When a Jew Dies

When a Jew Dies

Author: Samuel C. Heilman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520219651

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 124

This account of the traditional customs that are practiced when a Jewish person dies provides an anthropological perspective on Jewish rites of mourning, and explains the cultural meaning behind Jewish practices and traditions.

The Alef-Bet of Death Dying as a Jew: A Guide for the Dying out of Jewish Traditional Sources

The Alef-Bet of Death Dying as a Jew: A Guide for the Dying out of Jewish Traditional Sources

Author: Rabbi Ariel Stone

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781483494975

Category: Religion

Page: 132

View: 212

Dying is not a moment at the end of life, but instead a path lined with opportunities to reflect, explore, and contemplate. In an insightful guidebook on the meaning of death, Rabbi Ariel Stone shares spiritual commentary, Jewish stories, and other writings that provide information and inspiration about the process of death as seen through the prism of Jewish learning and culture. Through stories of those who have gone before us and a step-by-step process that addresses the spiritual significance of death, Stone offers ways to think, feel, and wonder about death while inviting the dying to overcome fears and view the end of earthly life as an opportunity to repent, reflect on the influence we have upon others, and find peace as our light merges with the eternal light. The Alef-Bet of Death: Dying as a Jew? is a valuable guide that teaches the meaning of death in the Jewish tradition while offering clarity, light, and comfort to those walking the often vague and dark path to dying.

Jewish Rites of Death

Jewish Rites of Death

Author: Richard A. Light

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN: 9781938288579

Category: Religion

Page: 162

View: 327

Death is the ultimate transformative experience. For Jewish communities, the ways this is dealt with—shaped by millennia of custom and belief—do more than routinely follow a set of prescribed practices; they provide an opening to a series of traditions compelling in their profound beauty and power. In Jewish Rites of Death, Rick Light presents both a practical, informative guide to these practices and a compendium in which local volunteers who bring the blessings of these traditions to both the deceased and the bereaved write of the immeasurable enhancement their own lives have gained from them as well. As the personal stories of author and his contributors make clear, the prayers, the physical actions in preparing the dead for burial, and the intentions of the heart involved in Jewish death rituals open a unique window on the fine line a soul passes over between this world and the next. Those choosing to involve themselves with the crossing of this boundary tell in Jewish Rites of Death of feelings, thoughts, inspiration—and maybe even a little wisdom—that result from their shared experiences. Jewish tradition teaches that death is not taboo or hidden; it is simply part of the cycle of events that constitute a life. In its deepest sense, this book offers basic and eternal truths on what it really means to be human.

After One-Hundred-and-Twenty

After One-Hundred-and-Twenty

Author: Hillel Halkin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691181165

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 339

A deeply personal look at death, mourning, and the afterlife in Jewish tradition After One-Hundred-and-Twenty provides a richly nuanced and deeply personal look at Jewish attitudes and practices regarding death, mourning, and the afterlife as they have existed and evolved from biblical times to today. Taking its title from the Hebrew and Yiddish blessing to live to a ripe old age—Moses is said to have been 120 years old when he died—the book explores how the Bible's original reticence about an afterlife gave way to views about personal judgment and reward after death, the resurrection of the body, and even reincarnation. It examines Talmudic perspectives on grief, burial, and the afterlife, shows how Jewish approaches to death changed in the Middle Ages with thinkers like Maimonides and in the mystical writings of the Zohar, and delves into such things as the origins of the custom of reciting Kaddish for the deceased and beliefs about encountering the dead in visions and dreams. After One-Hundred-and-Twenty is also Hillel Halkin's eloquent and disarmingly candid reflection on his own mortality, the deaths of those he has known and loved, and the comfort he has and has not derived from Jewish tradition.

Living with Loss, Healing with Hope

Living with Loss, Healing with Hope

Author: Earl A. Grollman

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807028134

Category: Self-Help

Page: 124

View: 143

The author of Living When a Loved One Has Died draws from Jewish wisdom and tradition to provide thoughtful advice on moving through loss with grace and hope Earl Grollman's Living When a Loved One Has Died has brought comfort to more than 250,000 readers. In Living with Loss, Healing with Hope, Grollman speaks directly to mourners of the Jewish faith. By weaving quotations from Jewish writers and philosophers into his comforting and expert prose, Grollman guides readers through the journey of mourning, healing, and hope. A colleague of Grollman's once told him, “Earl, I am not a member of your faith, but if I wanted the soundest emotional and spiritual approach to death, I would be a Jew.” Occasionally quoting from sacred texts as well as Jewish writers and philosophers, Living with Loss, Healing with Hope illuminates Judaism's powerful recognition of the trauma of grief and of the mourner's responsibility eventually to return to the rhythm of life. In a brief final section, the author guides readers through Jewish funeral observances, Shiva, and beyond, and reminds all that these symbolic customs are ‘about change-remembrance, letting go, and moving on.’ “Earl Grollman is still the master of consolation. Every word of this little book is a polished jewel.” —Harold S. Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People

The Jewish Dark Continent

The Jewish Dark Continent

Author: Nathaniel Deutsch

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674062641

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 128

The Jews of the Pale of Settlement created a distinctive way of life little known beyond its borders. Just before World War I, a socialist revolutionary named An-sky and his team collected jokes, recorded songs, took thousands of photographs, and created a revealing questionnaire in Yiddish, translated here in its entirety for the first time.

Dust to Dust

Dust to Dust

Author: Allan Amanik

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479800803

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 390

A revealing look at how death and burial practices influence the living Dust to Dust offers a three-hundred-year history of Jewish life in New York, literally from the ground up. Taking Jewish cemeteries as its subject matter, it follows the ways that Jewish New Yorkers have planned for death and burial from their earliest arrival in New Amsterdam to the twentieth century. Allan Amanik charts a remarkable reciprocity among Jewish funerary provisions and the workings of family and communal life, tracing how financial and family concerns in death came to equal earlier priorities rooted in tradition and communal cohesion. At the same time, he shows how shifting emphases in death gave average Jewish families the ability to advocate for greater protections and entitlements such as widows’ benefits and funeral insurance. Amanik ultimately concludes that planning for life’s end helps to shape social systems in ways that often go unrecognized.

Jewish Wisdom for Living and Dying

Jewish Wisdom for Living and Dying

Author: Steven Moss

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781666750393

Category: Religion

Page: 139

View: 366

Numerous ritual manuals from the Jewish tradition have been written outlining the prayers and ceremonies that can be offered to the sick, the dying, and the dead. Two of the most outstanding of these manuals are Maavor Yabok and Sefer HaHayiim from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, respectively. This is the first book to analyze and compare these two important works, showing how they differ and compare. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the prayers and rituals presented in Maavor Yabok and their spiritual underpinnings taken from the tradition of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. This book can be useful to those individuals who are sick or dying and looking for help and comfort from the Jewish sources. It is written, however, as a challenge to those in the Jewish community today, especially workers in Jewish burial societies, the Chevra Kadisha, to take these manuals and re-write them for the twenty-first century, including the spiritual directives to make these rituals and prayers more meaningful not only for their recipients but for those offering them.