Towards an Understanding of the Development of Antiquarian and Archaeological Thought and Practice in Cork Up to 1870

Towards an Understanding of the Development of Antiquarian and Archaeological Thought and Practice in Cork Up to 1870

Author: Joan Rockley

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:795306225

Category: Ireland

Page: 449

View: 585

Antiquarianism and archaeology emerged relatively late in Cork compared with Dublin, but this was not surprising given that Dublin was, in effect, the intellectual capital of Ireland up to the end of the eighteenth century. Outside Dublin, educational establishments and societies which encouraged the development of science based topics were not established until the start of the nineteenth century. Prior to the mid 1830s, antiquarian activity in Cork was carried out on an individual basis by men such as Abraham Abell, Thomas Crofton Croker and John Windele, however the establishment of the Cork Cuvierian Society in 1835 and the South Munster Antiquarian Society several years later brought those with antiquarian interests together at a time when there seems to have been an upsurge of interest in the Cork area. The numbers involved were relatively small but, under the influence of Windele in particular, both societies operated successfully for several decades in spite of the adverse effects of factors such as the lack of well established institutional structures to support the growth of archaeology and the often difficult economic, social and political situation. Research has shown that the Cork antiquarians were in contact with others of similar interests throughout Ireland and to a lesser extent in England both through personal contacts and through the membership of archaeological societies. As a result, they were well informed on developments in archaeological thought and practice elsewhere, but this did not necessarily mean that they were accepted or utilized in Cork and there were differences of opinion both at local level and also with some of their Dublin based counterparts. By 1870, partly due to the demise of some of those most involved and partly due to an apparent reluctance to accept the new concepts and practices, antiquarian activity and the development of archaeology in Cork had virtually ceased.

Communities of Science in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Communities of Science in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Author: Juliana Adelman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317315766

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 374

Adelman challenges historians to reassess the relationship between science and society, showing that the unique situation in Victorian Ireland can nonetheless have important implications for wider European interpretations of the development of this relationship during a period of significant change.

Antiquarians and Archaeology in Nineteenth-century Cork

Antiquarians and Archaeology in Nineteenth-century Cork

Author: Joan Rockley

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN: UOM:39015069037490

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 486

This volume looks at the development of antiquarianism in Cork from its earliest manifestations at the end of the eighteenth century up to about 1880, and in particular the spread of more scientific archaeological thought from the middle of the nineteenth century.

The Heritage of Ireland

The Heritage of Ireland

Author: Colin Rynne

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105110530776

Category: History

Page: 713

View: 759

Over sixty contributors examine Ireland's heritage from a management perspective: natural, man-made, and cultural heritage (archaeology, architecture, language, wildlife, etc.); conservation and interpretation (museology, archives, libraries, etc.);