Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Author: James B. Garry

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188003

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 210

View: 537

When Meriwether Lewis began shopping for supplies and firearms to take on the Corps of Discovery’s journey west, his first stop was a federal arsenal. For the following twenty-nine months, from the time the Lewis and Clark expedition left Camp Dubois with a cannon salute in 1804 until it announced its return from the West Coast to St. Louis with a volley in 1806, weapons were a crucial component of the participants’ tool kit. In Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, historian Jim Garry describes the arms and ammunition the expedition carried and the use and care those weapons received. The Corps of Discovery’s purposes were to explore the Missouri and Columbia river basins, to make scientific observations, and to contact the tribes along the way for both science and diplomacy. Throughout the trek, the travelers used their guns to procure food—they could consume around 350 pounds of meat a day—and to protect themselves from dangerous animals. Firearms were also invaluable in encounters with Indian groups, as guns were one of the most sought-after trade items in the West. As Garry notes, the explorers’ willingness to demonstrate their weapons’ firepower probably kept meetings with some tribes from becoming violent. The mix of arms carried by the expedition extended beyond rifles and muskets to include pistols, knives, espontoons, a cannon, and blunderbusses. Each chapter focuses on one of the major types of weapons and weaves accounts from the expedition journals with the author’s knowledge gained from field-testing the muskets and rifles he describes. Appendices tally the weapons carried and explain how the expedition’s flintlocks worked. Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition integrates original research with a lively narrative. This encyclopedic reference will be invaluable to historians and weaponry aficionados.

Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Author: Jim Garry

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188027

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 137

When Meriwether Lewis began shopping for supplies and firearms to take on the Corps of Discovery’s journey west, his first stop was a federal arsenal. For the following twenty-nine months, from the time the Lewis and Clark expedition left Camp Dubois with a cannon salute in 1804 until it announced its return from the West Coast to St. Louis with a volley in 1806, weapons were a crucial component of the participants’ tool kit. In Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, historian Jim Garry describes the arms and ammunition the expedition carried and the use and care those weapons received. The Corps of Discovery’s purposes were to explore the Missouri and Columbia river basins, to make scientific observations, and to contact the tribes along the way for both science and diplomacy. Throughout the trek, the travelers used their guns to procure food—they could consume around 350 pounds of meat a day—and to protect themselves from dangerous animals. Firearms were also invaluable in encounters with Indian groups, as guns were one of the most sought-after trade items in the West. As Garry notes, the explorers’ willingness to demonstrate their weapons’ firepower probably kept meetings with some tribes from becoming violent. The mix of arms carried by the expedition extended beyond rifles and muskets to include pistols, knives, espontoons, a cannon, and blunderbusses. Each chapter focuses on one of the major types of weapons and weaves accounts from the expedition journals with the author’s knowledge gained from field-testing the muskets and rifles he describes. Appendices tally the weapons carried and explain how the expedition’s flintlocks worked. Weapons of the Lewis and Clark Expedition integrates original research with a lively narrative. This encyclopedic reference will be invaluable to historians and weaponry aficionados.

Lewis & Clark, Tailor Made, Trail Worn

Lewis & Clark, Tailor Made, Trail Worn

Author: Robert John Moore

Publisher: Farcountry Press

ISBN: 9781560372387

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 365

When the Lewis and Clark Expedition crossed a continent in 1803 to 1806, they started out in U.S. Army uniforms, which gradually had to be replaced with simple leather garments. For parts of those uniforms, only a single drawing, pattern, or example survives. Historian Moore and artist Haynes have researched archives and museums to locate and verify what the men wore, and Haynes has painted and sketched the clothing in scenes of the trip. Also included are Indian styles the men adopted, and the wardrobes of the Creole interpreters and the French boatmen. Weapons and accessories round out this complete record of what the expedition wore or carried--and why. A great reference for artists, living history performers, museums, and military historians.

The Indianization of Lewis and Clark

The Indianization of Lewis and Clark

Author: William R. Swagerty

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188218

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 830

View: 295

Although some have attributed the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition primarily to gunpowder and gumption, historian William R. Swagerty demonstrates in this two-volume set that adopting Indian ways of procuring, processing, and transporting food and gear was crucial to the survival of the Corps of Discovery. The Indianization of Lewis and Clark retraces the well-known trail of America’s most famous explorers as a journey into the heart of Native America—a case study of successful material adaptation and cultural borrowing. Beginning with a broad examination of regional demographics and folkways, Swagerty describes the cultural baggage and material preferences the expedition carried west in 1804. Detailing this baseline reveals which Indian influences were already part of Jeffersonian American culture, and which were progressive adaptations the Corpsmen made of Indian ways in the course of their journey. Swagerty’s exhaustive research offers detailed information on both Indian and Euro-American science, medicine, cartography, and cuisine, and on a wide range of technologies and material culture. Readers learn what the Corpsmen wore, what they ate, how they traveled, and where they slept (and with whom) before, during, and after the return. Indianization is as old as contact experiences between Native Americans and Europeans. Lewis and Clark took the process to a new level, accepting the hospitality of dozens of Native groups as they sought a navigable water route to the Pacific. This richly illustrated, interdisciplinary study provides a unique and complex portrait of the material and cultural legacy of Indian America, offering readers perspective on lessons learned but largely forgotten in the aftermath of the epic journey.

American Cowboy

American Cowboy

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 116

View: 671

Published for devotees of the cowboy and the West, American Cowboy covers all aspects of the Western lifestyle, delivering the best in entertainment, personalities, travel, rodeo action, human interest, art, poetry, fashion, food, horsemanship, history, and every other facet of Western culture. With stunning photography and you-are-there reportage, American Cowboy immerses readers in the cowboy life and the magic that is the great American West.

Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, with Related Documents, 1783-1854

Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, with Related Documents, 1783-1854

Author: Donald Jackson

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252006976

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 717

This beautiful two-volume, boxed set covers all aspects of the Lewis and Clark Expedition from its authorization and planning through Meriwether Lewis's violent death. A cornerstone of any library emphasizing the American West, Donald Jackson's splendid edition assembles letters, memoranda, and other documents of the expedition, providing detailed commentary and notes.

Early Military Rifles

Early Military Rifles

Author: Balázs Németh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472842329

Category: History

Page: 81

View: 780

The conduct of combat operations in open order during the 18th and 19th centuries required an improved firearm with more accuracy than the standard-issue smoothbore infantry musket. Consequently, the appearance of a new type of regular light infantry soldier and an innovative military firearm, the rifle, marked a new age in the history of warfare. During the 18th century both Austria and Prussia fielded light troops armed with rifled firearms, while conflicts in North America involved the deadly long rifle and the innovative Ferguson breech-loader. Rifle-armed specialists also fought for several nations during the Napoleonic Wars. However, it was the decades after 1815 that saw the appearance of successful rifled percussion firearms, paving the way for the widespread issue of rifled weapons. This development was accelerated by the Prussian adoption of the Dreyse 'needle gun' in 1848 and in 1849, the French Minié rifle was the first successful conical ball rifle concept to be issued to regular troops in large numbers. Illustrated throughout with stunning full-colour artwork, this study charts the development, combat use, influence and legacy of rifled firearms in a host of conflicts, from the War of the Austrian Succession of 1740–48 to the Mexican–American War of 1846–48.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Author: Tim McNeese

Publisher: Infobase Holdings, Inc

ISBN: 9781438198767

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 968

In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson commissioned the Corps of Discovery as a scientific expedition to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase. The goal was to learn more about the Northwest's natural resources, inhabitants, and possibilities for settlement. The Lewis and Clark expedition was the second recorded transcontinental crossing of North America north of Mexico by white Americans. Their journey was significant in that the first accurate maps of the area were produced, there was a better understanding of the Northwest's natural resources, and they established friendly relations with American Indians. Although they were unable to locate the fabled, elusive Northwest Passage, Lewis and Clark's achievements sparked American interest in the West and strengthened the nation's claim to the area.

The Guns of Harpers Ferry

The Guns of Harpers Ferry

Author: Stuart E. Brown, Jr.

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN: 9780806346403

Category: History

Page: 157

View: 533

This standard history of Bath County. Of greatest genealogical import are the chapters devoted to the names of heads of families in Bath in 1782, early marriage records, a roster of Confederate soldiers, and a list of families in Greater Bath.