Trafalgar

Trafalgar

Author: Roy Adkins

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781405513449

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 186

This is the true story of the Battle of Trafalgar, Britain's most significant sea battle, as seen through the smoke-hazed gunports of the fighting ships. In an atmosphere of choking fumes from cannon and musket fire, amid noise so intense it was almost tangible, the crews of the British, French and Spanish ships did their best to carry out their allotted tasks. For over five hours they were in constant danger from a terrifying array of iron and lead missiles fired from enemy guns, as well as the deadly wooden splinters smashed from the ships' hulls by the cannon-balls. While the men manoeuvred the ships and kept the cannons firing, the women helped the surgeons tend the sick or helped the boys - the 'powder monkeys' - in the hazardous job of carrying gunpowder cartridges from the central magazine to the gun decks. Trafalgar set the seal on British naval supremacy, which became the mainspring for the growth of the British Empire, and in the short term not only prevented Napoleon from invading Britain, but also enabled Britain and its Continental allies to mount the campaign that would eventually defeat the French Emperor: without Trafalgar there would be no Waterloo.

Portsmouth Point

Portsmouth Point

Author: Cyril Northcote Parkinson

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 0853231397

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 368

Portsmouth Point has always been synonymous with British Naval history, inspiring everything from William Walton's overture to Rowlandson's watercolor. Portsmouth Point: The British Navy in Fiction, 1793-1815 is a timeless anthology of seafaring action that offers a fascinating glimpse of British naval life set against the thrilling backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. Each of the stories here covers a distinct part of everyday life on the high seas during wartime, from the daily routines of officers and men on the lower deck to the mysteries of rigging and the perilous nuances of naval battle. All of the authors included in this collection witnessed firsthand both the harsh and humorous realities of serving in the British navy. Portsmouth Point thus reveals both the bawdry revelry and anonymous warfare that occupied the lives of countless sailors. This illuminating look into British naval history will interest scholars of English literature, military historians, and seafaring enthusiasts alike.