Coast to the West Coast meant going by land across the entire United States. To go by sea involved a long journey around South America and north along the Pacific Coast. But then, in a dangerous and amazing feat of engineering, a 48-mile-long channel was dug through Panama, creating the world’s most famous shortcut: the Panama Canal!

Seaway to the Future

Seaway to the Future

Author: Alexander Missal

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299229436

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 467

Realizing the century-old dream of a passage to India, the building of the Panama Canal was an engineering feat of colossal dimensions, a construction site filled not only with mud and water but with interpretations, meanings, and social visions. Alexander Missal’s Seaway to the Future unfolds a cultural history of the Panama Canal project, revealed in the texts and images of the era’s policymakers and commentators. Observing its creation, journalists, travel writers, and officials interpreted the Canal and its environs as a perfect society under an efficient, authoritarian management featuring innovations in technology, work, health, and consumption. For their middle-class audience in the United States, the writers depicted a foreign yet familiar place, a showcase for the future—images reinforced in the exhibits of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition that celebrated the Canal’s completion. Through these depictions, the building of the Panama Canal became a powerful symbol in a broader search for order as Americans looked to the modern age with both anxiety and anticipation. Like most utopian visions, this one aspired to perfection at the price of exclusion. Overlooking the West Indian laborers who built the Canal, its admirers praised the white elite that supervised and administered it. Inspired by the masculine ideal personified by President Theodore Roosevelt, writers depicted the Canal Zone as an emphatically male enterprise and Chief Engineer George W. Goethals as the emblem of a new type of social leader, the engineer-soldier, the benevolent despot. Examining these and other images of the Panama Canal project, Seaway to the Future shows how they reflected popular attitudes toward an evolving modern world and, no less important, helped shape those perceptions. Best Books for Regional Special Interests, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the Public Library Association “Provide[s] a useful vantage on the world bequeathed to us by the forces that set out to put America astride the globe nearly a century ago.”—Chris Rasmussen, Bookforum

Building the Panama Canal

Building the Panama Canal

Author: Sylvia Engdahl

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 9780737763645

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 224

View: 870

This compelling volume provides the historical background of the construction of the Panama Canal. Readers will learn how women played an important role in the project. Controversies are also explored, including the role that the United States played in the Panamanian Revolution. Personal narratives are presented, from sources such as Theodore Roosevelt and Helen Herron Taft. Other essay sources include the Panama Canal Authority, James T. Du Bois, and David Newton E. Campbell.

The Panama Canal

The Panama Canal

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1505342481

Category:

Page: 44

View: 880

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the construction written by workers and their family members *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." - Theodore Roosevelt Most people have heard of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, but while not as many have heard of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, those who have are aware that the Panama Canal is considered one of them. In a world where few natural rivers carved out over eons of time have reached a length of more than 50 miles, the idea that a group of men could carve a canal of that length seemed impossible. In fact, many thought it could not be done. On the other hand, there was a tremendous motivation to try, because if a canal could be successfully cut across Central America to connect the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, it would cut weeks off the time necessary to carry goods by sea from the well-established East Coast of the United States to the burgeoning West Coast. Moreover, traveling around the tip of South America was fraught with danger, and European explorers and settlers had proposed building a canal in Panama or Nicaragua several centuries before the Panama Canal was actually built. By the late 19th century, the French actually tried to build such a canal, only to fail after a great deal of resources were put into construction and after workers died of malaria and other illnesses. At the turn of the 20th century, not only was the need for a canal still there, but the right man was in the White House. Indeed, President Theodore Roosevelt, a celebrated outdoorsman, might have been the only president who could have foreseen and accomplished such an audacious feat, and even he considered it one of his crowning achievements. He wrote in his memoirs, "There are plenty of other things I started merely because the time had come that whoever was in power would have started them. But the Panama Canal would not have started if I had not taken hold of it, because if I had followed the traditional or conservative method I should have submitted an admirable state paper to Congress...the debate would be proceeding at this moment...and the beginning of work on the canal would be fifty years in the future. Fortunately [the opportunity] came at a period when I could act unhampered. Accordingly I took the Isthmus, started the canal and then left Congress not to debate the canal, but to debate me." Building the Panama Canal was a herculean task in every sense. Taking about 10 years to build, workers had to excavate millions of cubic yards of earth and fight off hordes of insects to make Roosevelt's vision a reality. Roosevelt also had to tie up the U.S. Navy in a revolt in Colombia to ensure Panama could become independent and thus ensure America had control of the canal. By 1914, ships were finally traversing through the Panama Canal, just as World War I was about to start, and a century later, the Panama Canal remains one of the world's most vital waterways. The Panama Canal looks at the origins and history of the important trade link between the Atlantic and Pacific. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Panama Canal like never before, in no time at all.

The Canal Builders

The Canal Builders

Author: Julie Greene

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101011553

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 252

A revelatory look at a momentous undertaking-from the workers' point of view The Panama Canal has long been celebrated as a triumph of American engineering and ingenuity. In The Canal Builders, Julie Greene reveals that this emphasis has obscured a far more remarkable element of the historic enterprise: the tens of thousands of workingmen and workingwomen who traveled from all around the world to build it. Greene looks past the mythology surrounding the canal to expose the difficult working conditions and discriminatory policies involved in its construction. Drawing extensively on letters, memoirs, and government documents, the book chronicles both the struggles and the triumphs of the workers and their fami­lies. Prodigiously researched and vividly told, The Canal Builders explores the human dimensions of one of the world's greatest labor mobilizations, and reveals how it launched America's twentieth-century empire.

The Construction Of The Panama Canal

The Construction Of The Panama Canal

Author: William Luther Sibert

Publisher: Franklin Classics

ISBN: 0343551969

Category:

Page: 388

View: 244

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.