The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: August 30, 1803-August 24, 1804

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: August 30, 1803-August 24, 1804

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803228694

Category: History

Page: 700

View: 490

"The journey of the Corps of Discovery, under the command of Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, across the American West to the Pacific Ocean and back in the years 1804-1806 seems to me to have been our first really American adventure, one that also produced our only really American epic, The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, now at last available in a superbly edited, easily read edition in twelve volumes (of an eventual thirteen), almost two centuries after the Corps of Discovery set out. . . . This important text has not been fully appreciated for what it is because of two centuries of incomplete and inadequate editing. All three editions previous to this excellent one from the University of Nebraska . . . were flawed by significant omission. . . . Thus my gratitude to the present editor, Gary Moulton, and his assistant editor, Thomas Dunlay, for bringing what I believe to be a national epic into plain view at last. . . . For almost two hundred years their [Lewis' and Clark's] strong words waited, there but not there, printed but not read: our silent epic. But words can wait: now the captains' writings have at last spilled out, and fully, in this regal edition. When the Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition appeared in 1983, critics hailed it as a publishing landmark. This eagerly awaited second volume of the new Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition begins the actual journals of those explorers whose epic expedition still enthralls Americans. Instructed by President Jefferson to keep meticulous records bearing on the geography, ethnology, and natural history of the trans-Mississippi West, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and four of their men filled hundreds of notebook pages with observations during their expedition of 1804–6. The result was in is a national treasure: a complete look at the Great Plains, the Rockies, and the Pacific Northwest, reported by men who were intelligent and well-prepared, at a time when almost nothing was known about those regions so newly acquired in the Louisiana Purchase. Volume 2 includes Lewis’s and Clark’s journals for the period from August 1803, when Lewis left Pittsburgh to join Clark farther down the Ohio River, to August 1804, when the Corps of Discovery camped near the Vermillion River in present South Dakota. The general introduction by Gary E. Moulton discusses the history of the expedition, the journal-keeping methods of Lewis and Clark, and the editing and publishing history of the journals from the time of Lewis and Clark’s return. Superseding the last edition published early in this century, the current edition brings together new materials discovered since then. It greatly expands and updates the annotation to take account of the most recent scholarship on the many subjects touched on by the journals.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: April 7-July 27, 1805

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: April 7-July 27, 1805

Author: Gary E. Moulton

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803228775

Category: History

Page: 548

View: 440

When the Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition appeared in 1983 critics hailed it as a publishing landmark in western history. Fully living up to the promise of the first volume were the second volume, which began the actual journals and brought the expedition through its first year to August 1804, and the third volume, which brought the explorers through a winter at Fort Mandan, present North Dakota, and to April 1805. This eagerly awaited fourth volume begins on April 7, 1805, when Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and their permanent party set out from Fort Mandan, traveling up-river along the banks of the Missouri. For the first time they entered country never explored by whites. With the help of the Shoshone Indian woman Sacagawea, they hoped to make friendly contact with her people, then cross the Rocky Mountains and eventually reach the Pacific. They were to spend the rest of the spring and the early summer toiling up the Missouri, or around its perilous falls. Along the way, they encountered grizzly bears, cataloged new species of plants and animals, and mapped rivers and streams. Sacagawea recognized landmarks; meeting her people became the next great concern of the expedition when they reached the three forks of the Missouri in late July. Superseding the last edition, published early in this century, the current edition contains new materials discovered since then. It expands and updates the annotation to take account of the most recent scholarship on the many subject touched on by the journals.

Bitterroot

Bitterroot

Author: Patricia Tyson Stroud

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812249842

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 949

Through a retelling of Lewis's life, from his resourceful youth to the brilliance of his leadership and accomplishments as a man, Patricia Tyson Stroud shows that Jefferson's unsubstantiated claim of his protégé's suicide is the long-held bitter root at the heart of the Meriwether Lewis story.

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: Patrick Gass

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 080328022X

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 513

An accomplished carpenter and boat builder, Patrick Gass proved to be an invaluable and well-liked member of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Promoted to sergeant after the death of Charles Floyd, Gass was almost certainly responsible for supervising the building of Forts Mandan and Clatsop. His records of those forts and of the earth lodges of the Mandans and Hidatsas are particularly detailed and useful. Gass was the last survivor of the Corps of Discovery, living until 1870?long enough to see trains cross a continent that he had helped open. His engaging and detailed journal became the first published account of the Lewis and Clark expedition. ø Gass's journal joins the celebrated Nebraska edition of the complete journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition, which feature a wide range of new scholarship dealing with all aspects of the expedition from geography to Indian cultures and languages to plants and animals.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journals of John Ordway, May 14, 1804-September 23, 1806, and Charles Floyd, May 14-August 18, 1804

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journals of John Ordway, May 14, 1804-September 23, 1806, and Charles Floyd, May 14-August 18, 1804

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803229143

Category: History

Page: 514

View: 733

Widely heralded as a lasting achievement, the University of Nebraska Press editions of the journals of Lewis and Clark now present volume 9 of the projected thirteen containing the complete record of the expedition. In order that the fullest record possible be kept of the journey, Captains Lewis and Clark required their sergeants to keep journals to guard against loss of the captains’ own accounts. The sergeants’ accounts extend and corroborate the journals of Lewis and Clark and contribute to the full record of the expedition. The bulk of this volume contains the fullest of the enlisted men’s records, the journal of John Ordway. As senior sergeant, Ordway was in command when the captains were absent from the main body of the expedition. He was also the sole member of the party never to miss a day in his journal; for several portions of the crossing, his is the only extant account. Ordway’s journal has never before been published with the other records of the venture. Charles Floyd’s journal is tragically short, ending with his death near present-day Sioux City, Iowa, on 20 August 1804. Floyd was the only member of the party to die en route, and his journal—adding several details absent from the captains’ records—indicates that the record of the journey is poorer for his loss.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journal of Patrick Gass, May 14, 1804-September 23, 1806

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journal of Patrick Gass, May 14, 1804-September 23, 1806

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 080322916X

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 989

The Lewis and Clark expedition is both one of the greatest geographical adventures undertaken by Americans and one of the best documented at the time. The University of Nebraska Press edition of the Journals of Lewis and Clark now reaches volume 10 of the projected 13 that will contain the complete record of the expedition. In order that the fullest record possible be kept of the expedition, captains Lewis and Clark required their sergeants to keep journals to compensate for possible loss of the captains' own accounts. The sergeants' accounts extend and corroborate the journals of Lewis and Clark and contribute to the full record of the expedition. Volume 10 contains the journal of expedition member Sergeant Patrick Gass. Gass was promoted to sergeant on the expedition to fill the place of the deceased Charles Floyd. His journal was subsequently published and proved quite popular: it went through six editions in six years. A skilled carpenter, Gass was almost certainly responsible for supervising the building of Forts Mandan and Clatsop; his records of those forts are particularly detailed and useful. Gass was to live until 1870, the last survivor of the expedition and the one who lived to see transcontinental communication fulfill the promise of the expedition. Gary E. Moulton is a professor of history at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and recipient of the J. Franklin Jameson Award of the American Historical Association for the editing of these journals.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journals of Joseph Whitehouse, May 14, 1804-April 2, 1806

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: The journals of Joseph Whitehouse, May 14, 1804-April 2, 1806

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803229186

Category: History

Page: 490

View: 990

The University of Nebraska Press editions of The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition are widely heralded as a lasting achievement. In all, thirteen volumes are projected, which together will provide a complete record of the expedition. Volume 11 contains the journals of expedition member Joseph Whitehouse. His journals are the only surviving account written by an army private on the expedition, and he is one of the least known of the expedition party. Following the expedition, Whitehouse had a checkered army career, and he disappeared after 1817. His capabilities have been unfairly slighted by previous commentators, despite his narrative skill and evidence that he was a man of a lively and curious mind. His extensive journal entries contribute to our understanding of the epochal journey and of the unusual group of men who undertook one of the defining events in our history. The last part of his journals was not found until 1966; this is the first publication of the complete record of his account.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Comprehensive index

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Comprehensive index

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803229429

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 522

Since the time of Columbus, explorers dreamed of a water passage across the North American continent. President Thomas Jefferson shared this dream. He conceived the Corps of Discovery to travel up the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains and westward along possible river routes to the Pacific Ocean. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led this expedition of 1804?6. Along the way they filled hundreds of notebook pages with observations of the geography, Indian tribes, and natural history of the trans-Mississippi West. ø This complete set of the celebrated Nebraska edition incorporates the journals along with a wide range of new scholarship dealing with all aspects of the expedition, including geography, Indian languages, plants, and animals, in order to recreate the expedition within its historical context.

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Herbarium of the Lewis & Clark Expedition

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Herbarium of the Lewis & Clark Expedition

Author: Gary E. Moulton

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803229313

Category: History

Page: 550

View: 863

The University of Nebraska Press editions of The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition are widely heralded as a lasting achievement. In all, twelve volumes and a comprehensive index are projected, which together will provide a complete record of the expedition. Volume 12 contains the most complete listing of the plant specimens cataloged by the Lewis and Clark expedition. All but one of the plants were collected by Meriwether Lewis, the most skilled botanist among the expedition’s members. The collection, however, was nearly lost over the years due to its scattering among various botanists who intended to catalog the expedition’s scientific discoveries. Fortunately, for many years the specimens have been in the care of major institutions, principally the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The 239 extant items are brought together here for the first time. This invaluable volume will assist researchers and enthusiasts hoping to identify each plant’s location, distribution, and use along the expedition’s route.

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: Meriwether Lewis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803280335

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 823

In twelve remarkable volumes, Gary E. Moulton has edited the journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804?6, thus making clear and accessible to all readers the plethora of maps and words with which Meriwether Lewis and William Clark documented one of the greatest ventures of discovery in American history. With the Comprehensive Index, the thirteenth volume, Moulton completes his work?and offers everyone who consults the Journals a complete and detailed means of locating specific passages, references, and particular people or places within the larger work. Throughout the edition, his guiding principles have been clarity and ease of use. Consequently, the notes are indexed more thoroughly here than in most works and include modern place-names, modern denominations for Indian nations, and current popular and scientific names for various cited species. This volume also contains a list of corrections for earlier volumes.

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

The Definitive Journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: John Ordway

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803280211

Category: History

Page: 446

View: 958

The dependable and matter-of-fact John Ordway was one of the mainstays of the Corps of Discovery, promoted early on to sergeant and serving as an able leader during the captains' absence. Fascinated by the peoples and places he encountered, Ordway became the most faithful journalist on the expedition?recording information not found elsewhere and making an entry for every day during the expedition. Ordway later married and became a prosperous owner of two plantations in Missouri. His honest and informative account, which remained undiscovered for a century, offers an unforgettable glimpse of an enlisted man's experiences and observations as he and the Corps of Discovery embarked on the journey of a lifetime. In contrast to Ordway's extensive chronicle stands the far-too-brief but intriguingly detailed eyewitness account of Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only member to die on the expedition. The journals of John Ordway and Charles Floyd are part of the celebrated Nebraska edition of the complete journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition, which feature a wide range of new scholarship on all aspects of the expedition from geography to Indian cultures and languages to plants and animals.