Speechmakers' Bible

Speechmakers' Bible

Author: Cassell Illustrated

Publisher:

ISBN: 1844033376

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 650

For many of us, public speaking is among our greatest fears, but this book shows that with just a little guidance, anyone can look poised and sound professional. Whether you're at a job interview, celebration or funeral, "The Speechmakers' Bible" gives practical advice on how to overcome nerves, as well as advice on the length, content and delivery of your speech. Great speeches of the past show how others have tackled different subjects and situations, while quotes and jokes will help you on your way. Draft speeches are also included for those last minute emergencies!

Speech Makers Bible

Speech Makers Bible

Author: Kevin Balshaw

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 064649127X

Category: Public speaking

Page: 162

View: 322

Overcome the fear that strikes when a speech is called for. Speech assignments are near-death experiences for most people. Few communication professionals can claim specialist credentials as speechwriters. There is always the pressure of other deadlines. And there are the two barriers many find almost insurmountable: writing the spoken word; and writing for someone else. Having to write and deliver a presentation or speech at work or socially strikes fear into most hearts. Speech Makers Bible is based on decades writing headline speeches for government and corporate leaders. The book illustrates how to write a high level speech for public delivery, and to write polished speeches for everyday occasions and deliver them with confidence. It is a practical, step-by-step guide from a leading Australian speechwriter, laced with helpful and inspirational examples and case studies.

The Bible, Theology, and the Sciences

The Bible, Theology, and the Sciences

Author: Philippus Jacobus Hoedemaker

Publisher: Pantocrator Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 205

View: 533

What is the relationship between science and Scripture? Is it, as so many believe, no relationship at all? But how could that be the case, if God indeed has spoken? This question stood front and center in Philippus Jacobus Hoedemaker's mind as he set himself to justify the existence of the Free University in Amsterdam. Indeed, the task of that university was precisely to integrate Scripture and theology with science, in so doing to establish the circle of the sciences and arrive at the truth in a harmonious and coherent whole. As he here puts it: "The word 'apart from Me, you can do nothing' is also true in natural life. Science and philosophy likewise receive in Christ the key of truth, and need the light of the Holy Spirit. Loose, incoherent truths, isolated subject studies, correct data and logical inferences, do not yet guarantee pure knowledge. It could be asserted with just as much right that the sun could be taken away from our planetary system without causing any confusion, as that it were possible to conduct science in the right way without regard to Holy Scripture, or while one is unbelieving and hostile to the Christ of God. Individual truths stand in such a connection to the truth that only in that connection do they form one harmonious and coherent whole" (p. 124). Hoedemaker’s efforts to pursue science on the Reformed basis, in which the Bible and theology play a central role, is chronicled in the addresses included here. The "Dedication" given at the founding of the university explains the intention in broad strokes. “The Antirevolutionary Principle and Higher Education" provides a thorough justification of the Reformed basis of the university. From there Hoedemaker proceeds to a historical investigation of the Reformed principle vis-à-vis its main antagonists in the Dutch university context – Cartesianism and rationalism, Roman Catholicism, and Lutheranism. In “Church and School” he once again justifies the existence of the Free University and its Reformed principle. And in the provocatively titled “ Why Study Theology at the Free University?” he confronts his students with the question, are you simply seeking a paying position somewhere, or is your heart committed to pursuing the truth, to putting science on its proper basis, regardless of the cost? The question was anything but academic, as the university was not accredited and its graduates could count on employment neither in the national church nor in civil government. Then came the church split and Hoedemaker’s departure from the Free University. But he could still speak of the love he bore for that institution, despite its departure from the Reformed principle as he formulated it. “All the church and all the people” had become his motto, something which Kuyper and the Free University left far behind.

Women in the Hebrew Bible

Women in the Hebrew Bible

Author: Alice Bach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135238759

Category: Religion

Page: 566

View: 186

Women in the Hebrew Bible presents the first one-volume overview covering the interpretation of women's place in man's world within the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. Written by the major scholars in the field of biblical studies and literary theory, these essays examine attitudes toward women and their status in ancient Near Eastern societies, focusing on the Israelite society portrayed by the Hebrew Bible.

The Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible

The Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible

Author: Brad E. Kelle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190261177

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 980

The Oxford Handbook of Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible is a collection of essays that provide resources for the interpretation of the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah. The volume is not exhaustive in its coverage, but examines interpretive aspects of these books that are deemed essential for interpretation or that are representative of significant trends in present and future scholarship. The individual essays are united by their focus on two guiding questions: (1) What does this topic have to do with the Old Testament Historical Books? and (2) How does this topic help readers better interpret the Old Testament Historical Books? Each essay critically surveys prior scholarship before presenting current and prospective approaches. Taking into account the ongoing debates concerning the relationship between the Old Testament texts and historical events in the ancient world, data from Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian culture and history are used to provide a larger context for the content of the Historical Books. Essays consider specific issues related to Israelite/Judean history (settlement, state formation, monarchy, forced migration, and return) as they relate to the interpretation of the Historical Books. This volume also explores the specific themes, concepts, and content that are most essential for interpreting these books. In light of the diverse material included in this section of the Old Testament, the Handbook further examines interpretive strategies that employ various redactional, synthetic, and theory-based approaches. Beyond the Old Testament proper, subsequent texts, traditions, and cultures often received and interpreted the material in the Historical Books, and so the volume concludes by investigating the literary, social, and theological aspects of that reception.

The Performance of Tradition

The Performance of Tradition

Author: Ingela Edkvist

Publisher: Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology Uppsala Univ

ISBN: UOM:39015064954525

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 836

Deals with the popular theatre performance of Hira Gasy, and its actors and audiences in the central highland regions of Madagascar.

Beyond Orality

Beyond Orality

Author: Jacqueline Vayntrub

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315304175

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 441

Central to understanding the prophecy and prayer of the Hebrew Bible are the unspoken assumptions that shaped them—their genres. Modern scholars describe these works as “poetry,” but there was no corresponding ancient Hebrew term or concept. Scholars also typically assume it began as “oral literature,” a concept based more in evolutionist assumptions than evidence. Is biblical poetry a purely modern fiction, or is there a more fundamental reason why its definition escapes us? Beyond Orality: Biblical Poetry on its Own Terms changes the debate by showing how biblical poetry has worked as a mirror, reflecting each era’s own self-image of verbal art. Yet Vayntrub also shows that this problem is rooted in a crucial pattern within the Bible itself: the texts we recognize as “poetry” are framed as powerful and ancient verbal performances, dramatic speeches from the past. The Bible’s creators presented what we call poetry in terms of their own image of the ancient and the oral, and understanding their native theories of Hebrew verbal art gives us a new basis to rethink our own.

According to the Scriptures

According to the Scriptures

Author: David Allen

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN: 9780334055501

Category:

Page: 224

View: 214

"If all you know is the NT, you do not know the NT" - so the late NT scholar Martin Hengel is reputed to have said. This book, a study of the way in the NT writers utilized the Jewish Scriptures in order to describe, articulate and evaluate the death of Jesus, takes Hengel at his word. What Old Testament texts are quoted in the New Testament, how are they used and what might such analysis mean for the (contemporary) reader? Focusing in particular on the passion narratives in the Synoptic Gospels, According to the Scriptures seeks to engage with these questions. It will provide a useful new framework for thinking about why the early Church understood Jesus' death in terms of the Scriptures, what difference that understanding made, and what relevance that might have for us as we seek to make sense of the death of Jesus.

Christ Meets Me Everywhere

Christ Meets Me Everywhere

Author: Michael Cameron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199751297

Category: Philosophy

Page: 410

View: 625

Most readers first encounter Augustine's love for Scripture's words in the many biblical allusions of his masterwork, the Confessions. Augustine does not merely quote texts, but in many ways makes Scripture itself tell the story. In his journey from darkness to light, Augustine becomes Adam in the Garden of Eden, the Prodigal Son of Jesus' parable, the Pauline double personality at once devoted to and rebellious against God's law. Throughout he speaks the words of the Psalms as if he had written them. Crucial to Augustine's self-portrayal is his skill at transposing himself into the texts. He sees their properties and dynamics as his own, and by extension, every believing reader's own. In Christ Meets Me Everywhere, Michael Cameron argues that Augustine wanted to train readers of Scripture to transpose themselves into the texts in the same way he did, by the same process of figuration that he found at its core. Tracking Augustine's developing practice of self-transposition into the figures of the biblical texts over the course of his entire career, Cameron shows that this practice is the key to Augustine's hermeneutics.