Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey No. 44, 1901 (Classic Reprint)

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey No. 44, 1901 (Classic Reprint)

Author: United States Geological Survey

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 152802494X

Category: Science

Page: 132

View: 857

Excerpt from Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey No. 44, 1901 Third Annual Report of the United States Irrigation Survey, 1891; octavo, 576 pp. Printed as Part II of the Twelfth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, 1890-91. Contains Report upon the location and survey of reservoir sites during the fiscal year ended June 30, by A. H. Thompson; Hydrography of the arid regions, by F. H. N ewell; Irri gation in India, by Herbert M. Wilson. Illustrated by 93 plates and 190 figures. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1901

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1901

Author: United States Geological Survey

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0265587808

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 728

View: 981

Excerpt from Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1901: No. 41-47 It was found that the minimum flow could be relied upon to furnish water and lights for the citizens and very little more. It was of great value to the city, from a sanitary point of View, that there was during all these years a private water company, whose plant was operated by steam, supplying water and lights to the citizens. The history of this dam is unique in one respect, and that is in the number of engineers connected with it. Early in 1892 Mr. Joseph P. Frizell resigned, it is asserted, by reason of the fact that he was ham pered in his work by the city authorities. Other engineers resigned for similar causes, and at one time a contractor in charge was ordered to follow the instructions of a city official who was not an engineer. This peculiar method of conducting a great public work called forth severe criticisms from engineering journals. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers

Author: Geological Survey

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0266207332

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 866

View: 458

Excerpt from Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers: Of the United States Geological Survey, 1896 This paper by Mr. Wilson is the first of a proposed series of publica tions relating to water supply and irrigation. The object in View in undertaking a new series is to afi'ord an opportunity for prompt publi. Cation of short reports, generally popular in character, relating to the water resources and the methods of utilizing these, with especial ref erence to the employment of water in agriculture. To reply to ques tions arising in various parts of the country regarding the progress of the investigation of the water resources and the facts relating to the available supply of water for irrigation, power, or domestic use, it is necessary to have pamphlets which can be sent out freely, and which, in order to answer the particular needs of individuals or communities, will not be too general in character. The series of bulletins issued by the Survey would serve as such means of communication were it not for the fact that by law these must be sold, and thus can not be used for ofiicial purposes or for placing the information acquired by investiga tion at once in the hands of the persons seeking to know the facts. By the law authorizing this new series it is possible for the Survey to dis tribute these papers to correspondents and to the numerous volunteer assistants who at one time or another have kindly aided by replying to letters of inquiry or schedules asking for specific data. Without such Opportunities for distribution of small publications the oflicers of the Survey are placed in an embarrassing position, from the fact that they are compelled to ask favors in the way of statements and data of various kinds and are yet unable in general to more than thank the persons who have freely given their time to the preparation of letters and the filling out of blanks. Even when these persons have asked for a copy of the publication embodying the information which they have furnished, it has not been possible for a bulletin to be sent unless paid for by some member of the Survey. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1899

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1899

Author: United States Geological Survey

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0282999809

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 1034

View: 460

Excerpt from Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1899: No. 30 West Saginaw takes its water direct from the river, under a dock close to the heart of the city and near a large sewer, the settling tank being 75 by 22 feet and the river current variable. The water is of a muddy-green color, with a good deal of bark floating around in the tank. Alma takes water from a mill race 300 feet above a sewer. There is no protection to the banks of the stream above. Both of these places, however, use almost exclusively for drinking purposes water from deep wells which comes under clay and is therefore safe. In Saginaw it is said that the salt water from the deeper wells has found its way into some of the shallower rock wells and contaminated them, and the waste bitterns go into the river. But individual wells, however numerous, are not an ideal supply for a large town, with the running here and there to neighbors, the possibility of some wells being too shallow to be safe, and the liability to contamination from dug wells. The Saginaw is so sluggish a stream that it is practically a pond. A plant situated as far up as the East Saginaw plant, there fore, if the banks were bought for a riverside park and protected for a few miles, and if the reflux of water from the lower river were prevented, especially if there were a gravel bed instead of decaying planks between the settling tank and the river, might furnish a fairly satisfactory water supply; but one would probably not have to go far - not beyond Vassar - to secure an ample and pure supply in sand stone. Analyses of these waters will be given in a later paper. Most of the other large cities are supplied from the Great Lakes, and seem to find no objection to that source, though Chicago's experience shows that there is a possibility of danger to be guarded against. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1898, Vol. 10 (Classic Reprint)

Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1898, Vol. 10 (Classic Reprint)

Author: United States Department of Th Interior

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0266757189

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 902

View: 526

Excerpt from Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, 1898, Vol. 10 Throughout winter the days are invariably bright and sunny. A light fall of snow usually occurs once or twice in the year, but dis appears rapidly as soon as the sun shines. Notwithstanding that the thermometer falls much lower than one would expect, judging by the warm days. The low fall occurs only during a few hours preceding sun rise, so that the land is seldom frozen, and farming operations can be carried on almost every day in the year. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.