Whose Tradition?

Whose Tradition?

Author: Nezar AlSayyad

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317276036

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 790

In seeking to answer the question Whose Tradition? this book pursues four themes: Place: Whose Nation, Whose City?; People: Whose Indigeneity?; Colonialism: Whose Architecture?; and Time: Whose Identity? Following Nezar AlSayyad’s Prologue, contributors addressing the first theme take examples from Indonesia, Myanmar and Brazil to explore how traditions rooted in a particular place can be claimed by various groups whose purposes may be at odds with one another. With examples from Hong Kong, a Santal village in eastern India and the city of Kuala Lumpur, contributors investigate the concept of indigeneity, the second theme, and its changing meaning in an increasingly globalized milieu from colonial to post-colonial times. Contributors to the third theme examine the lingering effects of colonial rule in altering present-day narratives of architectural identity, taking examples from Guam, Brazil, and Portugal and its former colony, Mozambique. Addressing the final theme, contributors take examples from Africa and the United States to demonstrate how traditions construct identities, and in turn how identities inform the interpretation and manipulation of tradition within contexts of socio-cultural transformation in which such identities are in flux and even threatened. The book ends with two reflective pieces: the first drawing a comparison between a sense of ‘home’ and a sense of tradition; the second emphasizing how the very concept of a tradition is an attempt to pin down something that is inherently in flux.

Whose Tradition? Which Dao?

Whose Tradition? Which Dao?

Author: James F. Peterman

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438454214

Category: Religion

Page: 342

View: 596

Considers the notable similarities between the thought of Confucius and Wittgenstein. In an incisive work of comparative philosophy, James F. Peterman considers the similarities between early Chinese ethicist Confucius and mid-twentieth century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Their enduring legacies rest in no small part on projects to restore humanity to healthy ways of living and thinking. Confucius offers a method of answering ethical questions designed to get his interlocutors further along on the Dao, the path of right living. Struggling with his own forms of unhealthy philosophical confusion, Wittgenstein provides a method of philosophical therapy designed to help one come into agreement with norms embedded in our forms of life and speech. Highlighting similarities between the two philosophers, Peterman shows how Wittgensteinian critique can benefit from Confucian inquiry and how Confucian practice can benefit from Wittgensteinian investigations. Furthermore, in presenting a way to understand Confucius’s Dao as concrete language games and forms of life, and Wittgenstein’s therapeutic interventions as the most fitting philosophical orientation toward early Confucian ethics, Peterman offers Western thinkers a new, sophisticated understanding of Confucius as a philosopher. James F. Peterman is Professor of Philosophy and Director of Community Engagement at Sewanee: The University of the South. He is the author of Philosophy as Therapy: An Interpretation and Defense of Wittgenstein’s Later Philosophical Project, also published by SUNY Press.

Whose God? Which Tradition?

Whose God? Which Tradition?

Author: D.Z. Phillips

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351873017

Category: Religion

Page: 184

View: 561

Philosophy of Religion is marked by controversy over which philosophical accounts do justice to core religious beliefs. Many Wittgenstinian philosophers are accused by analytic philosophers of religion of distorting these beliefs. In Whose God? Which Tradition?, the accusers stand accused of the same by leading philosophers in the Thomist and Reformed traditions. Their criticisms alert us to the dangers of uncritical acceptance of dominant philosophical traditions, and to the need to do justice to the conceptual uniqueness of the reality of God. The dissenting voices breathe new life into the central issues concerning the nature of belief in God.

Homer’s Traditional Art

Homer’s Traditional Art

Author: John Miles Foley

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271072395

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 975

In recent decades, the evidence for an oral epic tradition in ancient Greece has grown enormously along with our ever-increasing awareness of worldwide oral traditions. John Foley here examines the artistic implications that oral tradition holds for the understanding of the Iliad and Odyssey in order to establish a context for their original performance and modern-day reception. In Homer's Traditional Art, Foley addresses three crucially interlocking areas that lead us to a fuller appreciation of the Homeric poems. He first explores the reality of Homer as their actual author, examining historical and comparative evidence to propose that "Homer" is a legendary and anthropomorphic figure rather than a real-life author. He next presents the poetic tradition as a specialized and highly resonant language bristling with idiomatic implication. Finally, he looks at Homer's overall artistic achievement, showing that it is best evaluated via a poetics aimed specifically at works that emerge from oral tradition. Along the way, Foley offers new perspectives on such topics as characterization and personal interaction in the epics, the nature of Penelope's heroism, the implications of feasting and lament, and the problematic ending of the Odyssey. His comparative references to the South Slavic oral epic open up new vistas on Homer's language, narrative patterning, and identity. Homer's Traditional Art represents a disentangling of the interwoven strands of orality, textuality, and verbal art. It shows how we can learn to appreciate how Homer's art succeeds not in spite of the oral tradition in which it was composed but rather through its unique agency.

Tradition and Transition in East Africa

Tradition and Transition in East Africa

Author: P.H. Gulliver

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136529405

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 978

First published in 1969. Divided into two parts, the first sections in the book examine the significance of the tribal factor in certain general contexts and discuss some of the particular backgrounds to contemporary transition in East Africa. There are essays on politics, economic development, language, law and education, together with a comparative look at European nationalism. In the second part, the grass-roots basis and development of the concept of the tribe are considered and its operation in social life in rural areas discussed. The contributions come from a wide range of scholars in the social sciences, history and law and the contributors are: W.J. Argyle, George Bennett, Tom J. Mboya, W.H. Whiteley, Eugene Cotran, J.W. Tyler, J.S. La Fontaine, Michael Twaddle, Kathleen M. Stahl, P.H. Gulliver, Kirsten Alneas, David J. Parkin, R.D. Grillo, I.M. Lewis, H.F. Morris.

The Search for Fundamentals

The Search for Fundamentals

Author: Lieteke van Vucht Tijssen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401585002

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 815

Modernity dissolves absolute certainties; late modernity dissolves them absolutely. In the modern world system there appears to be no firm, unchallenged ground on which to construct a meaningful canopy. But around the world, many individuals and groups long for a kind of cultural coherence that they believe once existed. They search for fundamentals. While these may be sought in religious traditions, many also aspire to new secular certainties. In their various new forms and contexts the contemporary quests for meaning in turn transform the societies in which they occur. The rich comparative examples in The Search for Fundamentals are used to analyze the sources and consequences of several cultural movements. The book also offers theoretical reflections on the difficulties they experience and on the message they carry for students of modernity. Audience: A broad readership of scholars and advanced students in the social sciences and humanities.