The Old Stones of the South, Midlands & East of England

The Old Stones of the South, Midlands & East of England

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782441

Category: Travel

Page: 30

View: 213

This ebook covers the Neolithic and Bronze Age remains of southern and central England, from Wiltshire to the west and Derbyshire in the north, over to Kent and Essex in the east – yes, there are megalithic sites in Essex … read on to find out where! Wiltshire needs no introduction, but don’t forget the lesser-known sites there such as Merlin's Mound, which was recently confirmed as a prehistoric sibling to Silbury Hill. Unlike most books on megalithic sites, we haven't overlooked the southeast of England, where there are an unexpected number of beautiful long and round barrows, including one with its own protected view of St Paul's Cathedral. And if you want your fill of megalithic sites, there is no need to travel any further afield than Derbyshire, where there are many lovely sites to visit, from the massive henge of Arbor Low to the charming little woodland circle of Doll Tor to the fascinating complex of Barbrook, with one of the Peak District’s best-preserved stone circles. The Old Stones of the South, Midlands & East of England is part of a series covering the megalithic and other prehistoric sites of Britain and Ireland. The series is published together as The Old Stones: A Field Guide to the Megalithic Sites of Britain and Ireland, available as a book and an ebook.

The Old Stones of the West of England

The Old Stones of the West of England

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782397

Category: Travel

Page: 60

View: 225

This ebook covers the Neolithic and Bronze Age remains of Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, Gloucestershire and Dorset. If you’re looking to visit as many iconic megalithic sites in as short a time as possible, then West Penwith, at the very tip of Cornwall, should be high on your list, with its famous holed stone at Mên-an-Tol, the leaning pillar inside the circle of Boscawen-ûn, and much else. But there are many other treasures to find throughout the region. Dartmoor is famous for its stone rows (around 86 of these have been identified), and Exmoor for the challenge of its hard-to-spot “minilithic” settings. Britain’s second-largest stone circle is at Stanton Drew in Somerset, while the 10km (6 mile) long Dorest Cursus is probably Britain’s largest Neolithic site. If you’re visiting Gloucestershire, you may also want to download The Old Stones of Wales ebook as the sites here are very close to South Wales. The Old Stones of the West of England is part of a series covering the megalithic and other prehistoric sites of Britain and Ireland. The series is published together as The Old Stones: A Field Guide to the Megalithic Sites of Britain and Ireland, available as a book and an ebook.

The Old Stones of the North of England & Isle of Man

The Old Stones of the North of England & Isle of Man

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782403

Category: Travel

Page: 30

View: 970

This ebook covers Neolithic and Bronze Age places in Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumbria and Northumberland, as well as on the Isle of Man. The northern English sites split into two main groups: there are the famous stone circles of Cumbria and the Lake District to the west, and the less well-known but equally inspiring rock art of Northumberland near the east coast. But that's not all – there is also a multitude of rock art, megalithic and earthen sites across Yorkshire, with some hugely impressive standing stones that include our tallest at Rudston, and some magnificent henges, such as the rare triple henge of Thornborough. The Old Stones of the North of England & Isle of Man is part of a series covering the megalithic and other prehistoric sites of Britain and Ireland. The series is published together as The Old Stones: A Field Guide to the Megalithic Sites of Britain and Ireland, available as a book and an ebook.

The Old Stones of Ireland

The Old Stones of Ireland

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782434

Category: Travel

Page: 40

View: 760

This ebook covers both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. It could easily have been filled with sites from the Republic’s southwest alone, the counties of Cork and Kerry being famed for their wedge tombs and their stone circles (often in absolutely beautiful locations) that include Drombeg, Derreenataggart, Ardgroom, Shronebirrane, Uragh and many others. Otherwise, visitors tend to head for the cluster of sites around Newgrange (Co. Meath) to the east. That there were once even more prehistoric monuments in this rich farmland was revealed in the sweltering summer of 2018, when the parched earth showed up previously undetected sites as cropmarks. Also included in this ebook are many lesser-known but wonderful sites from the north and east of Ireland, such as the vast megalithic complexes of Beaghmore, Carrowmore and Carrowkeel. Each of these will take a whole day to explore fully, so allow plenty of time. The Old Stones of Ireland is part of a series covering the megalithic and other prehistoric sites of Britain and Ireland. The series is published together as The Old Stones: A Field Guide to the Megalithic Sites of Britain and Ireland, available as a book and an ebook.

The Old Stones of Scotland

The Old Stones of Scotland

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782427

Category: Travel

Page: 100

View: 675

Where to start with Scotland? From what amounts to a stone circle showroom at Machrie Moor on Arran in the southwest, up to Orkney in the far north where some of Britain’s most spectacular prehistoric remains can be found, there are amazing sites of all types up and down the country. Some settings are unexpected – Balfarg, one of Scotland’s largest henge monuments – is situated in the centre of a 1980s housing estate in Fife, while the stone circle of Craighead Badentoy in Aberdeenshire is surrounded by huge industrial containers. If you don't have long, then the Isle of Arran or Kilmartin Valley (Argyll) are good choices, as both are reachable in a day from Glasgow and contain a wealth of prehistoric monuments. If you have longer, then consider visiting Orkney or Western Isles such as Lewis and Harris for world-famous sites as well as hundreds of lesser-known treasures. The Old Stones of Scotland is part of a series covering the megalithic and other prehistoric sites of Britain and Ireland. The series is published together as The Old Stones: A Field Guide to the Megalithic Sites of Britain and Ireland, available as a book and an ebook.

The Old Stones

The Old Stones

Author: Andy Burnham

Publisher: Watkins

ISBN: 9781786782038

Category: Travel

Page: 727

View: 375

This is the only book about standing stones created by the whole community of megalith enthusiasts, as represented by the archaeologists, photographers, theorists and stones aficionados who post on the Megalithic Portal. It offers unparalleled coverage of Britain and Ireland's Neolithic and Bronze Age sites: where they are, what to look out for, how to understand them. Featuring 1,000+ sites (500 with full photographic profiles), the book includes many places not covered elsewhere. An introductory essay by archaeologist Vicki Cummings helps readers interpret the sites and surrounding landscape through prehistoric eyes. Throughout the book are feature articles by different contributors on a huge range of topics, from archaeological analysis of key sites (including Stonehenge, Avebury, Durrington Walls, the Dartmoor stone rows, Grimes Graves, the Cumbrian axe factories, Newgrange and many more), reports on cutting-edge excavations at sites such as Must Farm and Ness of Brodgar, as well as discussions of 'mysteries', such as otherworldly experiences, dowsing, healing sites, archaeoastronomy and sacred geometry. Up-to-date archaeological approaches, such as sensory and experimental archaeology, are also explained. Andy Burnham's introduction offers tips for megalith enthusiasts in the field, as well as 'how to' features on drone photography and 3D modelling. With its stunning contemporary design combined with a durable flexi binding, this is a volume to gift and to treasure, to pore over at home and take out on expeditions.

The Pelagic Dictionary of Natural History of the British Isles

The Pelagic Dictionary of Natural History of the British Isles

Author: Dr. Peter Jarvis

Publisher: Pelagic Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781784271961

Category: Nature

Page: 549

View: 323

A unique collection of concise but detailed information on 10,000 animals, plants, fungi and algae of the British Isles. Every species with an English common name is included. The compendium is in two parts. The first, smaller part, looks at various terms that people interested in natural history may come across. The second provides information on individual species or species groups, with entries on those with English (common) names, as well as selected families, orders, classes, etc. In the case of marine organisms, entries are given for intertidal and subtidal invertebrate species, and generally speaking for fish species that might be observed inshore. Indication is often given on distribution as well as whether a species is common, scarce or something in between. For some species a note is made of population size and trends. Comments are made where appropriate on etymology, both of the English name and the binomial. No other natural history dictionary or cognate publication relating to the British Isles is as comprehensive in taxonomic cover.

The Linguistic Atlas of England

The Linguistic Atlas of England

Author: Harold Orton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136188527

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 544

View: 649

This fascinating record of how English is spoken in England is now being reprinted. Over 400 maps detail differences in phonology, lexicon, morphology and syntax. The Atlas provides a unique survey of the linguistic geography of England. This volume was inspired by the English Dialect Survey which set out to elicit information about the current dialectical usages of the older members of the farming communities throughout rural England. The Survey secondly mapped this information to illustrate the regional distributions of those features of their speech which persisted from ancient times. Published after Orton's death, the publication of this volume testified to the sustained interest in the lingusitic geography of England.

Agriculture and Industry in South-Eastern Roman Britain

Agriculture and Industry in South-Eastern Roman Britain

Author: David Bird

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781785703225

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 461

The ancient counties surrounding the Weald in the SE corner of England have a strongly marked character of their own that has survived remarkably well in the face of ever-increasing population pressure. The area is, however, comparatively neglected in discussion of Roman Britain, where it is often subsumed into a generalised treatment of the ‘civilian’ part of Britannia that is based largely on other parts of the country. This book aims to redress the balance. The focus is particularly on Kent, Surrey and Sussex account is taken of information from neighbouring counties, particularly when the difficult subsoils affect the availability of evidence. An overview of the environment and a consideration of themes relevant to the South-East as a whole accompany 14 papers covering the topics of rural settlement in each county, crops, querns and millstones, animal exploitation, salt production, leatherworking, the working of bone and similar materials, the production of iron and iron objects, non-ferrous metalworking, pottery production and the supply of tile to Roman London. Agriculture and industry provides an up-to-date assessment of our knowledge of the southern hinterland of Roman London and an area that was particularly open to influences from the Continent.

Types of British Vegetation

Types of British Vegetation

Author: A. G. Tansley

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 520

View: 446

Excerpt from Types of British Vegetation: By Members of the General Committee for the Survey and Study of British Vegetation The work Of systematically surveying vegetation and recording the results on vegetation maps was begun in Scotland by the late Robert Smith in the Closing years of last century, and continued by his brother, 1 G. Smith, and various other workers. In 1904 these workers formed a committee, with the somewhat ponderous title of The Central Committee for the Survey and Study Of British Vegetation, to organise and facilitate work on these lines. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Prehistoric Britain

Prehistoric Britain

Author: Timothy Darvill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136973048

Category: Social Science

Page: 417

View: 636

Britain has been inhabited by humans for over half a million years, during which time there were a great many changes in lifestyles and in the surrounding landscape. This book, now in its second edition, examines the development of human societies in Britain from earliest times to the Roman conquest of AD 43, as revealed by archaeological evidence. Special attention is given to six themes which are traced through prehistory: subsistence, technology, ritual, trade, society, and population. Prehistoric Britain begins by introducing the background to prehistoric studies in Britain, presenting it in terms of the development of interest in the subject and the changes wrought by new techniques such as radiocarbon dating, and new theories, such as the emphasis on social archaeology. The central sections trace the development of society from the hunter-gatherer groups of the last Ice Age, through the adoption of farming, the introduction of metalworking, and on to the rise of highly organized societies living on the fringes of the mighty Roman Empire in the 1st century AD. Throughout, emphasis is given to documenting and explaining changes within these prehistoric communities, and to exploring the regional variations found in Britain. In this way the wealth of evidence that can be seen in the countryside and in our museums is placed firmly in its proper context. It concludes with a review of the effects of prehistoric communities on life today. With over 120 illustrations, this is a unique review of Britain's ancient past as revealed by modern archaeology. The revisions and updates to Prehistoric Britain ensure that this will continue to be the most comprehensive and authoritative account of British prehistory for those students and interested readers studying the subject.

The Geology of England and Wales

The Geology of England and Wales

Author: P. J. Brenchley

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN: 1862392005

Category: Science

Page: 588

View: 142

This second edition of 'The Geology of England and Wales' is considerably expanded from its predecessor, reflecting the increase in our knowledge of the region, and particularly of the offshore areas. Forty specialists have contributed to 18 chapters, which cover a time range from 700 million years ago to 200 million years into the future. A new format places all the chapters in approximately temporal order. Both offshore and economic geology now form an integral part of appropriate chapters.